Dogtown news

Consideration of Dogtown for National Historic Register failed to pass last night 2 to 6 (and one recused).  1623 Studios (formerly Cape Ann TV) films city council meetings so if you missed the meeting you’ll be able to catch it there.

This just in from Lisa Smith: “1623 Studios recorded last night’s City Council Meeting, which had a hearing about Dogtown, and it will air on Channel 20 on Saturday at 1pm and 11:30 pm.” Once 1623 Studio edits, they’re uploaded to its youtube channel here. 

And here’s a link to Ray Lamont’s coverage in Gloucester Daily Times posted on line now and in print tomorrow.

Dogtown detail google maps
detail from satellite view Google maps – blue dots indicate photos for some Babson boulders relative to (red circles) O’Maley, Applied Materials, Babson museum, watersheds, whale’s jaw

Twentieth century gift to the city by Roger W. Babson

Babson Reservoir and Sanctuary 1931 dedication plaque Gloucester MA photograph 20160810_©catherine ryan
BABSON RESERVOIR AND SANCTUARY [eleven hundred and fifty acres] commemorative plaque 1931 “This reservoir, watershed and reservation are for the people of Gloucester, the land having been given in memory of my father and grandfather who roamed over these rocky hills. They had the vision that some day it should be conserved for the uses of the city and as an inspiration to all lovers of god and nature. Roger W. Babson”

a few prior Dogtown posts-

April 28 Annual Dogtown day – ribbon cutting and some reasearch results

Oct 2017 there was a public presentation about an archaelogical consultation and information about historic designation: Before Dogtown was Dogtown

March 2017 What if…a section of Dogtown brush was cleared away? Summit by Essex County Greenbelt & Mass Audubon at Cape Ann Museum 

Gloucester Motif Monday: conservation inspiration. Roger Babson, Sarah Fraser Robbins, Sarah Evans, Philip Weld JR

20160810_105339

 Babson

Reservoir

and Sanctuary

[Eleven hundred and fifty acres]

THIS RESERVOIR, WATERSHED, AND

RESERVATION ARE FOR THE PEOPLE

OF GLOUCESTER, THE LAND HAVING

BEEN GIVEN IN MEMORY OF MY

FATHER AND MY GRANDFATHER WHO

ROAMED OVER THESE ROCKY HILLS–

THEY HAD THE VISION THAT SOME

DAY IT SHOULD BE CONSERVED FOR

THE USES OF THE CITY AND AS

AN INSPIRATION TO ALL LOVERS

OF GOD AND NATURE

-ROGER W BABSON, 1931

There are examples of land preservation, but featuring a watershed in 1931? Isn’t it wonderful! If you haven’t seen it in a while, it’s worth a close look. I believe that it has definitely inspired many in Gloucester. 

20160810_105527
DPW HQ on Poplar

 

THE FIRST CLEAN HARBOR SWIM

1979 Clean Harbor Swim002
1979

 

Thank you to Deborah Cramer and Dan Greenbaum for sharing this memory and finding this Gloucester Daily Times article! This trio’s swim inspired Cape Ann’s Year of the Coast led by MassAudubon the following summer.

Related posts:

8/13/16, race above same day: And they’re back

8/13/16, Celebrate Clean Harbor Swim, and they’re off

8/12/16 Gloucester’s Clean Harbor: H2O No No’s are in the past – some history of the swim

8/10/16 Accclaimed writer, Gloucester resident, and one of the trio that inspired the Clean Harbor Swim Sarah Fraser Robbins excerpt ( the title of her classic book The Sea is All About Us was a nod to Gloucester summer resident TS Eliot’ Four Quartets)

8/6/16 litter 1978 Crackdown at the quarries 

8/4/16 history of the swim and news about 2016 Celebrate the Clean Harbor Swim

RIO WATERS CAN GET BETTER! THANKS TO DOGGED NATURALISTS, WE CAN PUT OUR HEADS UNDER WATER IN GLOUCESTER. REGISTER NOW FOR THE AUGUST 13 CLEAN HARBOR SWIM

Isabel Babson

Photo by E.J. Lefavour

Isabel Babson (1577-1661) was the first Babson in America, and she and her sons Richard and James are the progenitors of all with that name in the country.  The earliest known record of her in this country is dated 25 September 1637 and appears in the Salem town records: “Isabell Babson desires admittance to become an inhabitant.”  Isabel probably first settled at Salem as it was her port of disembarkation. In 1942 she moved to Gloucester where she was greatly respected as a nurse and midwife. After July 1642 Isabel purchased land at what is now 75-77 Front Street, Gloucester, and it continued in the family about a century and a half. Her dwelling on Main Street, a little to the west of Porter Street, was located at what is now 69 Main Street.  She died and was buried in Gloucester, although the exact location of her grave is unknown.  A simple stone has been placed in the ancient Bridge Street Burying Ground in memory of this honored and beloved citizen of Gloucester.  As a tribute to her memory, Roger W. Babson established the Isabel Babson Memorial Library at 69 Main Street, which specializes in books for expectant mothers.  She is also remembered through the Isabel Babson Maternity Wing at Addison Gilbert Hospital in Gloucester.  Roger Babson believed that conceiving and rearing children, as well as the health and well-being of women, were critical to a stable society.  All books in the library reflect this philosophy.  Every challenging aspect of family living from prenatal through grandparenting and the golden years is covered.  Books catering to men’s issues are also available.