SNAPSHOTS OF WBZ CARL STEVENS AND POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS FOUND

As part of my Piping Plover project, I often stop by Revere and Winthrop beaches when heading to and from job sites in Boston and Cambridge. While at Revere Beach yesterday, several TV news trucks pulled up in front of the police station and cameramen set up their cameras. I imagined perhaps another whale had washed ashore but bones of what are believed to be human have been collected by police.

I briefly met WBZ’s Carl Stevens and cameraman (both super nice). So sorry I didn’t get the cameraman’s name for the photo caption. If anyone knows, please write.

I didn’t have time to stick around and learn more although not much else is know at this time. 

WBZ’s Carl Stevens and cameraman on the scene

Point of Pines loster boat heading in

POOR LITTLE BABY SEAL AT NILES BEACH

The little seal pup was seen today washed ashore at Niles Beach. He couldn’t have been more than three feet in length. From Maine to Massachusetts, more than six hundred dead or dying Gray and Harbor Seals have been reported this summer.

Two Humpback Whales washed ashore on Massachusetts beaches in a single day, one on Little Brewster Island in Boston Harbor and one on Revere Beach. The Revere Beach Humpback is the same whale that was spotted off Gloucester several weeks ago. Last week, two dead Minke Whales were found floating in the waters off Gloucester and Sea Bright, New Jersey. Another Minke Whale washed ashore in Rye, New Hampshire earlier this past week.

Seal Pup at Niles Beach

Read more about why the seals are dying here.

Two dead humpback whales wash up in Revere and near Boston Light

2016-2018 Humpback Whale Unusual Mortality Event along the Atlantic Coast

GOOD MORNING FROM THE 15th ANNUAL REVERE BEACH INTERNATIONAL SAND SCULPTING FESTIVAL!

While filming wildlife over the past week at Revere and Winthrop Beaches, it has been fascinating to see the sand sculptures taking shape for this weekend’s festive International Revere Beach Sand Sculpting exhibit and competition. The theme is “Celebrating Literacy,” and the sculptors have created interpretations of favorite works of literature written for children, teens and adults.  A storybook castle is the centerpiece of the exhibit. It’s all so beautifully ephemeral. The whimsical sculptures will be gone next week.

The festival begins today, Friday, July 20th and runs through Sunday, July 22nd. A ferris wheel and merry-go-round add to the fun, and a fireworks display over Revere Beach is scheduled for Saturday night. The event is free and open to the public. Attached is the complete schedule. For more information visit: http://reverebeachpartnership.com/

Sculptors include:

Helena Bangert of the Netherlands

Deborah Barrett/Cutulle of Saugus, Mass.

Mélineige Beauregard of Quebec, Canada

Jonathan ‘Jobi’ Bouchard of Montreal, Canada

Enguerrand David of Belgium

Ilya Filmonstev of Russia

Remy Hoggard of Bulgaria

Paul Hoggard of England

Sue McGrew of Tacoma, Washington

Fergus Mulvany of Ireland

Pavel Mylnikov of Moscow, Russia

Rachel Stubbs of England

Steve Topazio of Tiverton, Rhode Island

Abe Waterman of Prince Edward Island, Canada

Jaku ‘Kuba’ Zimacek of the Czech Republic

LEARNING ABOUT HOW MASSACHUSETTS COMMUNITIES MANAGE NESTING PIPING PLOVERS

To better understand how to help Gloucester’s Good Harbor Beach Piping Plovers survive nesting at our most well loved and highly trafficked beach I have been following a little Plover family at Revere Beach. 

Like Gloucester, Revere is a city north of Boston. Only ten square miles, with six miles of land, four miles of water, and a population of 52,000 people, Revere is a much more densely populated city than Gloucester. Gloucester’s year round population is 28,000, covering an area of 41 square miles, with 26 miles of land and 15 miles of water.

Revere Beach is the first public beach established in America (1895). Misperceptions about a needle and trash littered shoreline are deeply held but in reality, Revere Beach is a beautiful beach, beautifully maintained.

Each year Revere Beach hosts the International Sand Sculpting Festival, with amazing sculpting competitions, amusements, food, and fireworks. This year’s festival will be held on the weekend of July 20-July 22nd (photo courtesy wiki commons media).

Piping Plovers began arriving at Revere Beach at the same time the GHB PiPl arrived, in late-March and very early April. There are at least half a dozen nesting areas cordoned off for Piping Plovers. Revere has had excellent success with fledging Piping Plover chicks because the PiPl are allowed to establish nests early in the season, without disturbance. From decades of field work, it is known that the earlier the chicks hatch, the greater their chance of survival.

I stopped by to check on the Revere Beach PiPl family on a recent Sunday afternoon; it’s not that out of the way to make it part of my regular routine coming home from Cambridge and Boston jobs. And then stopped at Good Harbor Beach. The difference was astounding. There wasn’t any trash or dog poop on Revere Beach, and there wasn’t a dog anywhere along the five mile stretch of beach. There were however six dogs off leash at Good Harbor Beach within the twenty minutes that I was there to say hello to PiPl monitor Heather and to check on our PiPl parking lot family.

Perhaps you might not think a fair comparison; Revere Beach is much longer than GHB, and it is under the management of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation but I did not see a single DCR employee or officer policing Revere Beach that dog-and-trash-free Sunday afternoon.

Over the past several decades, communities throughout Massachusetts have been learning how to live with Piping Plovers. I am hopeful that the more we learn about the issues confronting the Piping Plovers, the Gloucester community will come together to take the steps to insure their safety and successful nesting. 

There are a great number of helpful signs at Revere Beach.

The triangular-shaped signs that are posted at the PiPl nesting areas are on the small side, only about 8 inches. 

Just like at Nahant Beach (above) many of the roped off areas at Revere Beach have three rows of roping.

At Revere Beach dogs are not allowed on the beach beginning April 1st. The rules are clearly posted at each and every entry to the beach. The signs and poles aren’t fancy and I imagine would be affordable and easy to obtain.

The Gabe and Gabby Family with their leashed dog on the boulevard, sitting next to a PiPl nesting area–no problem for this family to keep their dog off the beach during nesting season.

Plenty of trash barrels.

Some folks are under the false impression that the reason our GHB PiPl are nesting in the parking lot is because when they arrived it was cold and the parking lot hard pack is warm. Factually speaking, Piping Plovers arrived at beaches all along the Massachusetts coastline in mid-March and early April. As far as we know, the Good Harbor Beach PiPl are the Only Piping Plovers nesting in a parking lot.

Male Plover nesting at Revere Beach. The Revere Beach PiPl were creating their nest scrapes on the beach at exactly the same time our GHB PiPl were trying to establish a nest on the beach.

Just like our GHB PiPl family, it looks like there are four eggs in the Revere Beach nest!

Next time I stop to visit the Revere Beach PiPl family, I am going to have to bring home some Kelly’s roast beef sandwiches for dinner. I’ve heard the seafood is pretty good at Kelly’s, too!

Revere Beach is Boston Stong

The first sandcastle (of over a dozen) is in process, as seen here last night, on Revere Beach. The National Sand Sculpting Festival runs Friday – Sunday July 19-21.

http://www.celebrateboston.com/events/revere-beach-sand-sculpting-festival.htm

Photo © Kathy Chapman 2013

http://www.kathychapman.com

BostonStrongRevereBeachSandcastle