Cape Ann Museum July 25 |special lecture and new biography about American artist Nell Blaine by author Cathy Curtis!

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Alive Still: Nell Blaine, American Painter | A Talk with Author Cathy Curtis

The Cape Ann Museum, is pleased to present an illustrated talk by author Cathy Curtis about beloved Cape Ann artist Nell Blaine on Thursday, July 25 at 7:00 p.m. This program is free for Museum members or $10 nonmembers. Reservations are required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10.

Alive Still: Nell Blaine, America Painter (Oxford University Press, 2019) is the biography of an artist who believed she was at the top of her game in 1959, when she traveled to Greece to paint. She had a great time . . . until she contracted the most severe form of polio and had to be airlifted to New York. A paraplegic at age thirty-seven, she was determined to regain her skills. Her coloristically brilliant, rhythmically vibrant style illuminated landscapes and still lifes that reflect her passion for the natural world. During the next three decades she would become a notable painter and one of America’s great watercolorists. In 1974, she purchased a cottage on Ledge Road, where she and her partner, painter Carolyn Harris, made the most of the splendid views available on Cape Ann.

Cathy Curtis is the author of two previous biographies of women artists, RESTLESS AMBITION: GRACE HARTIGAN, PAINTER (Oxford University Press, 2015) and A GENEROUS VISION: THE CREATIVE LIFE OF ELAINE DE KOONING (Oxford University Press, 2017). She earned a master’s degree in the history of art from the University of California, Berkeley, and wrote art criticism for many years. In 2018, she was elected to a two-year term as president of Biographers International Organization in 2018. Her website is www.cathycurtis.net

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Cathy Curtis

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum July 25 |special lecture and new biography about American artist Nell Blaine by author Cathy Curtis!”

Scenes from Jason Burroughs ebullient closing talk, Goetemann Artist Residency, Rocky Neck #GloucesterMA

“I’m happy out there, being in nature, spending time looking, painting and having fun.”

Jason Burroughs completed a rewarding month long Goetemann Artist Residency on Rocky Neck and is so appreciative of this generous honor. He enjoyed adjusting to painting with oil, outside, and the challenge of working so quickly to “get all the notes down” chasing light, tide and wind conditions before a moment he was after changed. “Building up marks, being able to paint fast, to do it in that time is an honorable achievement. And a challenge. I’m learning something with each one.” Burroughs went out as much as he could. He admires the speed and mechanics mastery of plein air greats he’s researched, and artists working now that he’s getting to know and pepper with questions or simply paint alongside. He’s riveted when Jeff Weaver talks about the history of a building or scene. During this residency he was grateful to have had the chance to join Stephen LaPierre and Caleb Stone for a couple of plein air outings. He loves having a base in Rocky Neck, the architecture of Gloucester’s waterfront, pilings, boats, masts, popular  scenes & motifs, repetitive forms, and the energy and vibe of being around other artists. He relished solo time in the field, even the time he got a sunburn working on one of the larger paintings: “I was standing out there 7 hours throwing paint down. I got to pick my site, overlooking the waterfront, in nature. (I saw bunnies and bluejays. So peaceful. It was great!) You go through so much white. So much. And trial and error. I’m just hoping to find ways of painting that will bring some of the truth of what I’m seeing.  I need to know if something is wrong and why. Some I leave rugged. Putting in the work is so important.”

photos: Snapshots of Jason Burroughs readying a couple of days before his Goetemann Artist Residency closing talk, and from his presentation and Q&A, standing room only, well received and topped off by several painting sales. His good friend, David Brooks, filmed and beamed throughout. 

SOLD red dots underway

 

A couple of days before the closing talk

 

Kids and family program featuring Barbara McLaughlin TOHP Burnham Library Essex May 31 4pm

 

 

For all those interested in the progress of the Cape Ann Reads Children’s Book Contest story The Best Way Home, written and illustrated by Barbara McLaughlin, McLaughlin will be at the Burnham Library in Essex for a reading with an art demonstration and activities for young artists. 

Friday, May 31 from 4 – 5 PM, art materials will be provided 

Bring children and grandchildren ages 5 and up so they can share their budding talent!

Very best regards,

Barbara McLaughlin

John Abisamra Gallery 53

John Abisamra submits “Yesterday was the opening reception for Gallery 53 on Rocky Neck. New juried members from Gloucester include Melissa Cox and myself as photographers. There was a huge turnout for the event. Gallery 53 will remain open though mid October and has 28 artists displaying/selling their work. It’s right in the heart of Rocky Neck between the Rudder and Studio restaurants.  Great place to visit to see some magnificent art work!! I have attached a photo of my work and there are additional photos on the Gallery 53  website. The current Gallery 53 exhibit is entitled BLUE. Thanks for getting the word out about Gallery 53 through Good Morning Gloucester!”

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Cape Ann Art Exhibit at the State House curated by Karen Tibbetts | Reception May 8 reserve a seat on the bus!

State House_Boston MA_20180904_photo copyright Catherine Ryan

Cape Ann Art Exhibit
The State House and Senator Tarr will Honor Art and Artists of Cape Ann in a reception to be held at The State House in Senate Hall on May
8, 2019 at 10:00am -11:00 am.

The Cape Ann Art Exhibit portrays extraordinary talent and diversity in both media and vision. Each Artist has displayed a life of dedication to community, preserving, promoting and representing the Value of ART to our lives. This show is happening because of Karen Tibbetts. Featured artists of today and in tribute include 

Kathy Archer

Jill Armstrong

Jason Burroughs

Phil Cusumano

Barb Duggan

Gordon Goetemann*

Judith Goetemann*

Ken Knowles

Gayle Macklem

John Nesta* (who we will be honoring)

TM Nicholas

Eileen Patten Oliver

Marty Swanson

Jeff Weaver

*for more information about these artists See Rocky Neck and Cape Ann Museum

Mayor Romeo Theken adds: “If anyone wants a ride to Boston we will have a bus leaving Gloucester at 8am.” To reserve a spot text 1 (617) 293-1295

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courtesy photo L – R  – State House kind help, Ken, Karen

FANTASTIC DAY!

With hurrying home from Boston after a full day of editing on the Monarch film project, I didn’t have time to write a longer post. It was a tremendously productive day. My film doesn’t just show Gloucester’s wildlife in a beautiful light, but highlights the natural beauty found all around Cape Ann.

Without jinxing the project I feel hopeful we will have a documentary by spring. No dates have been decided as of yet, but I am getting pretty excited to premiere the final cut!

RESCUED MINKE WHALE PHOTOS FROM AL BEZANSON AND IMPORTANT MARINE STRANDING MESSAGE FROM NOAA

Minke Whale Smith’s Cove Gloucester Harbor

Green Dragon Schooner Captain Al Bezanson, who first alerted GMG to the Minke Whale temporarily grounded at Gloucester Harbor, shares his photos and observations. Ainsley Smith, NOAA’s Marine Animal Response Coordinator, shares information on what to do if you see a whale, dolphin, or seal stranded or in distress. With so many whales currently feeding off our shores, as well as the extreme number of seal deaths, we appreciate Ainsley’s advice.

Al writes, “The whale looked to be a juvenile about ten feet long, I thought. Perhaps confused by running aground and kept trying to forge ahead. I did not see the rescue but turning him or her was probably the key to freedom, and moving a rock would provide the space.”
Ainsley writes, “Yesterday morning, a small minke whale got stuck in less than 2 feet of water in Smith Cove, Gloucester. The beaching was reported to us at around 8 a.m., and our Stranding Coordinator immediately left for the scene. The situation was also reported to the harbormaster, the animal control officer, and NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement.

By the time our Stranding Coordinator arrived at 8:30, we are told that a local resident had moved a large boulder that appeared to be preventing the whale from returning to deeper water. Our Stranding Coordinator, along with the harbormaster, Gloucester animal control officer, and NOAA OLE agent, then searched for the whale throughout the harbor, but were unable to find it again, which is good news! We are hoping the whale made it back to deep water safely.

We appreciate the outpouring of concern for this whale, and understand that it is very hard to watch a whale struggle. We feel the same way, which is why we are in this line of work!

This is a good opportunity to remind everyone that, under federal law, specifically the Marine Mammal Protection Act, only authorized responders are allowed to interact with stranded marine mammals. Often, marine mammals strand because they are in distress, and a trained responder will best know how to evaluate and help the animal. Pushing an animal back into the water may delay treatment or response, and also limits our ability to gather important information to be able to best help. For example, an entangled minke whale was reported near Gloucester last week, so it would have been valuable to examine this whale for injuries and see if it may have been the same one.

Whales in distress can also be dangerous, as they are unpredictable and very powerful. People have been seriously injured or killed trying to help, which is another reason we ask that people wait for trained responders.

The best thing you can do to help a marine mammal in distress is call the NOAA hotline (866-755-6622) or your local stranding response partner, and stand by the animal until help arrives.

Additionally, if people see a marine mammal in an unusual place (like a busy harbor or shallow water), please report it to the hotline so it can be monitored and we can alert people in the area to help keep it safe. We heard several reports yesterday after the stranding that a whale had been seen in the harbor earlier the week, but no one had reported it to us.” 

Minke Whale Smith’s Cove Goucester Harbor Al Bezanson Photo

BREAKING: STRANDED MINKE WHALE RESCUED GLOUCESTER HARBOR

Minke Whale Image 7 Seas Whale Watch

Early this morning Al Bezanson reported that a Minke Whale was caught on a small rock in Smith’s Cove, next to the Studio Restaurant. A kind group of Rocky Neck neighbors removed the rock and the whale swam away instantly. The whale appeared to be recovering from its entanglement and, as Mona Faherty reports, did an arcing dolphin-like move after swimming to the middle of the Cove.

The small rock, about a foot and half, that entangled the whale.

The Minke may possibly be injured. Please keep an eye out and if you see the whale contact the Northeast Marine Mammal hotline at 866-755-6622. Thank you!

NOAA official Ainsley Smith and Animal Control Officer Teagan Dolan looking for the whale.

Stephen LaPierre reception Sunday August 26 | New work inspired by Rocky Neck

Stephen LaPierre Rocky Neck Plein Air Collection

Stephen LaPierre studio-gallery, 75 Rocky Neck Avenue, 2nd Floor (next to the Rudder), Gloucester, Massachusetts

Reception Sunday August 26, 2018 from 12PM – 9PM – Clam-Digging Mermen, four-piece group (banjo, guitar, fiddle and stand-up bass) will be playing folks, blues and jug from 4-7PM

photos and more information about the series from the artist’s press release:

“Stephen has completed a dozen paintings of the Neck, this past spring and summer…trying to capture the dwindling historic architecture.. still remaining along the Neck’s lanes and shore,  as well as capturing current day village and harbor views”

Continue reading “Stephen LaPierre reception Sunday August 26 | New work inspired by Rocky Neck”

Boston Globe comes to #GloucesterMA for a perfect weekend

“How to spend a perfect weekend in Gloucester and the other cape”, by Christopher Muther, Boston Globe. 

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Article describes some Gloucester highlights: Cape Ann Museum and Harrison Cady exhibition, Gloucester Beaches, Stage Fort Park, Half Moon Beach, Gloucester Shuttle, Cape Ann Cinema, Gloucester Stage, Schooner Thomas E. Lannon, Hammond Castle Museum, Perfect Storm, Wicked Tuna, Rocky Neck, Latitude 43, Lobsta Land, Zeke’s Place, Willow Rest, Beauport Hotel, Ocean Hotel at Bass Rocks, Beth Williams, and (couldn’t get a reservation at) Duckworth’s Bistro.

detail from Harrison Cady on exhibit Cape Ann Museum through October 2018 ©c ryan.jpg
Detail from Harrison Cady on exhibition Cape Ann Museum