BEAUTIFUL DOE AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH

Well hello there beautiful doe of the dunes.

This graceful, slender beauty leisurely strolled, and then pranced, up to me while I was filming PiPls. I stood very still as she came closer and closer, trying not to move a muscle. With great curiosity, she spent a few minutes looking at me. The doe came so close, I could have reached out my hand and touched her.

After the once over from her, and a magical moment for me, she then proceeded to walk a few feet away and take a very long pee in a tide pool. I was filming, not photographing at this point, and so it was captured on film. I don’t know why I think this was funny, I guess because while I was thinking, this is so beautiful, perhaps she was wondering if I was a tree and a suitable place to go pee.

Dancing along with the waves at the shoreline, she was heading back to the dunes when a photographer boxed her into a corner, forcing her to cross the creek and go up the rocky incline to Sherman’s Point, and then cross the road. I prayed she would not get hit by a car (FYI, the photographer had a huge telephoto lens!)

Half an hour later I was further down the beach and happily surprised as the doe came in from the road. She had circled all the way around, her tongue was hanging out and she was out of breath. After a few sips of water at the creek, the elegant White-tailed doe of the dunes crossed the marsh and made her way back home.

Beautiful sunrise yesterday morning, too.

Doe Tracks – I have been making a photographic record of all the different types of animal prints that we see at Good Harbor Beach in the morning. Usually, the deer tracks are in the softer sand and not as clearly defined.

WHEN A DEER COMES PRANCING ALONG THE BEACH!

Well hello there beautiful doe of the dunes.

This graceful, slender beauty leisurely strolled, and then pranced, up to me while I was filming PiPls. I stood very still as she came closer and closer, trying not to move a muscle. With great curiosity, she spent a few minutes looking at me. The doe came so close, I could have reached out my hand and touched her.

After the once over from her, and a magical moment for me, she then proceeded to walk a few feet away and take a very long pee in a tide pool. I was filming, not photographing at this point, and so it was captured on film. I don’t know why I think this was funny, I guess because while I was thinking, this is so beautiful, perhaps she was wondering if I was a tree and a suitable place to go pee.

Dancing along with the waves at the shoreline, she was heading back to the the dunes when a photographer boxed her into a corner, forcing her to cross the creek and go up the rocky incline to Sherman’s Point, and then cross the road. I prayed she would not get hit by a car (FYI, the photographer had a huge telephoto lens!)

Half an hour later I was further down the beach and happily surprised as the doe came in from the road. She had circled all the way around, her tongue was hanging out and she was out of breath. After a few sips of water at the creek, the elegant White-tailed doe of the dunes crossed the marsh and made her way back home.

Beautiful sunrise yesterday morning, too.

Doe Tracks – I have been making a photographic record of all the different types of animal prints that we see at Good Harbor Beach in the morning. Usually, the deer tracks are in the softer sand and not as clearly defined.

WHITE-TAILED DEER: A COAT OF MANY FUNCTIONS

You never know what beautiful creatures you may be fortunate enough to encounter when chasing winged friends.

White-tailed Deer grow a second thicker coat of fur for protection against the cold during fall, and shed that second coat during spring.The reddish color will give way to grayish brown hairs at the onset of colder weather, providing better camouflage as well. Deer can increase the insulative value of their fur by puffing out their hair. These are probably nursing does because they keep their reddish color longer than bucks and does that have weaned their fawns.

FAWN AND MAMA DEER AT EASTERN POINT

Longtime Eastern Point resident Elli shares this lovely scene of a doe and fawn foraging in her backyard. I have seen lots of bucks in the marsh at the EP Lighthouse and we’ve had a few single deer in our yard on Plum Street, but never a fawn and doe. I sure would love to photograph/film a fawn and mom on Cape Ann. Thanks so much to Elli for sharing!White-tailed doe and fawn, Eastern Point, Gloucester

CAR-TRUCK-TWO DEER ACCIDENT 128 NORTH

Car, Truck, and Two Deer Accident

Fortunately both drivers of the two vehicles are uninjured and fine, if not a little shook up. Two White-tailed Deer were struck as they ran across Rt. 128, coming from the Lobsta Land marsh, heading toward the river. Judging from a quick glance, both deer appeared young. The Verizon truck driver and car driver did not sustain injuries, although there is extensive damage to their vehicles. So sorry this happened to them, but very glad they are a-okay.