Castaways Vintage Cafe, 20 Rogers Street, #GloucesterMA opens May 22

New cafe and retail shop, Castaways Vintage Cafe, 20 Rogers Street (former Rogers St entrance to Dog Bar.) The Be Sargent’s Judith Sargent Murray mural is off to the right as you enter.

 

Above – exterior of new business- “Bohemian style cafe offering Killa Koffee, Beautiful Acai Bowls, & Vibin’ Vintage clothing”

Below – Before snapshots exterior parking lot view back to Main St (2012/2018)

 

 

Today’s paper: artist Leslie Galacar featured at Historical Museum

Once Upon a Contest is on view through April 26 at the Manchester Historical Museum for the Manchester Public Library leg of this travel exhibit.  Leslie Galacar created a site specific 4 part piece that will be displayed for the length of the Manchester run.

Read Gloucester Daily Times “Manchester illustrator featured at Historical Museum” here 

Leslie Galacar temporary works featured in GDT_20190420_Cape Ann Reads at Manchester Historical Museum

one of four Once Upon a Contest temporary public art works_copyright aritst Leslie Galacar Manchester MA.jpg

JASON BURROUGHS Goetemann Residency May 2019 intro talk May 6

 

Jason Burroughs Goetemann Artist Residency 2019 – Gloucester Invitational Artist month of May opening talk May 6th

Read more about Jason Burroughs here

Whether as sculptor, painter, muralist, mixed media or assemblage fine artist, Gloucester-born Jason Burroughs works across media with a signature touch. Can’t wait to see what happens from this residency. Follow him on Instagram- he’s been doing a weekly sketch on his instagram page @jazzyjburroughs

What would Jason do here?

Ever since I saw his inventive stepped paintings pre 2017,  I wonder what would Jason do here-

what would Jason do_20190216_ hoping for mural commission here police station _or at O'Maley  Gloucester MA.jpg

JASON BURROUGHS

2017 – inventive sculpture paintings stepped away from flat and vertical surfaces

 

or just about anywhere! I’ve written about the monumental walls at O’Maley ideal for professionally trained artists that are former Gloucester O’Maley grads–like Jason– at the start of their careers. Murals are common public art attractions. To date I have not seen one mural initiative with that focus. Clandenstine street art and graffiti art can break through. (Some practitioners are diametrically opposed to that commercial conceit.) Elite global street artists and muralists command hundreds of thousands of dollars through private and corporate sponsorships. Commissions this scale for young artists with degrees begin at $16,000. That’s a great our town endeavor/grant investment.

ideal-canvas-for-murals-by-former-alums-now-emerging-artists-art-school-grads-omaley-innovation-middle-school-gloucester-mass-feb-3-2016-c2a9c-ryan_100917-14
Monumental walls at O’Maley ideal canvas for murals by former alums now emerging artists / art school grads – O’Maley Innovation Middle School Gloucester Mass- Feb 3 2016

Read about the Parsons Street murals (wall) here.

ABOUT GOETEMANN GLOUCESTER INVITATIONAL ARTIST RESIDENCY –

Established in 2015, this one month residency is offered by committee invitation to an inspiring and highly deserving Gloucester artist. It is understood that artistic inspiration can be difficult to attain when work and family take precedence. The artist is provided with a live-work studio for one month. Read more here about Goetemann juried and invitational artist residencies 

The Cultural Center at Rocky Neck is open Thursday-Sunday. Seasonal Hours are: June through August 12-6pm, September through May 12-4pm.

Gallery 53 at Rocky Neck, 53 Rocky Neck Avenue is open seasonally May – October, seven days a week, 11am-6pm, Thurs-Sat until 8pm.

Visit www.rockyneckartcolony.org for more information. 

Stacy Boulevard: Walker Hancock Triton sculpture, Betty Smith gardens & tennis courts to the East, and Blynman Bridge & railings to the West – more stunning investment #GloucesterMA thanks to DPW, Ann Gilardi Johnson, Generous Gardeners, CPA, DOT

Gloucester, Ma.

There is much exciting work in progress along Stacy Boulevard including welcome tributes to women. Incremental aesthetic improvements, public access, ease of movement, and celebration of culture require many hands and deliver a huge impact. Here is a brief description of the special current projects and some people involved.

Two revitalized and enhanced gardens beyond the tennis courts will emphasize generations of care

“Remarkable support comes from volunteer expertise like award winning designer Ann Geraldi Johnson and Susan Kelly and the Generous Gardeners who have stepped up as the city’s groundskeepers on the boulevard.” Mike Hale, Director of Public Works 

The Elizabeth Gordon Smith (Betty Smith) garden was cleared and the small Picture garden past the boulevard tennis courts was unearthed. Because Gloucester garden groups pre-date 1900, it’s especially moving to see the work in progess shoring up inspiring legacy connections. Incredible volunteers past and present serve the city’s Department of Public Works (DPW). Stacy Boulevard & Stage Fort Park advocates like Betty Smith, Louise Loud & the Gloucester Civic & Garden Council tended and protected Gloucester’s natural beauty — the very same grounds that are so lovingly served now by dynamos like Ann Gilardi Johnson and Susan Kelly & the Generous Gardeners. Plaques for Lucy Brown Davis, tribute by her sister Catalina Davis, and for Lucy P. Rogers ” president of the Gloucester’s Woman’s Club 1927-29″ are nearby.

photos: Betty Smith garden IN PROGRESS February (overgrowth and clearing underway–poison ivy was found) vs. March and can’t wait to experience the AFTER!

Gloucester MA Department of Public Works directing restoration special gardens Stacy Boulevard _20190215_ sculpture Walker Hancock © catherine ryan (4)
February 2019
TRITON bronze scupture public art Stacey Boulevard Gloucester Ma_ artist Walker Hancock monuments man_ raised atop boulder base _20190324_© Catherine Ryan (12)
March 24, 2019 more progress two gardens revitalized- Paul Manship Triton fantastic enhanced boulder base clearing
TRITON bronze scupture public art Stacey Boulevard Gloucester Ma_ artist Walker Hancock monuments man_ raised atop boulder base _20190324_© Catherine Ryan (6)
Gloucester, Mass., March 2019. Pubic art – Walker Hancock Triton

 

 

 

Continue reading “Stacy Boulevard: Walker Hancock Triton sculpture, Betty Smith gardens & tennis courts to the East, and Blynman Bridge & railings to the West – more stunning investment #GloucesterMA thanks to DPW, Ann Gilardi Johnson, Generous Gardeners, CPA, DOT”

Stacy Boulevard: Walker Hancock Triton

March 2019 work continuing across Stacy Boulevard – read details HERE about  these projects– Hancock SculptureBetty Smith Gardens & Tennis Courts to the East, and Blynman Bridge & railings to the West-  additional stunning work and investment thanks to Gloucester MA Department of Public Works, Ann Gilardi Johnson, Generous Gardeners, CPA, Department of Transportation (DOT), and more.  Stacy Boulevard Part 8

TRITON bronze scupture public art Stacey Boulevard Gloucester Ma_ artist Walker Hancock monuments man_ raised atop boulder base _20190324_© Catherine Ryan (12)

March 24, 2019 photos of Walker Hancock Triton and grounds prep before/in process.

TRITON bronze scupture public art Stacey Boulevard Gloucester Ma_ artist Walker Hancock monuments man_ raised atop boulder base _20190324_© Catherine Ryan (6)
Gloucester, Mass., March 2019. Pubic art – Walker Hancock Triton

 

 

 

#GloucesterMA Public Art – last chance to Instagram temporary mural at Cape Ann Museum

 

portrait of Bonnie L Sylvester_ inspecting her public mural in process_Cape Ann Museum_ _20181214_© catherine ryan.jpg

Once Upon a Contest – Selections from Cape Ann Reads travel exhibition closes at Cape Ann Museum February 24, 2019. The radiant show has stopped people in their tracks to sit and read awhile. The show celebrates children’s picture books by local authors and artists. A temporary mural by Bonnie L. Sylvester has generated photos and selfies and will be painted over after the show closes.

below: installation and in progress views, Bonnie L. Sylvester painting temporary mural for Once Upon a Contest at Cape Ann Museum Gloucester Ma. 

“As part of the original creative design and concept for the Once Upon a Contest travel exhibition, artist Bonnie L. Sylvester was invited to create a public mural in three parts. After two years steeped in preparing final illustrations for the Cape Ann Reads Medal Book, The Tree in Dock Square written by Jean Woodbury and illustrated by Sylvester, the two week process for this Cape Ann tableau involved sketching key elements and applying layers of custom mixed paint for a walk in installation effect. This temporary wall mural is a first for the artist and the Cape Ann Museum.” 

Bonnie L Sylvester painting temporary mural installatin at Cape Ann Museum for Once Upon A Contest exhibition © Catherine Ryan.gif

Portrait of Bonnie L Sylvester painting temporary mural at Cape Ann Museum Gloucester MA_20181213_© Catherine Ryan.jpg

Public Art happiness is … Renowned Williamstown Art Conservation Center caring for historic Gloucester murals!

Thanks to Mayor Romeo-Theken, city officials & departments and staff, residents, volunteers, archives and generous grant awards & donations, — Gloucester’s extant historic mural collection has begun a new chapter and is beginning to receive most fitting care at the illustrious Williamstown Art Conservation Center!

Williamstown Art Conservation teams commence work for Gloucester MA_on its historic mural many WPA era _20180510_© Catherine Ryan.jpg
WACC conservation teams on the ground in Gloucester, MA, 2018

 

Located on the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute campus, The Williamstown Art Conservation Center​ (WACC) is a non-profit institution that was established as the regional conservation center for New England by the US government back in 1977.

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The Williamstown Art Conservation Center is located on the campus of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts. (architect Tadao Ando)

 

The summer 2017 issue of Art Conservator, WACC’s indispensable industry magazine, ​focused on the center’s 40th anniversary milestone and Director Tom Branchick. The back page prints the 2017 Center consortium members.

 

williamstown art conservation center member consortium 2017
Gloucester Massachusetts art collection stands with important American collections and just might be the first municipality on this list!~

You can peruse the issue here or follow the link to explore a complete digitized repository of current and past issues. The WACC website URL is: www.williamstownart.org

 

Conservators at the center assessed the condition  and performed necessary triage because of the invaluable support from the city’s Community Preservation Act (CPA). CPA funding and Williamstown Art Conservation Center’s stature are inspiring endorsements for broadcasting the project and compelling additional financial support. As money is raised, every mural will have its necessary care regimen completed. Donations in support of the mural care can be sent c/o the Auditor’s Office, City of Gloucester, 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA (note mural restoration). All murals will be displayed in Gloucester as soon as their care is completed.

Sneak peek then and now:

The former Eastern Avenue School (85 Eastern Avenue) was the site for the monumental mural, Schooldays, by Frederick L. Stoddard, from 1936.  This multi-panel triptych was painted 8 feet high and nearly 60 feet long despite an array of unusual architectural challenges. My hunch for its original location on the main floor was confirmed thanks to Barbara Tarr. I’m looking for interior photos of the school that show the mural installed. Over time the school walls were resurfaced, doors blocked, and an elevator installed. Based on my expertise, I recognized that a stand alone piece was misattributed and must have been dispersed, not as bad as the scarecrow in the Wizard of Oz after the flying monkeys descend-… still it was dire and will be amazing to have it whole once again! Special thanks go to Gloucester’s Department of Public Works.

catherine ryan correct attribution and rediscovery for major and amazing frederick l stoddard gloucester ma 1936 mural © catherine ryan

 

 

 

 

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, message about the superpower of art & culture

December 2018 looking ahead:

“We are on the front lines of a war on poverty. Not necessarily a shortage of material wealth, although its distribution in America is both a consequence and contributor to the current distress.

The poverty our field confronts every day is that which Robert Kennedy confronted while running for President in 1968. He contrasted the wealth represented in the nation’s gross national product with the wealth necessary to sustain a democracy and make life worth living. 

He said, “…the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

We are currently in one of the best economies in a generation, but studies show record declines in our sense of well-being. Worse yet, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. Major newspapers are sounding the alarm. In the Washington Post, George Will writes that loneliness, a major public health problem, is in “epidemic proportions” and that people are unhappier, more isolated and less fulfilled. David Brooks claims, in the New York Times, the biggest factor is the crisis of connection. We are “in a straight-up social catastrophe,” he writes. 
 
For nearly the last 20 years, those of us who advocate for the arts and culture have made the economy the centerpiece of our argument. We’ve collected economic impact data, counted the jobs we create and the taxes we generate, and touted our centrality to the tourism industry. We became the poster child of the creative economy. In an environment of it’s the economy stupid, these arguments won over state legislators and delivered budget increases to state arts agencies.

Five years ago, I wrote a column for a national arts blog suggesting that it was time to dial back the economic argument, even suggesting that there is something powerful about the intrinsic value of the arts. That the transforming power of culture is the power of creative expression, human engagement, and empathy. 

This is the poverty of our time. When Kennedy spoke of joy, beauty, intelligence, integrity, wit, wisdom, courage, compassion, and devotion he spoke of the ideals that are inherent in art and culture.

The arts and culture are the antidote to what ails us as a nation. In fact, they can both prevent and cure. Studies show that creative and cultural participation enhances human health and well-being leading to: reduced social isolation; opportunities for learning; calming experiences and decreased anxiety; more optimism, hope and enjoyment; increased self-esteem and sense of identity; increased inspiration and “meaning-making;” and better communication.

I can write about the studies and outcomes, but the heart is more articulate:
“It is a remarkable experience to witness a high school student watching a young adult with down’s syndrome or cerebral palsy offer a sonnet, and think to himself, ‘I want to do that. I want to have that kind of courage, that kind of conviction.’ Or to be a man or a woman of any age and watch someone you have typecast in your heart of hearts as somehow less than, stand in the center of a crowd and speak a truth about what it is like to dream of being seen for all of what you offer and know that a wall has just fallen…and through that kind of honest performance, know that you have been changed for the better,” writes Maria Sirois about Community Access to the Arts in Great Barrington, an organization that unleashes the arts in people with disabilities.

Music can help stroke victims regain their speech. You’re never too old to sing, or dance, or paint. Victims of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia find calm and clarity through the arts. Art is a universal language that bridges race, ethnicity, and culture – in a neighborhood, or across continents. The arts help explain the complexity of physics or climate change. Science and art are close cousins, sharing the bloodlines of creativity, risk taking, and problem solving.
 
Massachusetts cultural organizations are committed to serving everybody in the Commonwealth. They joined a new program this year to offer the benefits only the arts and culture can provide to people who have fallen on hard times and are receiving assistance through the state EBT card, a card that provides help to families living near the poverty level. Our organizations agreed to offer free or greatly reduced admission prices to EBT cardholders. In our first year, we tracked 220,000 EBT admissions. 

Nearly a quarter of a million doses of arts and culture to people in need. Again, the heart is in the stories. One concertgoer, who had not been able to attend a concert in years said, “It was nice to have a slice of my old life back.” Another said “It’s hard to describe the feeling of being able to do something ‘normal’ when everything else isn’t.”

The Mass Cultural Council is not an economic development agency, but when we do arts well, tourists visit and spend money, communities become destinations and better places to live, jobs are supported and created, innovators want to live here, and build new businesses.
 
The Mass Cultural Council is not an education agency, but when children have a quality experience participating in the arts, in school, and out of school, they exercise their creative minds, learn to think critically, are better observers and team players, and get a better education.

The Mass Cultural Council is not a human service agency, but when some of our most troubled youth participate in arts programs that give them a productive outlet for their fears and anger, provide a supportive community, build self-esteem and teach skills that will last a lifetime, these young people are saved from gangs, prison, drugs, even death.

In her book “Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum writes:

“Citizens cannot relate well to the complex world around them by factual knowledge and logic alone. The third ability of the citizen, closely related to the first two, is what we can call the narrative imagination. This means the ability to think what it might be like to be in the shoes of a person different from oneself, to be an intelligent reader of that person’s story, and to understand the emotions and wishes and desires that someone so placed might have.”

Martha Nussbaum is a close reader of Aristotle, who defined the good life as one that was authentically meaningfully rich: rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, great accomplishment, and enduring achievement.

George Will writes of the crumbling of America’s social infrastructure and the need for new habits of mind and heart, new practices of neighborliness. David Brooks says, “It’s not jobs, jobs, jobs anymore. It’s relationships, relationships, relationships.” Real relationships, not virtual or transactional ones. True engagement of heart and mind.

The poverty we face is one we can defeat. Novelist Alice Walker once said, “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”
 
Story. Imagination. Empathy. This is our superpower: the power of culture.” – 
Anita Walker , Executive Director, Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) 

Visit the Mass Cultural Council website

Have a podcast listen – Creative Minds Out Loud:  podcast for art and Culture –  Informative and lively conversations with arts and cultural leaders. Creative Minds Out Loud is a project of the Mass Cultural Council, and is hosted by Executive Director Anita Walker. https://creativemindsoutloud.org

 

 

Countdown to Once Upon a Contest Reception at Cape Ann Museum

SAVE THE DATE! RECEPTION IS ONE WEEK AWAY

Cape Ann Museum reception for the four libraries of Cape Ann Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads travel show, Saturday, January 5th, 2019, 3-5PM

once upon a contest installation view_cape ann museum _20181222_c ryan.jpg

photo credit: Installation partial view of “Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads” travel show debuted at Cape Ann Museum, December 2018.  © c ryan

Photo shows from left to right: in the foreground illustration by Leslie Galacar for Where in the World is Catherine Abigail written by Michael LaPenna; illustration for “Why does my dog…” written and illustrated by Mary Rhinelander; back wall left hint of temporary public art mural by Bonnie L. Sylvester, a Cape Ann tableau as walk-in installation, by the manuscripts (Sylvester illustrated The Tree in Dock Square by Jean Woodbury); back wall right drawing for Beauty on the Wing written and illustrated by Kim Smith; illustrations by Juni VanDyke for two books from the If I were … series by James McKenna; and a lower left corner from an illustration for  The Best Way Home, written and illustrated by Barbara McLaughlin.

 

Gloucester Lobster Trap Tree – gather round

The lobster trap tree in downtown Gloucester at Main and Pleasant Streets basked in glorious early morning light and festooned with buoys hand painted by kids at Cape Ann Art Haven.

A welcome pause any time any vantage.

Gather round_lobster trap buoy tree morning light_Gloucester MA_vista to inner harbor from Main St_ 20181209_©c ryan

gather round_one Sunday morning lobster trap tree_Gloucester MA_ looking east end of Main Street downtown_20181209©c ryan Continue reading “Gloucester Lobster Trap Tree – gather round”

Deborah Redwood whale’s tail – Goetemann Residency Closing Talk at Ocean Alliance, Rocky Neck

Deborah Redwood will present her Goetemann Residency Closing talk tonight, September 28, 2018, 6pm, Ocean Alliance

A few weekly scenes observing her art’s impact in progress  

September 14, 2018

 

September 21, 2018

September 28, 2018 (different vantages, silhouettes, and scavenged intricacies portend  meaning and events)

 

Local artists featured in annual outdoor sculpture exhibitions

Fall art walks

September, Newburyport, MA: For the third year, Sinikka Nogelo’s art is featured in the Maudslay State Park annual outdoor sculpture exhibition . Reception and walk through with the artists tomorrow, 2-5pm.

Thru Oct 7, Harvard, MA: Liz Fletcher’s sculpture was selected for the 2018 annual Around the Pond and Through the Woods Outdoor Sculpture at Old Frog Pond Farm, Harvard, Massachusetts. The show closes October 7th. If you time it right you can also attend the annual Plein Air Poetry walk September 16, 2-4pm.  I’d love to see a Cape Ann Plein Air Sculpture and Poetry walk, perhaps through Dogtown, TS Eliot, beach, and Cape Ann Museum properties.

Thru Nov 4, Pingree School, S. Hamilton, MA: Look for works by Liz Fletcher, Michael Updike and Bart Stuyf in the ninth annual Flying Horse Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition at Pingree which opened September 1 and continues through November 4, 2018.

Maudslay State Park exhibit 2018

So Joey asked about the Parsons Street murals

 

 

Last year Joey wondered about the wall murals on Parsons (walkway between Main and Rogers) added after the 350ft’ street temporary mural.

You can listen to Joey here: GloucesterCast 243 Taped 9/25/17 Timestamped 43:38 Parson’s Street Mural

The Parsons Street wall murals were created by a lot of people including fine artists, teachers, and kids: Jason Burroughs, Laura Donworth, Kyra Moyer, Aiden Symes, Avery Mcniff, Teen Artist Guild, and Cape Ann Art Haven summer kids. One request from the building owner was that they include a reference to Gloucester’s Man at the Wheel as part of the overall composition. The long mural features iconic Gloucester architecture, history and themes (see the great whale!) . The Man at the Wheel depiction was pulled out and featured on its own; locals aware of the former owner’s affiliation with Sam Adams enjoyed the extra nod. Photos above are from 2015.

North Shore Magazine photographs of Gloucester including wall mural (from the whale end) April 2018

 

There are some Parsons Street before and 2015 in process here

 

Continue reading “So Joey asked about the Parsons Street murals”

Goetemann Artist DEBORAH REDWOOD to Construct a Large Whale’s Fluke at Ocean Alliance

News from Rocky Neck:

Goetemann Artist to Construct a Large Whale’s Fluke
Artist Talk: Tuesday, September 4, 7:00 PM
The Cultural Center at Rocky Neck, 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA
Public Construction Dates: September 10 ­ 28
On the Grounds of Ocean Alliance, 32 Horton Street, Gloucester, MA
Closing Talk: Friday, September 28, 6:00 PM
On the Grounds of Ocean Alliance, 32 Horton Street Gloucester, MA

Gloucester Ma—The Goetemann Artist Residency—a program of the Rocky Neck Art Colony, Inc. that provides artists from around the world a live/work space for a month at a time—is pleased to introduce its 2018 Environmental/Installation Artist, Australian Deborah Redwood.

To be considered for the 2018 month-long residency, artists submitted a proposal responding to the mission of Ocean Alliance, RNAC’s non-profit partner, which states in part: “Ocean Alliance strives to increase public awareness of the importance of whale and ocean health through research and public education.”

Redwood is the second Goetemann resident to work at the site following last year’s installation of a seven-foot tall Great Auk by Nathan Thomas Wilson. Redwood’s practice encompasses sculpture and installation that evokes a sense of play and comments on society’s waste. She graduated from the College of Fine Arts (Sydney) in 2006 and was awarded a one-year exchange program at Alfred University, in New York.

Beginning September 10 and continuing through September 28, visitors are invited to stroll down Horton Street to observe the artist while she constructs a large whale’s fluke (part of a whale’s tail) on the grounds of Ocean Alliance, site of the former Tarr and Wonson Paint Factory at 32 Horton Street, Gloucester. Using equipment donated by J&L Welding in Gloucester, Redwood will collect scrap metal and weld it into a sculpture rising about ten feet above the water’s edge. This is a wonderful opportunity to share an artistic experience with children while making them aware of the fragility of life in our oceans. Printed information about the artist and her process will be available on site.

Deborah Redwood is the latest artist at the Goetemann Residency and the public is invited to learn more about her work when she presents an Artist Talk on Tuesday, September 4, at 7:00 PM at the Cultural Center at Rocky Neck.

For the past decade Redwood has participated in group and solo exhibitions in Australia and overseas, including; Japan, China, India and the USA.  She has also attended several artist-in-residence programs, in New York, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Vermont, Jaipur (India), Wellington (NZ), Sydney and now, Gloucester, MA. This challenging month-long project wraps up with a Closing Talk by the artist for the public at the Ocean Alliance site (weather permitting) on Friday, September 28 at 6:00 PM.

Images:

Deborah Redwood – Spiraling Shell

Deborah Redwood – Starfish at Killalea

Deborah Redwood – At Work

 

 

 

Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema welcomes three more sponsors- 2 days till The Greatest Showman

Five free movie nights begin Wednesday July 11th, 2018- The Summer of Song!

City of Gloucester and Rob Newton, Cape Ann Cinema and Stage, announce the 2018 Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema free outdoor movies line up:

July 11 ::: The Greatest Showman
July 18 ::: Coco
July 25 ::: The Wizard of Oz
August 1 ::: The Beatles Yellow Submarine
August 8 ::: Footloose
July 11, 18, 25 and August 1 and 8. Rain dates  August 15 & 22

HarborWalk Summer Cinema Sponsors and Presenters include:

Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library, Sudbay Automotive, and 1623 Studios (Cape Ann TV) join North Shore 104.9, the Building Center; ToodeLoos! ; Doyon’s Appliance ; and Cape Ann Savings Bank  as HarborWalk Summer Cinema important sponsors. 

 

The Summer 2018 movie nights are presented by: Woodman’s of Essex;  DIVA; Cape Ann Lanes, The Cave Gloucester Mass: Cheese, Wine & Chocolate Shop, and Gloucester Auto Body.

FINAL SUMMER CINEMA POSTER.png

Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2018: the dates and titles for the free outdoor movies are…

City of Gloucester and Rob Newton, Cape Ann Cinema and Stage, announce the 2018 Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema free outdoor movies line up:

Fifth annual year- Save the dates! Five free movie nights begin Wednesday July 11th, 2018- The Summer of Song!

July 11 ::: The Greatest Showman
July 18 ::: Coco
July 25 ::: The Wizard of Oz
August 1 ::: The Beatles Yellow Submarine
August 8 ::: Footloose
July 11, 18, 25 and August 1 and 8. Rain dates  August 15 & 22

The 2018 series poster and movie flyers were designed by Ariana Puopolo for Jill Cahill, Community Development Director, and based on original designs by Chris Muskopf and C7A.

2018 poster by Ariana Puopolo with City of Gloucester MA community development and based on Chris Muskopf C7A original design.jpg

First up

gloucester HarborWalk SUMMER CINEMA.png

THANKS

Over 5000 Cape Ann residents attended Gloucester’s HarborWalk Summer Cinema series in 2017. Awesome North Shore 104.9 amps the pre-show festivities! The HarborWalk Summer Cinema series is presented by the City and Cape Ann Cinema & Stage with the support of  local businesses:

North Shore 104.9

The Building Center

ToodeLoos! (has participated every year!)

Doyon’s Appliance

and Cape Ann Savings Bank.

The Summer 2018 movie nights are presented by

Woodman’s of Essex;  DIVA; Cape Ann Lanes, The Cave Gloucester Mass: Cheese, Wine & Chocolate Shop, and Gloucester Auto Body.

Contact Rob at Cape Ann Cinema & Stage for partnership options

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Continue reading “Gloucester HarborWalk Summer Cinema 2018: the dates and titles for the free outdoor movies are…”

Boston Commons public art: Robert Gould Shaw – Mass. 54th Regiment by Saint-Gaudens | POW MIA Freedom Tree | Boston Massacre by Robert Kraus

Three memorial monuments along a small corner of the Boston Commons by the State House  remind us of those who gave their lives for freedom.

modest Freedom Tree POW-MIA tribute

 

“The Freedom Tree: With the vision of universal freedom for mankind this tree is dedicated to Joseph Dunn and all  prisoners of war and missing in action. 1976.”

Read more about Maureen Dunn’s advocacy on behalf of her husband, Lt. Joseph Dunn, Vietnam War. Find the book, The Search for Canasta.

Boston Massacre Crispus Attucks patriots memorial by sculptor Robert Kraus

“In the Granary Burial Ground, in Boston, rest the remains of Crispus Attucks, Samuel  Gray, Jonas Caldwell, and Samuel Maverick, who, together with Patrick Carr, led by Crispus Attucks, were the first Martyrs in the cause of Amerian Liberty, having been shot by the British soldiers on the night of the fifth of March, AD 1770, known as the Boston Massacre.” 

Crispus Attucks was a longshoreman and whaler regarded as the first casualty in the Boston Massacre (‘the first to defy, the first to die’). In 1888, the state appropriated $10,000 for the commission. Robert Kraus was the sculptor and he worked with the foundry, Henry Bonnard Company of New York. The base and obelisk are Concord granite.

“The monument is of Concord granite, twenty five feet six inches high, and measures ten feet six inches at the base. The pedestal, which is round, except where a rectangular projection is made tosupport the statue and receive the relief is eight feet two inches high. The bas-releif on the face of the pedestal represents the Boston Massacre in King street. In the foreground lies Crispus Attucks, the first victim of British bullets; the centre of the scene is the old State House, behind which may be seen the steeple of the old brick or First church, which stood on Cornhill, now Washington Street. In the Upper left-hand corner is the following inscription: “From the moment we may date the Severance of the British Empire. Daniel Webster;” and in the upper right hand corner, “On that Night the Foundation of American Independenc was laid. John Adams.” Under the relief on the base appears the date “March 5, 1770.” Above the bas releif stands “Free America.” With her left hand she clasps a flag about to be unfurled, while she holds aloft in her ‘right hand the broken chain of oppression, which, twisted and torn, is falling off the plinth. At her left side, clinging to the edge of the plinth, is an eagle. Its wings are raised, its beak is open, and it has apparently just lit. Its pose is in unison with the fiery spirit of its mistrees, shown in the serious, determined, and heroic gaze of her upturned face.”

( And crushing the crown under her ‘Spirit of America’ foot.)

Read the archived 1889 dedication program which includes a letter from Frederick Douglass 

Robert Gould Shaw Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial

Robert Gould Shaw Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial Boston Commons by Augustus Saint Gaudens_dedicated 1889 ©c ryan 2018 March 1_ (3)
Robert Gould Shaw – Massachusetts 54th Regiment memorial, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, dedicated 1897, Boston Commons. (photo shows one of the eagles– and in the background  quite nearby you can find the POW MIA Freedom Tree and the resited Boston Massacre memorial.)

Joshua Benton Smith pushed for a memorial beginning in 1865.  It took another 20 years for a sculptor to be commissioned. A dedicated committee selected sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The tribute was unveiled and dedicated on Memorial Day May 31, 1897 (called Decoration Day at the time). Frederick Douglass was in attendance; two of his sons were in the 54th regiment. The memorial was cast by the Gorham Company foundry in Providence, R. I., at a cost of $7,000. The Gorham Company was contracted for Gloucester’s Fisherman at the Wheel memorial by Leonard Craske, and the Joan of Arc WW1 memorial by Anna Hyatt Huntington.

from the National Parks:

“Saint-Gaudens always strove for perfection regarding realism. In this relief he wanted to show a range in facial features and age, as found among the men of the regiment. This was the first time a monument depicted blacks realistically, and not as stereotypes. He hired African American men to pose, and modeled about 40 different heads to use as studies. His concern for accuracy also extended to the clothing and accoutrements.

“Saint-Gaudens, however, worked slowly. A committee member complained in 1894, “. . . that bronze is wanted pretty damned quick! People are grumbling for it, the city howling for it, and most of the committee have become toothless waiting for it!” It would still be three more years until the unveiling. In answer to criticism, Saint-Gaudens wrote:

“My own delay I excuse on the ground that a sculptor’s work endures for so long that it is next to a crime for him to neglect to do everything that lies in his power to execute a result that will not be a disgrace. There is something extraordinarily irritating, when it is not ludicrous, in a bad statue. It is plastered up before the world to stick and stick for centuries, while man and nations pass away. A poor picture goes into the garret, books are forgotten, but the bronze remains to accuse or shame the populace and perpetuate one of our various idiocies.”– Augustus Saint-Gaudens

“Many of them were bent and crippled, many with white heads, some with bouquets… The impression of those old soldiers, passing the very spot where they left for the war so many years before, thrills me even as I write these words. They faced and saluted the relief, with the music playing ‘John Brown’s Body’…. They seemed as if returning from the war, the troops of bronze marching in the opposite direction, the direction in which they had left for the front, and the young men there represented now showing these veterans the vigor and hope of youth. It was a consecration.” – Augustus Saint Gaudens

 

Motif Monday- how about monumental murals at O’Maley by art school grads that were former alumni

The O’Maley Innovation Middle School campus setting is rather bucolic. There’s a line of apple trees that still bear fruit and suggest the original farm, playing fields are stepped down surrounded by marsh and pond, Dogtown stretches along one edge, and Pole Hill rises up across the way. Community volunteers and students have created lovely decorative gardens. Yes, the track needs work and the playing field could be upgraded to turf like Gloucester High School’s New Balance-Newell Stadium. But it’s a beautiful spot to walk or catch a game. Ed Tedesco designed O’Maley in 1971. Although I believe the architect was quite sensitive to the setting, I understand how people criticize the exterior as harsh, or worse. “It feels like a prison!” exclaim some (and others joke. It is a middle school afterall.) You know what I see on the exterior when I come to O’Maley? Beautiful walls. Interesting shapes. Expansive public space ready for art and ideas.

O’Maley walls, photos from 2015

ideal canvas for murals by former alums now emerging artists art school grads - O'Maley Innovation Middle School Gloucester Mass- Feb 3 2016 ©c ryan_100917 (13)

You can’t judge a book by its cover. OR can you? O’Maley has the potential for its shell to match the creative arts and legacy at its core. There are stunning historic murals from the 1930s and 40s in the Commons. The arts curriculum is valued and celebrated. The arts teachers are amazing. If there is any school in Massachusetts that sings out arts and legacy, let it be here. Monumental public art and street art abound in Gloucester.

Parsons Street before, after, and after

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public art in Gloucester, MA and context collages

 

Py$eMoNeY117- skribbleFish- 21st century -orphans-Gloucester-Massachusetts- ©c ryan_20170107_114218.jpg
Py$eMoNeY117 21st Century Orphans, Gloucester, MA, Skribble Fish – graffiti art – not street art

And not just for flat surfaces. Artists have suggested creative responses to Americord’s striated surface like a piano keys mural along the wall (a motif you may have seen elsewhere); others proposed a changing light installation when the cultural district designation was underway. 

Stephanie Benenson’s temporary installation Harbor Voices at City Hall

Stephanie Benenson Gloucester MA Harbor Voices temporary public art light social sculpture immersive at City Hall.gif

Street art has become big business. Cities and towns around the world vie for renowned muralists in a competitive commercialized market with varying degrees of success.

street-art-seth-globepainter-julien-malland-34__700

I vote Former Alumni

O’Maley Innovation Middle School has the perfect walls for showcasing creative voices of former alumni who are art school grads (or currently enrolled)– professionally trained and inspired to leave a mark. Ever since the dynamite 18UP and Under 30 exhibition, supporters hoped to catalyze possibilities for these emerging artists. Murals taken to this scale warrant investments of $15,000 per artist per wall.

SONY DSC
Jason Burroughs https://www.jasonburroughsgallery.com/

just a few of the grads…Chris Budrow | Kate BresnahanJason Burroughs | Lexi Chipperini |Jon Cooney | Jeff Cluett | James Curcuru | Nicole Dahlmer | Leon Doucette | Alessia LoGrasso | Avery McNiff | Micah O’Conner| Mary Sullivan

Before I saw walls of possibility. I still see that, but now I imagine specific artists and I hope you do, too. There are plenty of walls to go around at O’Maley.

 

 

a few more international street art mural examples

Continue reading “Motif Monday- how about monumental murals at O’Maley by art school grads that were former alumni”

Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!

All are invited to have fun, join in, share ideas for Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary possible celebrations in 2023. A public meeting will be held at City Hall on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 1-3pm. Can’t attend? Email your input to the 400th steering committee: email gloucester400@gmail.com  and check out the 400th Anniversary Facebook page For More Info

“Although Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary is five years away, we know that those years will go by quickly.  400 years deserves a year long celebration in 2023 and a steering committee has been meeting for the last six or seven months to get the process started. Three Captains have been chosen to lead the group:  Bruce Tobey, Bob Gillis and Ruth Pino. The Committee is sponsoring a public meeting on Saturday April 28, 2018 in City Hall Auditorium…What should happen during 2023? What would you participate in? What would you miss if it didn’t happen?” 

With so much advance notice, it’s fun to ruminate. Three words come quickly to mind for one idea: Virginia Lee Burton. Burton was one of the most influential children’s book author-illustrators of the 20th century and Folly Cove textile designer and founder. She received the Caldecott medal in 1943 for The Little House. Whether for the 400th Anniversary or not, I hope one day that there are tribute commissions for Virginia Lee Burton’s beloved characters Katy from Katy and the Big Snow and Mary Ann from Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel at Stage Fort playground.  Life Story and Song of Robin Hood were also informed by landscape and her life in Gloucester. (The Burton tributes could be massive, interactive and accessible bronze sculptures. Tom Otterness commissions were completed at this scale. Why not Burton? They don’t have to be. Also bring back the monumental sea serpent and the big truck. These memorable imaginative expressions were wood in the past and maintained for years. Perhaps they could be recreated with modern decking materials. And add in Burton’s Little House! )

 

Archives

May 1923 Gloucester Daily Times covers down to the wire plans tercentenary Gloucester Mass.jpg

Gloucester has a history of producing major anniversary celebrations which makes looking back through archives* inspiring for future plans. Here are a few I’ve pulled:

*digitizing Gloucester Daily Times and Gloucester’s municipal archives is another oft repeated plea of mine and others–am sending that one along to a 400th dream wish list…

1892

Link to Gloucester’s 250th memorial celebration BOOK: https://archive.org/stream/memorialofcelebr00glou

1942

August 16, 1942– the city’s second (!) Tercentenary Celebration.

 

1923 Fighting for public art –  the Fisherman at the Wheel memorial commission

On May 21, 1923, the Gloucester Daily Times published an article about the appropriations and planning for the city’s 300th Anniversary which is remarkable in content and its late date–the celebration was just months away!  The idea itself and related costs concerning a public art commission –the one that would become Gloucester’s renowned Fisherman at the Wheel Memorial– were hammered out at a heated City Council meeting. Here’s the nearly complete transcription:

COUNCIL RECONSIDERS AND VOTES $5000 TO CELEBRATION: Equal Amount Will Be Reserved for Permanent Memorial Fund–Executive Committee Held Prolonged and Animated Session Saturday Evening. May 21, 1923 (*note ______ indicates illegible copy)

After three hours of discussion and a conference of the municipal council behind closed doors lasting about three-quarters of an hour on Saturday evening, it was voted to reconsider their action whereby the $10,000 appropriated for the anniversary committee should be alloted for a permanent memorial and voted for _____ committee to expend a sum not exceeding $5000 for the celebration, and the other $5000 to be used for the creation of a permanent memorial.

The agreement as finally reached is ______________ provide for the dedication in whole or in part of a permanent memorial to be erected and paid for jointly by the _______ city of Gloucester. “The municipal council agrees that a sum of $5000 of the amount appropriated by the city for the celebration will be for the general purposes of the committee if necessary, with the understanding that all expensea for additional police protection incurred by the  committee on public safety will be paid for by the anniversary committee. And with the further understanding that the anniversary committee will do all possible to have this sum of money applied to the permanent memorial in addition to the sum reserved ____ by the municipal _____ surplus after the celebration is over, this surplus also to be for the purpose of a permanent memorial.” The meeting opened at 8.15 o’clock, with a reading of the records by Secretary Harold H. Parsons, and following this there came without hesitation_____ ing of the celebration from those present, and for a time, one was reminded of the old town meeting days. ___________ A Piatt Andrew ___________ carnival parade by members of the art colony of the city were accepted and adopted. 

Plain Talk by Chairman Barrett-  Chairman Barrett then arose and addressed the members present and said: “I sent a communication to the municipal council some time ago to find out just what standing this celebration had with them. The letter I received was not

Continue reading “Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!”