Reminder! Cape Ann Narratives of Art and other special museum events this January

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From the Cape Ann Museum – Entrance to the museum is free in January for Cape Ann residents. Some programs require registering and tickets.

3PM Saturday, January 6 Quick Steps & Ballads prior GMG post

10AM- 12PM Saturday, January 13  CAM KIDS LEGO STUDIO. See prior GMG post

3PM Saturday, January 13, 2017 Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life- A Discussion at the Cape Ann Museum

“The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life: A Discussion on Saturday, January 13 at 3:00 p.m.  This program is free for CAM members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations are not required. Call (978)283-0455 x10 for more information.

Join Martin Ray and several of the artists featured in his new book Cape Ann Narratives of Art in Life. Ray’s work explores the artistic talent that local residents have brought to their occupations. Whether one is a writer or woodworker, pastor or painter, mayor or musician, Ray classifies each as an artist, and celebrates the mastery that is exhibited in his/her craft. Panelists include Anne Deneen, pastor; Nan Webber, theater director; Brian King, musician; and Stephen Bates, musician/sculptor.

During the month of January the Cape Ann Museum opens its doors to all Cape Ann residents, in an effort to encourage membership, but also to bring the greater community into closer contact with their art, history and culture. This program will do just that, shedding light on locals who take pride in their craft with unwavering commitment and dedication. Does pursuing one’s vocation make one an artist? You decide.” Image credit (book cover): Martin Ray, 2017.

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10AM -12:15PM, Wednesdays, January 17-February 7, three Wednesdays– print workshop with Mary Rhinelander

Visit the museum event’s page to see the plentiful programming

Kirkus review and book launch at Charles Fine Arts for the new children’s story about Bobbi Gibb, first woman Boston Marathoner and artist

IMG_20170608_150512.jpgLast chance | last week to visit current group exhibition at

Charles Fine Arts 

Flowers and Elegant Objects

closes June 16, 2017

 

Group show features Bobbi Angell,   Liz Ayer,   Stephen Bates,   David Bareford,   Lorrie Berry,   Eli Cedrone,   Geoffrey Teale Chalmers,   Anne Winthrop Cordin,   Traci Thayne Corbett,   Yhanna Coffin,   Fran Ellisor,   Bobbi Gibb,   Paul George,   Ellen Granter,   Marjorie Hicks,   Christine Molitor Johnson,   Bonita LeFlore,   Nella Lush,   Marija Pavlovich McCarthy,   Tracy Meola,   Carole Porter,   Judith Monteferrante,   Katherine Richmond,   Jan Roy,   Rosalie Sidoti,   Tony Schwartz,   Charles Shurcliff,   Deb Wolf

Special Event June 13

Charles Fine Art is hosting a book launch Tuesday June 13 for the new children’s book about Bobbi, The Girl Who Ran, by Kristina Yee and Frances Poletti with illustrations by Susanna Chapman. The event is co hosted by Sawyer Free Library and The Book Store. Here’s the Kirkus Review:

Bobbi Gibb page

The Girl Who Ran kristina yee

IMG_20170608_150752 (1).jpg“In cooperation with Gibb herself, Poletti and Yee tell the story of the first woman to run the Boston Marathon, questioning authority with her feet.

The Boston Marathon had been taking place for 70 years when Bobbi Gibb, a white woman, steps illegally to the starting line in 1966, a hoodie covering her hair. Her road there is strewn with the land mines of bias, everything from “So unladylike” to the official comments on the rejection to her application: “Women cannot run marathons. It’s against the rules.” Poletti and Yee neatly evoke the joy some find in running, simply running. Gibb “ran with her pack, going higher and higher, / the world whooshing by, like the wind in the fire.” Such couplets are found every few pages, the last four words the refrain. Readers gain a sense of the experience through Chapman’s artwork, the light-footed energy of the watercolors slipping outside the pen’s fine line, a veil of wind trailing behind Gibb. Halfway through the race her ruse is up. She is boiling in her hoodie and confides to a fellow marathoner, a black man, that she is afraid of ejection. “We won’t let anyone throw you out; it’s a free road.” Well-told and illustrated, Gibb’s story speaks to not only women’s fight for equality, but the power of community.”