PASSIONFLOWERS FROM SCOTT MEMHARD

Scott Memhard share his gorgeous Passionflower, which he grew from seed! I asked how hardy is his vine because our Maypop died out after a very bad winter several years ago.

“Kim – I hadn’t heard them called Maypop before. They’re hard to winter over around here, even in a sheltered location with heavy mulch.  I started several varieties of these, Passionflower vines and Cup & Saucer vines, from seed last fall inside, and they’ve been doing well this summer.  My grandmother always had a Passionflower vine that she’d brought from Bermuda, where they’re grown for perfume, in her little greenhouse.  As kids we were very impressed by their incredible delicate structure and colors, especially when she preserved the flowers by dipping in hot melted wax!”

Scott’s photos are of the North American native species  Passiflora incarnata. We here on Cape Ann are located in the tippy most northern range of this beautiful vine. All the rest (500 species) are more tropical. Maypop grows prolifically in the southeastern US and the foliage is the caterpillar food plant of FOUR species of butterflies: Gulf Fritillary, Julia, Zebra Longwing, and Variegated Fritillary. One of numerous common names, it is called Maypop because in the southeast the vine has a habit of popping up in May, in a location where you did not plant. Maypop spreads by root suckers. Other common name include Wild Passionflower, Apricot Vine, Old Field Apricot, Holy-Trinity Flower, Molly-pop, Passion Vine, Popapple, Granadilla, Maycock, Maracoc, Maracock, White Sarsaparilla, and Purple Passion Vine.

Scott Memhard Photos