Gloucester Manship Artists Residency + Studios nominated for a Commonwealth Award

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The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) announced 13 finalists vying for the Massachusetts 2019 Commonwealth Awards including Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester, Mass!

press release from MARS:

The Manship Artists Residency + Studios aka MARS is a finalist for the 2019 Commonwealth Awards. Announcing the thirteen 2019 finalists, Mass Cultural Council Executive Director Anita Walker said “​The Commonwealth Award is the highest honor in the arts and culture in Massachusetts. It is a celebration of the best of the best and a demonstration of the Power of Culture to enrich us all. This extraordinary group of awardees exemplifies our state’s unique cultural fabric. Their collective and individual achievements have made us a better Commonwealth.”
​ The Manship Artists Residency + Studios is recognized as an exemplary grassroots effort that brought together the skills, talents, and resources to save a local treasure with national importance as an innovative cultural resource for today and for future generations.

Established as a national and international, interdisciplinary artists residency and cultural hub, MARS has been developing partnerships and alliances with local, regional and international organizations in order to enrich and enhance existing public offerings, as well as to introduce new and exciting creative opportunities. For example, the first cohort of artists that worked at the Manship site were selected by a curator of the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy in Andover and were included in an exhibition there on sculptor Paul Manship’s legacy this past fall and winter. ​Local artists also will benefit in many ways – indeed, the first “visiting” artist in January 2017 was Gloucester resident Diane KW. And, among the first “resident’ artists who will begin to stay at the Manship home as soon as renovations are completed on the residence this Spring is Lara Lepionka, a Gloucester artist and social justice activist, who has achieved wide acclaim for her award-winning nonprofit, Backyard Growers.

In addition to visiting and resident artists, MARS welcomes other innovators and cultural leaders. Thus far MARS has hosted a Smithsonian museum conservator, a Metropolitan Museum curator, an independent Maine filmmaker, as well as a dance troupe from New York City. In July 2018, MARS’ hosted its first public event: Quarry Dance VII, a collaboration with Windhover Performing Arts Center attracted over 1000 guests to four free public showings of the site-specific performance. MARS will offer similar signature public events each summer, including exhibitions, installations and performances. The first exhibition at MARS will open the house to the public with artwork by Willie “Loco” Alexander. While Willie is known internationally as a musical pioneer, few have had the pleasure of experiencing his paintings and collages first-hand. MARS is also engaged in educational outreach. Thanks to a generous donor, MARS purchased an original Folly Cove Designer Acorn Press and has loaned this cultural treasure to the O’Maley Innovation Middle School for the use of local students and artists. This loan compliments the Folly Cove Designer (FCD) curriculum that was established in the schools by the Cape Ann Museum several years ago.
MARS Advisor Catherine Amidon commented that “​It is always exciting and inspiring when a young organization such as MARS receives recognition for their achievement along with a prominent list of seasoned and accomplished cultural colleagues. MARS’ success is a tribute to the support and guidance of the Mass Cultural Council, and to the generosity of local artists and collaborators, of donors who have invested wisely and who wanted to support the hard work of MARS’ board members, their advisors, and the incredible volunteers who have brought MARS this far in such a short time. Were it not for this collective effort, MARS would not be here today.​ ”

● For more information on the MCC Commonwealth Awards contact ​Carmen Plazas​, Communications Manager, 617-858-2738.

● For the Manship Project, contact Rebecca Reynolds, Founder and Board President, (978) 290-8438. MARS’ web site is ​www.manshipartists.org Follow @manshipartists on facebook, twitter and instagram

GMG Paul Manship historic artist home and studio purchase Sept 2017 

Manships exhibition and fundraiser for MARS

Essex National Heritage Trails & Sails 2018 starts this weekend!

FREE Trails & Sails events throughout Gloucester, Cape Ann and all of Essex County during two upcoming weekends September 21-23 & 28-30, 2018!

dsc_0167.jpg3rd Annual Phyllis A Marine Association Art Show and Sale  Hosted by Phyllis A Marine Association
Climb Up City Hall Tower, Hosted by Gloucester City Hall Restoration Commission

 

Historic Ice House Guided Tours Hosted by Cape Pond Ice Company

rafe.jpgOcean Views Walk from Ravenswood to Rafe’s Chasm Hosted by Cape Ann Trail Stewards

 

Sustainable Foraging: Wild Food and Medicine by the Sea Hosted by Gloucester’s Magnolia Library & Community Center & Iris Weaver

 

IPSWICH Come Paint with Me Decorative Painting Demonstration, Hosted by Johanne Cassia, American Folk Artist, AnnTiques’ owner. Co-founder of the Woman Owned Businesses Along the Essex Coastal Scenic Byway trail map celebrating street level, local women retailers from Gloucester, Essex, Ipswich and Rowley who share a regional ‘Main Street’ – Route 133/1A, part of the gorgeous 90 mile Essex Coastal Scenic Byway

10_1930293_zm.jpgANDOVER: Addison Gallery of American Art Gallery Talk: Paul Manship and His Artistic Legacy  Manship Artists Residency + Studios (MARS) President Rebecca Reynolds and Addison Gallery Associate Director and Robert M. Walker Curator of Art before 1950, Emerita Susan Faxon will discuss the significant work of Paul Manship, his influential presence in Gloucester, and his connection to the Addison.

Essex National Heritage Trails and Sails 2018

LIVE: James Prendergast Library only sold 3 at Sotheby’s! Rockwell fetches 6.2 million

Christie’s and Sotheby’s held dueling LIVE auctions on November 21, 2017. Christie’s American sale offered 93 lots resulting in $34,131,500 total sales, nearly 7x the total sales of Sotheby’s which featured less than 67 lots because the Berkshire Museum lots were pulled from the sale. Sotheby’s* failed to sell more than 1/2 of the first 45 lots. I’ll update after the sales have ended. *Sotheby’s sale is now closed. The auction house sold just 34 of 67 lots, total sales  (including Buyer’s Premium) were $5,858,250. Christie’s sold 72 of 91 lots today.

It turns out that the James Prendergast Library deaccession (see prior GMG post) would have made more money and kept the art in Jamestown if they had not brought the art to market at Sotheby’s. Here are the three of  nine paintings to find collectors; two went under estimate.

 

One of Sotheby’s best lots today was a Dame Laura Knight which sold for $560,000, right within its estimate range.

dame laura knight  BRIT 1877-1970 The Fairground Penzance ca 1912 oc 55 x 75 sotheby's last sold in 1983 est 400 to 600000.jpg

Hammer prices unless otherwise indicated:

Christie’s Lot 15 Norman Rockwell What Makes it Tick, a 1948 oil on canvas, sold for 6.2million  (just above its pre sale high estimate, 4 million to 6 million) which came to $7,287,500 after buyer’s premiums were factored. Rockwell’s Returning from Camp fetched 1.9 million. A Winslow Homer Tynemouth watercolor fetched a hammer price of $170,000, above its presale estimate range of 100,000-150,000. The Martin Johnson Heade failed to sell; the Milton Avery self portrait went for $45,000 at the gavel drop; and the Paul Manship sculpture was unsold, bidding failing to climb past $240,000 (pre sale estimate was $300,000 to $500,000.)

 

Berkshire Museum on hold, but James Prendergast Library a go

On November 21, 2017, Sotheby’s (New York) will be holding a European sale and Christie’s (New York) will be holding an American sale. Both auctions feature works by artists with ties to Gloucester and neighboring shores, among them:

Christies Martin Johnson Heade 1819 to 1904 Haystacks oc 1878-1892 est 120 to 180000
Martin Johnson Heade (1819-1904) Haystacks, 1878-1892, oil on canvas, (Christie’s presale estimate $120,000-$180,000)
Paul Howard manship 1885-1966 Lying Doe cas 1932 est 300 to 500000
PAUL MANSHIP (1885-1966), Lying Doe, ca. 1932 (Christie’s presale auction estimate $300,000-$500,000)

There are a few Norman Rockwell works, including the classic What Makes it Tick (The Watchman), a 1948 commission for the watchmakers of Switzerland, oil on canvas. Christie’s presale estimate is 4 million – 6 million. Christie’s is offering a Cecilia Beaux 1916 portrait in its American online auction, ending tomorrow as well. It’s titled Mrs. Albert J Beveridge (Catherine Eddy/Lady Primrose) and measures 57 x 38. Bids open at $12,000 on this Beaux.

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Sotheby’s Nov 21 Auction a tale of two AGOs

The Berkshire Museum story has several updates. As a reminder, the Massachusetts Appeals Court ruled last week that the Berkshire Museum could not sell its artworks on consignment with Sotheby’s until the courts settle. The Berkshire Museum is pushing for an accelerated court case. They have issued a press release which I’ve posted below the break. One trustee has quit in protest of the Museum’s intent to sell. The Massachusetts Attorney General office filed responses. It’s been reported that the AG is repeating unanswered requests for archives, financial papers and other material as well as questions related to museum contruction projects completed by another board member (speculating unconfirmed reports of conflict of interest.) Official filings and documents from both sides have been shared with media outlets. The injunction decision impacted Sotheby’s American and Impressionism & Modern art sales last week, and its European sale tomorrow only in that there are fewer lots for sale. The cover of tomorrow’s European sale catalogue featured a Berkshire Museum painting, Lot 18 now unavailable.

x LOT 18 Berkshire Museum Bouguereau featured on the cover of the Sotheby's catalogue 70 lots Nov 21 sale L'Agneau Nouveau-Ne THE NEWBORN LAMB oc 65 x 34 est 1500000 to 2mil.jpg
Sotheby’s lists Lot 18 as “upcoming” sale. Bouguereau L’Agneau Nouveau (The Newborn Lamb) oil on canvas, 65 in x 34 in (Sotheby’s presale estimate 1.5million to 2 million)

 

Additional Sotheby’s Berkshire Museum lots described as “upcoming”, on hold till the courts decide:

 

Sotheby’s European sale features fine art consigned from another public repository: the James Prendergast Library, Jamestown, NY. Unlike the Berkshire Museum, the library attempted to maintain its collection, but was unsuccessful. It did not receive as much press as the Berkshire Museum brouhaha. The New York Times ran a story this weekend, too little too late for any with aims to hold on. According to the article, the library had even lined up angel collectors willing to buy the great works to ensure they remained in Jamestown, NY.

Some critics of the sale are particularly upset that the library rejected a plan by two art patrons, Cathy and Jesse Marion of Houston who had proposed keeping the collection in Jamestown by buying about 40 of the works for $1.2 million and finding a new home for them in the city.” 

The New York State Attorney General’s office declined this proposal, instead requiring that the library sell at public auction.

“Mr. Rankin said the library had to pass on that offer because the New York State attorney general’s office, which oversees nonprofit organizations, had objected to a private sale without testing whether the paintings might actually bring in more if sold through public auction.”

The library founders made careful selections amounting to an encyclopedic world tour of artists and contemplative, dreamy scenes to enrich the experience of patrons of all ages. They are fascinating together. I love this beguiling and chatty magpie narrative!

James Prendergast Library Jehan Georges Vibert Le Nouveau commis oil on panel est 30 to 40000
James Prendergast Library collection: Jehan Georges Vibert Le Nouveau commis oil on panel. Sotheby’s Eurpean pre sale estimate is $30,000- $40,000

 

More works to be sold at Sotheby’s to benefit and from the James Prendergast Library collection

 

Continue reading “Berkshire Museum on hold, but James Prendergast Library a go”

BREAKING #GloucesterMA: Passing the legacy– an historic Folly Cove Acorn printing press for the outstanding art department at O’Maley Middle School

Thanks to Mayor Romeo Theken, teacher Brett Dunton, Principal Lucey, and the extreme generosity of Manship Artists Residency & Studios (MARS) under the direction of Rebecca Reynolds, the O’Maley Innovation Middle School ramped up in a powerful fashion with an amazing and enviable addition to the art department:

a rare loan of a Folly Cove Acorn fine art printing press for the art room!

Acorn printing presses were used by Gloucester’s legendary Folly Cove guild of artisans, most notably Virginia Lee Burton, an internationally renowned artist, children’s picture book author-illustrator, dancer, teacher and Folly Cove co-founder. O’Maley students study Gloucester, printmaking, and the history of Folly Cove artists through a myriad of units in each grade and subject, often in partnership with Cape Ann Museum, local artists and other community partners. And now, to have this pedigree press, … Wow! Enjoy some photographs from Brett Dunton from the exciting installation day.

 

teachers Brett Dunton and Ashley Doke with 8th grade students admiring the newly installed famous Acorn press O’Maley Innovation Middle School, Gloucester MA

teachers Brett Dunton and Ashley Doke with 8th grade students admiring the newly installed famous Acorn press O'Maley Innovation Middle School, Gloucester MA

The O’Maley press is one of the last actual Folly Cove presses remaining on Cape Ann. It was owned and used by Elizabeth (Libby) Holoran and Isabel Natti, eventually taking up Holloran’s floor space in the Sarah Elizabeth Store which she opened in 1974. Superstar sculptor, Paul Manship, was Isabel Natti’s grandfather. Aino Natti, Natti’s uncle, was one of the Folly Cove co-founders and the original owner of this particular press. Acorn printing presses were fabricated and distributed by companies like the Adams Brothers in Boston circa 1830-1870. The name “Acorn” comes from the cut away which resembles the shape of an acorn; the presses are RARE and beautiful. One is on view at the Cape Ann Museum.

Mayor Romeo Theken was hopeful that MARS would consider the schools and Gloucester’s students when determing a most suitable location. Teacher Brett Dunton knows Natti and all about this famed press. He was thrilled to build a print room around it and get going. Natti had already given him some of her drying racks. This opportunity would not have happened without MARS working with donors to rescue the press and Mr. Dunton’s expertise and enthusiasm for taking it on. This has to be one of the nicest feel good full circle art stories coming home ever! I look forward to sharing some of the results from the inaugural student printmaking classes, original print editions from this stellar art room addition.

 

 

Sotheby’s auction tanked as Berkshire Museum art yanked & Paul Manship sculpture soared past estimate

The November 13, 2017 evening art sales –counting buyers’ premiums–totaled nearly $500,000,000  between two major NYC auction houses: Sotheby’s American Art sales were $19,407,375 and Christies Impressionism and Modern Art sales were $479,000,000 million.

The Sotheby’s sale was unusual because 7 of its 84 star lots were withdrawn just before the auction, a result of the Berkshire Museum litigation. (The combined conservative value of potential sales for the museum lots was $30,000,000 at the low presale estimate range. If the art is sold in the future its value will be more because of the increased familiarity.) Other Sotheby’s lots went unsold. Two Norman Rockwell works surpassed their estimates.  Of note for Gloucester artists fans, Paul Manship’s sculpture heavily surpassed its estimate. One Milton Avery sold within its estimate range while a second went unsold. There was a selection of original and rare Paul Manship sculpture for sale in Gloucester this summer (here’s the link).

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detail of Paul Manship (1885-1966)  Diana, 1921, which sold for $975,000 at Sotheby’s on November 13, 2017  (hammer Price with Buyer’s Premium) Sotheby’s presale estimate was $400,000-$600,000

Christies sale night had several surprises including records for Leger ($71,000,000)

Christies Leger record breaker Fernand Léger (1881-1955), Contraste de formes, 1913. 36⅜ x 28⅞ in (92.4 x 73.2 cm). Sold for $70,062,500 in the Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sa

and a gorgeous Vuillard,

Vuillard

and big bidding for Van Gogh ($81,000,000 million).

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Laboureur dans un champ, painted in Saint Rémy, early September 1889. 19⅞ x 25½ in (50.3 x 64.9 cm). Sold for $81,312,500 in the Impressionist & Modern

Christies superstar Fall lot is still to come and in all the news: Salvator Mundi –attributed to Leonardo da Vinci– will be sold in the contemporary sale alongside Warhol tomorrow. It’s been for sale since it was rediscovered in the oughts, but no museum purchased it and experts debate its hand and condition. The opening bid for the “lost Leonardo” will be $100,000,000. A Jean Michel Basquit sold for $110,500,000 last May. Christie’s marketing hype video “The Last da Vinci…”

 

 

Will Pittsfield museum be the pits? Last ditch attempts to keep the art in MA

Will Pittsfield’s Berskshire Museum earn a derisive eponymous nickname?
The Berkshire Museum wants to sell its core collection, 40 works including two Norman Rockwells, a lovely John LaFarge Magnolia, a Vuillard, Calder’s first public commissions, and other high lights* for an expansion and redirection. The deaccession has been denounced in art news headlines for the past year, and defended by its museum board. Various alternatives have been batted about including merging with Williams College or moving the art to other MA institutions. Two of the works to be sold were given by the artist, Norman Rockwell. Three sons of the artist are suing to keep the art at the museum. The barbershop depicted in Rockwell’s April 29, 1950 Saturday Evening Post cover was located in East Arlington, Vermont. The Rockwells moved from VT to Stockbridge in 1953. If it’s sold and leaves MA completely, I hope it ends up in a museum near East Arlington, VT.
The auction sale dates are closing in. Crowdfunding for legal costs ramped up, but only recently. Visit the trending gofundme campaign Save the Art Save the Museum https://www.gofundme.com/savetheartsavethemuseum
The Rose Art Museum and Detroit art sales were thwarted. However, full court PR campaigns weren’t launched for an auction sale, which is now the case with the Berkshire Museum upcoming sales at Sotheby’s.
shuffleton-s-barbershop-1950

PITTSFIELD — Three sons of artist Norman Rockwell went to court Friday to stop the auction of 40 works owned by the Berkshire Museum, including two donated by their father. Their action represents the clearest challenge to date of the museum’s plan, announced in July, to sell art to improve its balance sheet and to renovate its South Street facility. – By Larry Parnass

map of Massachusetts museums-

Museums in Massachusetts in google maps by Catherine Ryan.jpg

In addition to the Berkshire Museum pieces, the upcoming Sotheby’s sale on the 13th includes artists with connections to Gloucester such as Anna Hyatt Huntington, Paul Manship and Milton Avery:

Continue reading “Will Pittsfield museum be the pits? Last ditch attempts to keep the art in MA”

PAUL MANSHIP #GloucesterMA historic artist home and studio milestone! STARFIELD property purchased and in the news

Read Gail McCarthy article “Local group buys, plans art residency for sculptors’ estate” from the Gloucester Daily Times.

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American artist Paul Manship (1885–1966) was internationally renowned since the 1920s. He maintained multiple homes and studios: two in the Unites States (New York and Gloucester, MA); Paris; London; and three in Italy. This very special purchase–the only one in the world of a Manship property– Starfield, in the Lanesville section of Gloucester, MA, was made possible by the incredible generosity of the Manship heirs, YOU- Gloucester and MA residents (City of Gloucester & the Commonwealth of MA monies were allocated to this initiative), foundations, businesses and private donations. Congratulations to Rebecca Reynolds and all involved. Early supporters included: the City of Gloucester; Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Fund (MassDevelopment in collaboration with the Massachusetts Cultural Council); the Boston Foundation; Essex County Community Foundation; McDonagh Family Foundation; Stella and Charles Guttman Foundation; National Trust for Historic Preservation; Massachusetts Cultural Council; New England Biolabs Foundation; and Essex National Heritage.

Read more about the funding here

Now that the property is purchased, there will be ongoing fundraising to maintain the property and its mission.

If ever there was a forever endowment match sought, this prestigious Manship opportunity would be one to grab!

Follow this link to see rare, original art by Paul Manship, John Manship and Margaret Cassidy that was recently made available FOR SALE to help raise money for this endeavor. Join to support the cause by donating on line through the website, Manship Artists Residency and Studios (MARS). Eventually the historic property will be open to the public and community, and will support working artists.

lanesville

There are more than 15,000 historic house museums across the county, and just a few that were artists’ home and studios. One of the most influential is the Pollock-Krasner house in East Hampton, Long Island, established in 1988.  A welcome recent addition is the Winslow Homer property in Portland, ME. Here’s hoping the Manship estate is a member on this Historic Artists’ Homes & Studios (HAHS) map soon. Currently, the Massachusetts sites include Daniel Chester French’s Chesterwood in Stockbridge, and the Frelinghuysen Morris home in Lenox.

Historic Artists' homes & studios GOOGLE map

 

 

closing soon: art exhibition includes rare Paul Manship sculptures you could own

This intimate and museum worthy exhibition, THE MANSHIPS, is a rare chance to see and purchase original work by a talented family of artists: Paul Manship, Margaret Cassidy (daughter in law), and John Paul Manship (son). The show closes August 6th. Flatrocks Gallery is located at 77 Langsford Street, in Gloucester, Massachusetts. 

Paul Manship

(b. 1885 St Paul, MN –  d. 1966 NY, NY)

Paul Manship was an American sculptor of international status. His most famous work of art was the public art fountain he was commissioned to create for Rockefeller Center in New York City.  The 18 feet high, gilt bronze statue of the treasured Greek myth, Prometheus Bringing Fire From Heaven, soars above the skating rink. It was installed in 1934 during the Great Depression and includes an inscription above the statue: “Prometheus, teacher in every art, brought the fire that hath proved to mortals a means to mighty ends.” (The artist’s model for Prometheus was a lifeguard from New Rochelle, NY, hired regularly for life classes at women’s colleges. I have not been able to track down a picture of him at work, but have tried.) Prometheus refers to the Titan granted the power of creating mankind out of mud and water. What was missing? Fire, of course, which Prometheus stole from the Gods, a selfless act for humanity that nearly had him punished for eternity (in a memorably sad, gruesome and groundhog day bit of the myth) if not for Hercules. In Manship’s ingenious composition, heaven and earth are filled with Prometheus, clutching fire coals, and the artist’s signature forms and themes in every detail. Note the forms of the water spray in this photo from 1934 and the effect of the water over the base!

1934

 

photo caption: 1943 Christmas Tree, Skaters, Paul Manship Prometheus, Rockefeller Center 

skaters and christmas tree 1943 Gottscho Schleisner

 

photo caption: Gordon Parks, 1945 with detail showing back and hair of Paul Manship Prometheus

gordon parks 1945a

 

photo caption: Carol Highsmith Rockefeller Center (Paul Manship Prometheus) ca.1980 

Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division date unknown (1980 to 2010)

Why am I going into such detail about the Prometheus statue?

Paul Manship lifetime bronzes from the family estate have been made available for sale during this exhibition!

This exhibit at Flatrocks includes a complete set of Manship’s famous tondo Zodiac medallion ashtrays, ca.1946  ($18,000). Manship was a cigar smoker. Ashtrays weren’t a big creative leap from medallic art. He created his first one in 1915. They were utilitarian, and sculptural objects. He did this with architectural details in his home, a Manship (rather than Midas) touch. He worked out a deal with Medallic Art Company to replicate them. People bough their favorite zodiac sign for themselves or as gifts. Even if you don’t know Manship’s motifs like the zodiac ring around Prometheus, it’s fun to linger and observe the entire set.

photo caption: Installation view of display case, an exhibition within an exhibition.

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Compare the Paul Manship Aquarius from the Zodiac set with a zoomed in detail from Prometheus

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detail zodiac ring

 

A first edition of Manship’s creative and original representation of Venus Anadyomene “Venus Rising from the Sea” is also available for sale! It’s modeled in bronze and set on a marble base, measuring 7.5″ (not including base) and dates from 1924 ($42,000).

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Artists and patrons through the ages couldn’t resist this Aphrodite lure. Manship’s sculpture isn’t as famous as Botticelli’s, but it should be — and not just because his kneeling modern beauty has the best wrought hair wringing out there. It’s just a fabulous sculpture.

The main commission for the new Addison Gallery building at Phillips Academy  which opened in 1931 was this Manship sculpture.  Unforgettable and rendered in gorgeous alabaster, the Addison Gallery’s Venus Anadyomene from 1927 is one of the world’s most optimally sited sculptures. The whole museum flows from this Venus. Now you can purchase the sculpture that inspired Addison’s architect, Charles Platt, to make such a brilliant selection. Platt also designed the Freer Gallery in Washington, DC, which is equally sublime.

Another life cast that’s for sale is this vividly detailed and lovely Perseus and Andromeda, 1965 ($39,000).  There’s a rescue and great tension so effective with the mixed materials, florid and fascinating. There’s poor Andromeda sacrificed by her mother Cassiopeia to appease Poseidon and beg off a sea monster. You can pick out the anger and emotion in that sea. The bag with Medusa’s severed head was captivating, bounced just so, side quests are still to come after all. Don’t miss the sword and winged sandals Hermes gave Perseus.

I’m fascinated by Manship’s treatment of time. Speaking of which, make sure to leave enough of it to study those glorious Manship reaching hands and gestures.

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Another knock one’s socks off lifetime bronze that’s for sale is David, ca.1916-1921 ($72,000), mesmerizing composition and signature elegant articulation.

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Manship came to Gloucester in 1915–before his first solo exhibition– and rented until the 1940s when they were able to purchase fourteen contiguous acres in Lanesville, ensuring the acquisition of two, gorgeous abandoned quarries. His daughter Pauline and her husband Ilmari Natti also bought a home in Lanesville in the 1940s. After Manship died, his son John Manship and daughter in law Margaret Cassidy continued to reside and work in the family estate. The Flatrocks Gallery location, vibe, and roster make it an ideal gallery for this exhibit and fundraiser. Proceeds will help the nationally significant Manship estate and property.

 

John Paul Manship (1927-2000)

Make sure to look back at John Manship’s work from the next room as well as up close. There are strong works from different series and decades primarily of the landscape and people about him, and so many greens! They range in price from $750-$10,000.

 

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Margaret Cassidy Manship

(Cassidy died in 2012)

I was so intrigued by the 3 Cassidy works.  The painting and bronze of Beryl Grimball are sold as a pair ($5000) and the portrait from life of Pope Pius XII is $7000. She also sculpted Pope John Paul II and Presidents Carter and Reagan. I hope to see more.

 

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Continue reading “closing soon: art exhibition includes rare Paul Manship sculptures you could own”

Gloucester portion of Massachusetts 2017 $9,000,000 arts funding celebrates Paul Manship and…

SAAM-J0038934
Sculpture Garden outside Paul Manship residence/studio Lanesville village of Gloucester, MA  (photo taken after 1943 when he bought 14 acres abandoned quarry)

How did Gloucester stack up? $375,500

From the release (May 18, 2017 – New Bedford, MA) – 

“The Baker-Polito Administration and Massachusetts Cultural Council today announced $9.3 million in new awards from Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Fund (CFF), celebrating over $100 million in total cultural sector investments since the fund was established ten years ago. An additional $10 million in funding was included in the Baker-Polito Administration’s Fiscal Year 2018 Capital Budget Plan released last week…Over $100 million in CFF awards since 2007 have supported 772 building projects in the nonprofit arts, sciences and humanities, with total development costs of $2.6 billion, driving cultural tourism, job growth, and community vitality in cities and towns across Massachusetts. Over ten years CFF-funded projects have supported 8,512 full time jobs and $492 million in wages, employed 23,778 architects, engineers, contractors, and construction workers, and created 2,092 new permanent jobs…The new round of awards today includes 61 capital grants totaling about $8.9 million and another 18 planning grants totaling nearly $400,000. Grants range from $7,000 to $300,000, and must be matched one-to-one from private and/or other public sources. Learn more about the CFF.”

Scroll on to see the state’s Cultural Facilities Funding (CFF) totaling $367,000 plus Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) totaling $8500 breakdown for Gloucester.  Along with the categories below and others, make sure and think about next year’s application categories including the new festival grant category OPEN NOW.

MCC ARTIST FELLOWSHIP -$0

MCC BIG YELLOW SCHOOL BUS  – $400

O’Maley and Veterans $200 each for an educational field trip

CULTURAL FACILITIES FUND (CFF) – $367,000

Driven by the Boston Foundation, MA Advocates for the Arts, Sciences and Humanities (MAASH), the MCC and others after many years, this big pot that funds so many projects was part of legislation passed back in July of 2006. Complete list of the winners announced May 18, 2017. Gloucester received 3 awards:

UU is MA cultural facilities fundGloucester Meetinghouse Foundation, Gloucester
Project: Fire Safety and Detection Systems
Grant:
$130,000

About the Facility: The Federal Style edifice, completed in 1806, is the largest, oldest and last remaining historic Meetinghouse in Gloucester. It serves as a welcoming civic center, distinguished concert hall and hub for community events. About this Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation $130,000 for the installation of a comprehensive fire-sprinkler system, fire-proof insulation and new detection systems.

SAAM-J0085221SAAM-J0085220 (1)Manship Artist and Residence Studios (MARS)Gloucester
Project: Acquisition and Establishment of New Artist Residency
Grant: $207,000
About the Facility: Manship Artist and Residence Studios will preserve a local treasure with national significance and continue the legacy of Cape Ann’s historic community of artists by establishing an artist residency program at the renovated 15+ acre property of sculptor Paul Manship. About the Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded Manship Artist and Residence Studios $207,000 to purchase the Manship property in Gloucester, which will be transformed into an artist educational facility and gallery place. In 2016, MARS received $30,000 to conduct a feasibility study for the renovation of the Manship property as an arts and culture center with an artist residency program.

Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester
Grant: $30,000 Feasibility & Technical Assistance Grants
About this Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded the Cape Ann Museum $30,000 for architectural studies and strategic planning assistance to explore expansion and facility improvements, informed by programmatic need and a 2016 Systems Replacement Plan.

MCC CULTURAL INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO- $0

MCC JOHN AND ABIGAIL ADAMS ART PROGRAM – $0

FESTIVALS PROGRAM– $500

St Peter’s Fiesta

–NEW GRANT OPEN–Festivals Taking Place September 1, 2017 – February 28, 2018
Online application available: June 2017
Preliminary funding decisions begin: September 1, 2017
Application deadline: September 15, 2017 at 5 PM (ET)
Grants announced: October 2017

MCC LOCAL CULTURAL COUNCIL (LCC)-  $7600

Allocation Gloucester $7,600 Thanks LCC volunteers on the committee for processing the applications every year

Alicia Quintano, Lucille LePage and

2017 / 2016

$911 / $450

Cape Ann Shakespeare Troupe $295 / $348
Cape Ann Symphony $200
Community Band, Cape Ann $500
DiPrima, Jay $300 / $250
East Gloucester Elementary School PTO $500 / $300
Ethnic Arts Center $400 / $400
Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library $500 (1 grant) / $964 (2 grants)
Gloucester Writers Center $300
Mark Chester Diversity Project and MIRA Coalition, a 501(c)3 $300
Mass Audubon Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary $200
Northeast MA Youth Orchestras, Inc. $500
Rockport Music $250 / $400
Sarah Slifer Swift $400 / $400
Sheehan, Rose $960 / $500
Sheehan, Rose $800 / $450
Sheehan, Rose $800
Summer Concert Series, Antonio Gentile Bandstand $500
Wendy Manninen, Vicki Marsh & $400 / $300
Windhover Foundation $500 / $700

LAST YEAR’S GMG POST: 2016 THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE! NEARLY $310,000 GLOUCESTER PIECE OF MA’S ART FUNDING PIE *some of the grants announced in 2016 span more than one year (if they were listed last year I did not repeat them into this year)

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Paul Manship Gloucester property

GMG Post- Gloucester at the MET Paul Manship Three Bears, Anna Hyatt Huntington…

FEEDING THE TORTOISE AT CAPE ANN MUSEUM

Don’t you love the fabulous and recently gifted Paul Manship “Tortoise” ❤

paul-manship-tortoise-cape-ann-museum-4copyright-kim-smithErik Ronnberg and “Tortoise.” Erik is the adjunct maritime curator for the Museum and model ship builder.paul-manship-tortoise-cape-ann-museum-3-copyright-kim-smith

paul-manship-tortoise-cape-ann-museum-1-copyright-kim-smithWard One City Councilor Scott Memhard and Erik Ronnberg at the Movalli opening

The bronze “Tortoise” was modeled in 1916 and cast in 1999. The gift was made possible through the generous donations of Arthur N. Ryan, Henrietta Gates, Heaton Robertson, and attendees of the 2015 Women’s Luncheon. Read more about Paul Manship’s work at the Cape Ann Museum here.

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Perhaps Manship’s most well known work, it’s interesting to see how the plaza surrounding “Prometheus” has changed through the decades.

prometheus-fountain-plaza-rockefeller-center-new-york-citywalk-in-new-york-new-york-vintage-rockefeller-center-city-garden-club-and-fountain-axis-from-above-1934Prometheus at Rockefeller Center by Paul Manship

Photos from today’s 9th Annual Women’s Luncheon at Cape Ann Museum

The Cape Ann Museum was closed today and early yesterday to prepare for their incredible luncheon. This year it was throughout the museum with formal seating upstairs and downstairs and a rock star video feed. It was elegant, inspiring and fun! For more information see the earlier GMG post. 

Mariposa founder Livia Cowan with Mariposa designers, Shelly Bradbury and Michael Updike, were the featured speakers. Timothy S. Hopkins catered; it was scrumptious. Tiny special red peppers looked like ornaments in our salads and were a discovery for many. The new tote bag featuring the Lee Natti chicadee print was flying out the museum shop. Kathleen Adams (harpsichord) and Dawn Pratson (flute) filled our hearts with LIVE music directly from the Jeremy Adams exquisite special exhibition. The Paul Manship tortoise was festooned for the holidays which seemed extra fitting as last year’s luncheon raised more than $25,000 towards this acquisition.

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Art of fatherhood: Gloucester artists and writers

A small selection of images and words about and by fathers, with Gloucester ties. What would you add? Happy Father’s Day!

Edward Hopper portrait of artist's father
Edward Hopper, portrait of artist’s father, Whitney Museum

 

Air

They took my father’s father from the mines

and laid him, broken, on the kitchen table,

the wake singers lifting their lines

above the water heater he had often mended.

 

My father always dreamed of him alive,

able to whittle an oak peg for every split thing.

all my father lost at the age of nine

enclosed his life, his air.

 

In my flood dream, I carry my father

piggyback–easier than a kid’s coffin–

to safety from the Susquehanna River

as light as a dollhouse, now, or violin.

Joseph Featherstone, from his book of poems, Brace’s Cove

 

Gloucester, Massachusetts. Anthony Parisi, an Italian fisherman's son
Gordon Parks, “Gloucester, Massachusetts. Anthony Parisi, an Italian fisherman’s son.” Library of Congress, FSA collection

 

Caitlin

To be seven when a brother dies–

to have shared a room.

Her silence frightened us.

 

One night she rose from the table

and climbed to the top of the stairs.

We heard the small voice

 

singing each of the songs

from the funeral service.

The next morning in school

 

she announced to her class,

“I am ready for questions now.”

by Joseph Featherstone, from Brace’s Cove

 

Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father's home, part of the tri-annual fiesta of Pentacost. The celebration--including the chosing of an Imperator, and
Gordon Parks, “Gloucester, MA. Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father’s home…” Library of Congress

full title for the Gordon Parks photograph above: “Frank Domingos kissing a vessel representing remains of a saint, during ceremonies at his father’s home, part of the tri-annual fiesta of Pentacost. The celebration–including the chosing of an Imperator, and visiting, eating, drinking, and worship in the home, culminates in a parade and blessing by the priest–originated with ancient Portugeese fisherman, drought-stricken, who prayed for assistance and received it.”

 

John_hays_hammond_and_natalie_hays_hammond library of congress
John Hays Hammond with daughter, Natalie Hays Hammond. collection Library of Congress

Captain’s Courageous was published in 1897. “During the winter of 1897-98 I made another trip to South Africa, and on the same boat with me were Rudyard Kipling (Rudyard was named after a place where his father and mother first met), his wife, and his father, Lockwood Kipling, the artist. They proved excellent traveling companions and we have maintained our friendly contact ever sense.” – John Hays Hammond 

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John Lockwood Kipling and Rudyard Kipling

The Kiplings collaborated: the artist John Lockwood Kipling illustrated many of his sons’ books.

John Lockwood Kipling Jungle Book

jungle book 2

John Lockwood Kipling White Seal
John Lockwood Kipling, The White Seal

 

William Foster Biddle Cecilia Beaux PAFA gift of Sandwith Drinker
Cecilia Beaux, portrait sketch of William Foster Biddle, Pennsylvania Academy Fine Art, gift of Sandwith Drinker  (Biddle like a father to Cecilia)

 

William Morris Hunt Prodigal Son Brattleboro library
William Morris Hunt, Prodigal Son, Brattleboro Library

Hunt purchased a former barn and adjoining carpenter’s shop in Magnolia. “…in three weeks the old, unsightly buildings were converted into a picturesque structure with galleries on the outside, one of them ending in a seat in an old willow-tree. The carpenter shop was turned into a studio, the chief light coming from the wide-open door…The barn was two stories in height, the lower portion being occupied by the van, a phaeton and a dog-cart, as well as by stalls for two or three horses. The upper room was known as the “barracks”, and half a dozen cot-beds were arranged around the sides, as seats by day and beds by night…In a single afternoon his celebrated Gloucester Harbor was painted, and he returned to Magnolia aglow with enthusiasm. “I believe,” he exclaimed, “that I have painted a picture with light in it!…Go out into the sunshine, and try to get some of its color and light. Then come back here, and see how black we are all painting!”

William Morris Hunt Gloucester Harbor MFA 1877
William Morris Hunt, Gloucester Harbor, 1877, MFA Boston

 

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John Singer Sargent portrait of the artist’s father, Sargent House Museum

 

Paul Manship and family Isabel Manship xSarah Janet x Elizabeth x Pauline x John Paul x Paul
Family portrait: Isabel Manship, Sara Janet, Elizabeth, Pauline, John Paul, Paul Manship

 

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Lee Kingman, Peter’s Pony, 1963, with illustrations by Fen Lasell

 

Leon Doucette
Leon Doucette, portrait of the artist’s father

 

Milton Avery March drypoint 1933
Milton Avery 1933 drypoint (March, his daughter)

 

Winslow Homer captures the waiting and watching experienced by so many families in Gloucester. Homer’s father, Charles Savage Homer, left for extended start-ups: to California for gold, to Europe.  Winslow Homer’s mother was a professional and gifted artist who raised three stellar boys solo, a lot. The Homer family remained tight knit.

Dad's Coming, 1873, NGA
Winslow Homer, Dad’s Coming, 1873,  National Gallery of Art

 

Friday Nights at the A&P

By Ruthanne “Rufus”  Collinson

When I was a kid

there were Friday nights to get lost in.

There was Mama

to take me shopping,

the smell of outdoors on her wool coat.

There was the A&P on Main Street,

the long spread out time

to wander the rolling floors

and smell the oranges and the coffee grinding.

There was no talking with Mama and me

She chose the food and I thought,

the long time of thinking away from Mama

in the A&P.

I watched the women

with heavy faces and deep frowns

weighing out their fruits

I thought about how bad they looked,

but I knew they didn’t want to die

because of the way they cared

about stacking the apples.

Sometimes I lost Mama and her sadness

but she would find me and take me

to the check out

where I picked up Daddy’s Pall Malls

and then stayed close to her wide sleeve

as we carried our lumpy brown bags

past Paul T. Reddy’s Dancing School.

I heard people dancing upstairs

Shadows in the window suggested music

and the end of time laid out like that.

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