BREAKING: LARGE MARINE MAMMALS OFF GOOD HARBOR BEACH – DOLPHIN OR WHALE OR BOTH? AN OSPREY SWOOPS IN TO FEED, AND PIPL UPDATE

On my morning PiPl check, I met up with a super nice gentleman, Bill, who walks the beach every morning. He loves wildlife (including PiPls), is a Coast Guard veteran, was a fisherman, and grew up on a marsh. Bill pointed out the whale (or he thought possibly a large dolphin), breaching and blowing blow holes off in the distance. Bill mentioned there had been a crowd along the back shore earlier and that there is tons of good bait fish off the coast right now.

Can a marine specialist please help us identify what we are looking at. Please comment in the comment section if you have a moment. Thank you so much!

Editor’s Note – Piping Plover volunteer monitor Val Cabral shares that this is a Humpback Whale. Thank you Val for writing!

How exciting at see an Osprey swoop in and snatch up a large fish precisely where the whales were fishing. All were too far away to get some really fine shots, but you can at least get an idea from the photos.

PiPl Update- all three fledglings are doing beautifully on this, their 39th day 🙂 The three spent the hours of five to seven mostly foraging in the area front of the enclosure, and also preening within the enclosure. Papa was on the scene, too.

July 10, 2019 Good Harbor Beach Sunrise

I wonder what kind of fish is bringing out the whales and the Osprey?

FISHERMAN OF THE SKY

While filming PiPls, from high overhead came the shrilly distinct call of an Osprey. As majestic in flight as a Bald Eagle, he perused the beach and then circled back several times more. I wondered, is he coming for Piping Plover chicks or possibly the creche of Common Eider ducklings that was sweeping the shoreline for sea lettuce.


Creche of Common Eiders foraging for sea lettuce.

When I returned home I read Osprey pose very little threat to baby birds. Ninety-nine percent of their diet is fish and only rarely do they hunt other creatures, mostly when fish are not available. Commonly called Fish Hawk, Sea Hawk, and River Hawk, Osprey have evolved with such highly specialized physical characteristics to aid in hunting fish that they have been given their own taxonomic genus and family (Pandion haliaetus)

To learn more about Osprey, you may find John J. Audubon’s life history super interesting: Fish Hawk, or Osprey

Link to Essex Greenbelt live osprey cam: https://ecga.org/Osprey-Cam

Piping Plover chicks make easy targets for avian predators, but not Osprey 🙂