Mass Cultural Council ‏ thrilled to congratulate the Boston String Academy winner of the 2019 Commonwealth Awards!

Winners are Boston String Academy, Mass Audubon, The Care Center in Holyoke, and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum

Learn More! Boston String Academy

And this was a rehearsal!

 

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read more about all the thirteen 2019 MCC Commonwealth Award nominated finalists here

“Presented every two years, the Commonwealth Awards shine a spotlight on the extraordinary contributions the arts, humanities, and sciences make to education, economic growth and vitality, and quality of life in communities across Massachusetts. The Commonwealth Awards ceremony also presents an opportunity for the Massachusetts nonprofit cultural sector to gather, assert its value, and make the case for public investment in its work.

Past winners include leading artists, writers, and scholars such as Olympia Dukakis and David McCullough; world-renowned institutions like Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival and the Peabody Essex Museum; and social innovators like the Cambridge Science Festival and the Barr Foundation.”

The city of Gloucester received a Commonwealth Award in 2015.

 

BERKSHIRE EAGLE receives 2019 JFK Commonwealth Award

Berkshire Eagle just received the JFK Commonwealth Award. Berkshire Eagle 2019 arts coverage included the outstanding work by Larry Parnass on the Berkshire Museum deaccession story. Well done!

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Stay tuned for the MCC announcement of the winner of the 13 finalists.

 

 

Gloucester Manship Artists Residency + Studios nominated for a Commonwealth Award

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The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) announced 13 finalists vying for the Massachusetts 2019 Commonwealth Awards including Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester, Mass!

press release from MARS:

The Manship Artists Residency + Studios aka MARS is a finalist for the 2019 Commonwealth Awards. Announcing the thirteen 2019 finalists, Mass Cultural Council Executive Director Anita Walker said “​The Commonwealth Award is the highest honor in the arts and culture in Massachusetts. It is a celebration of the best of the best and a demonstration of the Power of Culture to enrich us all. This extraordinary group of awardees exemplifies our state’s unique cultural fabric. Their collective and individual achievements have made us a better Commonwealth.”
​ The Manship Artists Residency + Studios is recognized as an exemplary grassroots effort that brought together the skills, talents, and resources to save a local treasure with national importance as an innovative cultural resource for today and for future generations.

Established as a national and international, interdisciplinary artists residency and cultural hub, MARS has been developing partnerships and alliances with local, regional and international organizations in order to enrich and enhance existing public offerings, as well as to introduce new and exciting creative opportunities. For example, the first cohort of artists that worked at the Manship site were selected by a curator of the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy in Andover and were included in an exhibition there on sculptor Paul Manship’s legacy this past fall and winter. ​Local artists also will benefit in many ways – indeed, the first “visiting” artist in January 2017 was Gloucester resident Diane KW. And, among the first “resident’ artists who will begin to stay at the Manship home as soon as renovations are completed on the residence this Spring is Lara Lepionka, a Gloucester artist and social justice activist, who has achieved wide acclaim for her award-winning nonprofit, Backyard Growers.

In addition to visiting and resident artists, MARS welcomes other innovators and cultural leaders. Thus far MARS has hosted a Smithsonian museum conservator, a Metropolitan Museum curator, an independent Maine filmmaker, as well as a dance troupe from New York City. In July 2018, MARS’ hosted its first public event: Quarry Dance VII, a collaboration with Windhover Performing Arts Center attracted over 1000 guests to four free public showings of the site-specific performance. MARS will offer similar signature public events each summer, including exhibitions, installations and performances. The first exhibition at MARS will open the house to the public with artwork by Willie “Loco” Alexander. While Willie is known internationally as a musical pioneer, few have had the pleasure of experiencing his paintings and collages first-hand. MARS is also engaged in educational outreach. Thanks to a generous donor, MARS purchased an original Folly Cove Designer Acorn Press and has loaned this cultural treasure to the O’Maley Innovation Middle School for the use of local students and artists. This loan compliments the Folly Cove Designer (FCD) curriculum that was established in the schools by the Cape Ann Museum several years ago.
MARS Advisor Catherine Amidon commented that “​It is always exciting and inspiring when a young organization such as MARS receives recognition for their achievement along with a prominent list of seasoned and accomplished cultural colleagues. MARS’ success is a tribute to the support and guidance of the Mass Cultural Council, and to the generosity of local artists and collaborators, of donors who have invested wisely and who wanted to support the hard work of MARS’ board members, their advisors, and the incredible volunteers who have brought MARS this far in such a short time. Were it not for this collective effort, MARS would not be here today.​ ”

● For more information on the MCC Commonwealth Awards contact ​Carmen Plazas​, Communications Manager, 617-858-2738.

● For the Manship Project, contact Rebecca Reynolds, Founder and Board President, (978) 290-8438. MARS’ web site is ​www.manshipartists.org Follow @manshipartists on facebook, twitter and instagram

GMG Paul Manship historic artist home and studio purchase Sept 2017 

Manships exhibition and fundraiser for MARS

NEA allocates 27 million and the winning arts applicants are…

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) 2019 grant recipients were announced this month. Poetry was competitive.

  • For the NEA 2019 Artworks 972 of 1605 eligible grants were funded (ranging from $10,000-$100,00 totaling more than $25 million)
  • For the NEA 2019 Challenge America 138 of 221 eligible applications to receive $10,000 each for a total of $1.38 million
  • For the NEA 2019 Creative Writing Fellowships in poetry–  35 of 1700 eligible applicants (none having won an NEA fellowship before) to receive $25,000 each. “Visit the Arts Endowment’s Literature Fellowships webpage to read excerpts by and features on past Creative Writing Fellows and recipients of Literature Fellowships for translation projects.”

Comparison by state from N. Dakota 1 grant $30,000 to NYC 252 grants 6.8 million

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NEA 2019 grant awards popped into chart comparison©catherine ryan

 

Here are the details for Massachusetts 40 grants totaling $1,085,000. In 2019 there were three projects awarded on the North Shore: RAW Beverly; Decordova Museum; and PYD in Somerville. Continue reading “NEA allocates 27 million and the winning arts applicants are…”

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, message about the superpower of art & culture

December 2018 looking ahead:

“We are on the front lines of a war on poverty. Not necessarily a shortage of material wealth, although its distribution in America is both a consequence and contributor to the current distress.

The poverty our field confronts every day is that which Robert Kennedy confronted while running for President in 1968. He contrasted the wealth represented in the nation’s gross national product with the wealth necessary to sustain a democracy and make life worth living. 

He said, “…the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

We are currently in one of the best economies in a generation, but studies show record declines in our sense of well-being. Worse yet, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. Major newspapers are sounding the alarm. In the Washington Post, George Will writes that loneliness, a major public health problem, is in “epidemic proportions” and that people are unhappier, more isolated and less fulfilled. David Brooks claims, in the New York Times, the biggest factor is the crisis of connection. We are “in a straight-up social catastrophe,” he writes. 
 
For nearly the last 20 years, those of us who advocate for the arts and culture have made the economy the centerpiece of our argument. We’ve collected economic impact data, counted the jobs we create and the taxes we generate, and touted our centrality to the tourism industry. We became the poster child of the creative economy. In an environment of it’s the economy stupid, these arguments won over state legislators and delivered budget increases to state arts agencies.

Five years ago, I wrote a column for a national arts blog suggesting that it was time to dial back the economic argument, even suggesting that there is something powerful about the intrinsic value of the arts. That the transforming power of culture is the power of creative expression, human engagement, and empathy. 

This is the poverty of our time. When Kennedy spoke of joy, beauty, intelligence, integrity, wit, wisdom, courage, compassion, and devotion he spoke of the ideals that are inherent in art and culture.

The arts and culture are the antidote to what ails us as a nation. In fact, they can both prevent and cure. Studies show that creative and cultural participation enhances human health and well-being leading to: reduced social isolation; opportunities for learning; calming experiences and decreased anxiety; more optimism, hope and enjoyment; increased self-esteem and sense of identity; increased inspiration and “meaning-making;” and better communication.

I can write about the studies and outcomes, but the heart is more articulate:
“It is a remarkable experience to witness a high school student watching a young adult with down’s syndrome or cerebral palsy offer a sonnet, and think to himself, ‘I want to do that. I want to have that kind of courage, that kind of conviction.’ Or to be a man or a woman of any age and watch someone you have typecast in your heart of hearts as somehow less than, stand in the center of a crowd and speak a truth about what it is like to dream of being seen for all of what you offer and know that a wall has just fallen…and through that kind of honest performance, know that you have been changed for the better,” writes Maria Sirois about Community Access to the Arts in Great Barrington, an organization that unleashes the arts in people with disabilities.

Music can help stroke victims regain their speech. You’re never too old to sing, or dance, or paint. Victims of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia find calm and clarity through the arts. Art is a universal language that bridges race, ethnicity, and culture – in a neighborhood, or across continents. The arts help explain the complexity of physics or climate change. Science and art are close cousins, sharing the bloodlines of creativity, risk taking, and problem solving.
 
Massachusetts cultural organizations are committed to serving everybody in the Commonwealth. They joined a new program this year to offer the benefits only the arts and culture can provide to people who have fallen on hard times and are receiving assistance through the state EBT card, a card that provides help to families living near the poverty level. Our organizations agreed to offer free or greatly reduced admission prices to EBT cardholders. In our first year, we tracked 220,000 EBT admissions. 

Nearly a quarter of a million doses of arts and culture to people in need. Again, the heart is in the stories. One concertgoer, who had not been able to attend a concert in years said, “It was nice to have a slice of my old life back.” Another said “It’s hard to describe the feeling of being able to do something ‘normal’ when everything else isn’t.”

The Mass Cultural Council is not an economic development agency, but when we do arts well, tourists visit and spend money, communities become destinations and better places to live, jobs are supported and created, innovators want to live here, and build new businesses.
 
The Mass Cultural Council is not an education agency, but when children have a quality experience participating in the arts, in school, and out of school, they exercise their creative minds, learn to think critically, are better observers and team players, and get a better education.

The Mass Cultural Council is not a human service agency, but when some of our most troubled youth participate in arts programs that give them a productive outlet for their fears and anger, provide a supportive community, build self-esteem and teach skills that will last a lifetime, these young people are saved from gangs, prison, drugs, even death.

In her book “Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum writes:

“Citizens cannot relate well to the complex world around them by factual knowledge and logic alone. The third ability of the citizen, closely related to the first two, is what we can call the narrative imagination. This means the ability to think what it might be like to be in the shoes of a person different from oneself, to be an intelligent reader of that person’s story, and to understand the emotions and wishes and desires that someone so placed might have.”

Martha Nussbaum is a close reader of Aristotle, who defined the good life as one that was authentically meaningfully rich: rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, great accomplishment, and enduring achievement.

George Will writes of the crumbling of America’s social infrastructure and the need for new habits of mind and heart, new practices of neighborliness. David Brooks says, “It’s not jobs, jobs, jobs anymore. It’s relationships, relationships, relationships.” Real relationships, not virtual or transactional ones. True engagement of heart and mind.

The poverty we face is one we can defeat. Novelist Alice Walker once said, “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”
 
Story. Imagination. Empathy. This is our superpower: the power of culture.” – 
Anita Walker , Executive Director, Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) 

Visit the Mass Cultural Council website

Have a podcast listen – Creative Minds Out Loud:  podcast for art and Culture –  Informative and lively conversations with arts and cultural leaders. Creative Minds Out Loud is a project of the Mass Cultural Council, and is hosted by Executive Director Anita Walker. https://creativemindsoutloud.org

 

 

‘Christmas with the Bach Family’ magical Musicians of the Old Post Road with opera soloists coming to Gloucester Meetinghouse UU Church

GLOUCESTER MEETINGHOUSE FOUNDATION presents The Musicians of the Old Post Road ‘Christmas with the Bach Family’ Friday, December 14, 2018, 7:30pm Corner of Middle & Church Street, Gloucester, MA

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Press release from the Gloucester Meetinghouse: Continue reading “‘Christmas with the Bach Family’ magical Musicians of the Old Post Road with opera soloists coming to Gloucester Meetinghouse UU Church”

cultural districts across the state convened at Natick Center for the Arts MCC #powerofculture

Cape Ann participated in the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) statewide cultural district convening which was hosted by the Natick Center for the Arts. Statewide district gatherings occur once or twice a year: the last two were held in Cambridge, and Beverly. Representatives from Gloucester, Rockport and Essex cultural districts were in attendance. (Manchester and Ipswich do not not have a designation at this time. Gloucester could have seven.)

Massachusetts Cultural Council Director, Anita Walker, welcomed the crowd, and introduced officials from Natick and new additions to the MCC staff. Jill Cahill, Gloucester’s Director of Community Development, brought a gift from the Mayor and the City to add to a send-off  of thanks and well wishes for Meri Jenkins, longtime MCC leader who managed cities and towns through cultural facilities funding and district designations. Luis Edgardo Cotto and Justina Crawford will be taking over the MCC Community Initiative programs managed by Meri.

MERI JENKINS helped cities and towns statewide having served Massachusetts Cultural Council nearly 20+ years_©c ryan Oct 2018 MCC cultural district convening Natick MA venue.jpg

 

The MCC approved five year district renewals for both Rocky Neck and Rockport last year. District renewal for Gloucester’s downtown is underway. Essex received official citations for their renewal at this convening. Here’s a photo of Christopher Stepler, artist and Manager of Essex Shipbuilding Museum, and Lee Spence, former Director. One update they shared was that the successful historic exhibition The Women of Essex – Stories to Share displayed at Essex Town Hall in a renovated bright space on the top floor above the TOHP Burnham Public Library (thanks in part to Cultural Facilities funding) was selected to travel to the NPS regional Visitor Center in Salem.

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prior GMG post with MCC October news 

“When you go into the Woods” solo art exhibition by Vanessa Michalak opens Oct. 2nd at Jane Deering Gallery

“When you go into the Woods: Dogtown and other treasures of the forest”, a solo exhibition by Vanessa Michalak, opens October 2, 2018 at Jane Deering Gallery Gloucester, Massachusetts. Reception 6-8pm on October 6th.

VANESSA VICHALAK Fallen Tree oil on yupo mounted on panel_40 x 60_ Jane Deering Gallery solo show October 2018 Gloucester Mass
Vaness Michalak, “Fallen Tree,” oil on yupo mounted on panel, 40”x60”

jdg oct 2018

Read more about the exhibition and the artist from printed matter announcing the show:

“When you go into the Woods,” features oil paintings by Vanessa Michalak highlighting some of Cape Ann’s well known gems. Works depict imagery of a variety of places including Annisquam Village, Lanesville’s Vernon Quarries and Babson’s Dogtown boulders. The exhibition will be on display throughout October at Jane Deering Gallery, Gloucester, MA with and opening reception scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 6th from 6pm-8pm.

The Exhibition, “When You Go Into The Woods” is a reflection of Michalak’s exploration of Cape Ann and her ongoing investigation of the painting process. The works reflect a fascination with a specific place and its hidden treasures. Many of the works are plein air paintings that brought her to the edges of quarries and sent her trekking through Dogtown’s rocky paths. As much as these works pay tribute to a specific place, they also reflect Michalak’s gestural painting style that at times borders on abstraction. Much like her wanderings in the woods, there is a sense that she doesn’t mind getting a little lost in brushwork, layering and mark before finding her destination. 

Vanessa Michalak grew up in Maine before moving to Boston where she lived and worked for over a decade. While living in Boston she visited Cape Ann often and eventually moved to Gloucester last year. She received an MFA in painting from Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in 2013. Residencies include: Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Snowmass Village, CO; Emerging Artist-in-Residence, Penn State, PA;  and Playa, Summer Lake, OR. Michalak’s work was featured in New American Paintings #110 and Fresh Paint Magazine (cover artist 2014). She was selected as a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow in Painting in 2014.spring woods Annisquam 2018.jpg.png Continue reading ““When you go into the Woods” solo art exhibition by Vanessa Michalak opens Oct. 2nd at Jane Deering Gallery”

Reminder – MCC Local Cultural Council grant deadline is October 15th

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Just around the corner! Reminder: this year the Massachusetts Cultural Council Gloucester LCC Application deadline is October 15th, 2018.

Here’s a list of  2017 awarded projects. The Gloucester Cultural Council is one of hundreds of Local Cultural Councils across the Commonwealth. The LCC Program supports community-based projects in the arts, sciences and humanities every year. The state legislature provides an annual appropriation to the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC), a state agency, which then allocates funds to each community. The Gloucester Cultural Council guidelines and online applications are available at http://www.mass-culture.org/Gloucester.

Massachusetts Cultural Council announces new cultural district funding: Gloucester eligible for $10,000

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Announcement from the Massachusetts Cultural Council:

“Some good news to share: As the Mass Cultural Council (MCC) allocation was increased this year we are able to provide financial support to all the designated cultural districts for Fiscal Year 2019. Each district is eligible to receive a grant of up to $5,000 based on the submission of a plan of action and budget outlining the use of funds. The use of funds must be in line with the goals of the cultural district initiative…(such as) fees for professional consultants; hiring staff to manage or coordinate district activities; marketing and promotion of district activities and events; and fees connected to new cultural programs. Grant funds cannot be used for capital improvement projects or non-arts related activities…We are very delighted to be able to offer this small investment to support your work.”

Gloucester is eligible to apply for up to $10,000 because the city features two cultural districts: Rocky Neck and downtown. The application will be LIVE this week, due October, and awarded December.

Mass Cultural Council 2nd annual Traditional Arts Showcase at Shalin Liu, Sept. 8

Mayor Romeo Theken shares Mass Cultural Council’s invitation to upcoming arts showcase in Rockport: The Mass Cultural Council presents Saturday, September 8, 7:30 PM 

MCC event at Rockport Music.org- Crossing Customs: Immigrant Masters of Music & Dance

“The Mass Cultural Council is sponsoring our second annual Traditional Arts Showcase at the Shalin Liu on September 8. We would love for you to join us! Please share this invitation with your networks (via your newsletters, social media, online calendars, etc.) See details below regarding performers and ticket info. $20 general admission”

Event will celebrate music and dance: Gund Kwok Asian Lion and Dragon Dance Troupe; recent immigrants from Nepal will perform music of the Gandharvas; indigenous music of Greece led by Vasilis Kostas; salsa lesson from Eli Lady Pabon; and music from Latin Logic (photo above).

I wonder if Carlos Menenzes (Cape Ann Big Band;Jambalaya horns, O’Maley), Zach Gorrell, Docksiders, and other area artists and musicians know these groups and vice versa?

Continue below to see more information about the upcoming event and videos of the performers from MCC Press release:

Continue reading “Mass Cultural Council 2nd annual Traditional Arts Showcase at Shalin Liu, Sept. 8”

Sound Harbor presents: FREE weekly Tuesday Jams facilitated by Joe Cardoza

Middle through High School students are invited to attend  FREE weekly Tuesday jams at Sound Harbor facilitated by Joe Cardoza. The series is made possible with support of the Massaschusetts Cultural Council. Sound Harbor is located at 11 Pleasant Street, Gloucester Ma (within Brown’s Mall). 6-8PM

Sound Harbor

Mayor Romeo Theken shares reminder for MCC regional meeting in Ipswich

Dow detail view in ipswich color woodblock printFrom the MCC:

“We wanted to remind you that the Essex County Power of Culture Regional Meeting will take place next Wednesday, May 23rd, 6-8pm in Ipswich. Please join us for a conversation on arts and culture initiatives in the County, and take part in developing your Power of Culture message for your communities and region.”

Where?
Collins Meeting Room
Ipswich Public Library
25 North Main Street
Ipswich, MA 01938-2287

REGISTER here 

MCC annual grant programs

THE FISK CONNECTION | A PROGRESSIVE ORGAN CONCERT ON APRIL 14 Gloucester Meetinghouse UU and St. John’s

high res Fisk facade photoGloucester Meetinghouse Foundation shares news about its upcoming special event

“The the first half of the concert is performed on the historic 1893 Hutchings/Fisk organ in the Gloucester Meetinghouse (home of the Unitarian Universalist Church) and the second half is performed on the innovative 1989 C. B. Fisk organ in St. John’s Episcopal Church next door.  Six professional organists, related in various ways to Gloucester, will perform diverse repertoire on these two fine pipe-organs.  The concert will include narration about the work of Charles Fisk, the relationship of the players to the Fisk legacy, and a bit about how the two instruments sound.  A reception will follow the concert.”

Fisk Connection Organ Concert PosterRead the full press release Continue reading “THE FISK CONNECTION | A PROGRESSIVE ORGAN CONCERT ON APRIL 14 Gloucester Meetinghouse UU and St. John’s”

Listen for #GloucesterMA on the radio! Mass Cultural Council’s WCRB, WBUR, WICN and NEPR spots for Cultural Districts start next week 📻🎙️😊

Last year, the Mass Cultural Council purchased series of 10, 20, and 30 second spots on WCRB, WGBH, WBUR, WICN, and NEPR to promote each of the Massachusetts designated Cultural Districts,” Meri Jenkins explained. They’re doing it again for 2018. Beginning next week, you may hear radio commercials wishing Gloucester and its two cultural districts great success in 2018 (Downtown Cultural District and Rocky Neck cultural district). Email Mayor Romeo Theken’s arts hotline: sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov (subject line MCC radio spots) with the day and time you heard “Gloucester”, where you were and what you think.

Some of the radio spots are scheduled during the following shows

  • Two (2) WFCR News spots rotating thru Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace – Monday thru Saturday
  • Two (2) WFCR Run of Station spots rotating thru Classical Music, Jazz and Entertainment programing – Monday thru Saturday
  • TWO (2) WNNZ News Network spots rotating Monday thru Saturday
  • TWO (2) WNNZ News Network BONUS spots rotating Monday thru Sunday

The MCC is also expanding outreach thru increased collaboration with the state’s office of Travel and Tourism. See Massachusetts excellent and popular travel site. 

The Gloucester page has not been edited, yet–it’s just a placeholder. We can edit and businesses can add in. The calendar is an exciting opportunity integrated with the interactive cultural districts map and information. I’m hoping the GMG and chamber calendars can just be synced up.

MCC new landing page on MOTT ma vacation

$750,000 #NEH grant opportunity for Gloucester…so many possible ideas and projects!

Archival documentation of a federal grant awarded to Gloucester and nationally recognized for its innovation at the time: reclaiming the City dump for an atheletic field at the High School. Photographs of the project included a sweeping vista from atop Hovey Street. Innovative public works dump reclaimed as Gloucester High School track WPA Annual Bulletin

overlay-banner2_originalShared projects and working together are a focus for a new 2018 NEH grant opportunity.

Contact Mayor Romeo Theken’s arts & culture hotline sefatia4arts@gloucester-ma.gov  by Febraury 28 to add to a list of potential projects for Gloucester for this NEH Deadline, March 15, or to consider as other funding opportunities arise.

Mayor Romeo Theken shares the 2018 press release from the Commonwealth:

Activities supported by National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant funds include:
 capital expenditures such as the design, purchase, construction, restoration
or renovation of facilities and historic landscapes;
 the purchase of equipment and software;
 the documentation of cultural heritage materials that are lost or imperiled:
 the sustaining of digital scholarly infrastructure;
 the preservation and conservation of collections; and
 the sharing of collections.

The grant below is a new grant from NEH and could be a great opportunity to enhance your local cultural or historical organizations. Please share it far and wide. And let us know if we can provide a letter of support for an application from your community.  Regards, Rick Jakious

Good afternoon, 
The National Endowment for the Humanities has just announced a new grant program to support humanities infrastructures. Cultural institutions, such as libraries, museums, archives, colleges and universities, and historic sites, are eligible to apply for grants of up to $750,000.
 
These challenge grants, which require a match of nonfederal funds, may be used toward capital expenditures such as construction and renovation projects, purchase of equipment and software, sharing of humanities collections between institutions, documentation of lost or imperiled cultural heritage, sustaining digital scholarly infrastructure, and preservation and conservation of humanities collections.
 
The application deadline for the first NEH Infrastructure and Capacity-Building Challenge Grants is March 15, 2018. Interested applicants should direct questions about grant proposals to challenge@neh.govor 202-606-8309. 
 
Please consider sharing this exciting new funding opportunity with cultural institutions in your district.
 
Thank you,Timothy H. Robison
Director of Congressional Affairs
National Endowment for the Humanities
400 7th Street, SW  4th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20506
(202) 606-8273

Innovative and worthy contemporary Gloucester possibilities abound: shared Archives (NSAA, Rocky Neck, Sargent House, City Archives, CAM, Legion, Libraries, Wards historical societies, etc); Digitize City Archives; Digitize Gloucester Daily Times archives; building and historic landscape projects city owned (City Archives, City Hall, Legion, Fitz Henry Lane, Fire Station, Stage Fort, beaches, etc) or in partnership; DPW work; on and on.

Additional grant opportunities, news, and deadlines: Continue reading “$750,000 #NEH grant opportunity for Gloucester…so many possible ideas and projects!”

Massachusetts Cultural Council Power of Connection Tour in #GloucesterMA | Cultural Center @RockyNeckArt

The Cultural Center at Rocky Neck, 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA, was one of the few cultural districts selected as a host venue for the MCC Power of Connection Tour launch. Today’s gathering includes city and state officials: Mayor Romeo Theken, Senator Bruce Tarr & Representative Ann-Margaret Ferrante of Gloucester.

Guests are just arriving for the welcome reception. I will post all we glean from MCC new grants and updates. Gloucester has two districts: Rocky Neck and downtown Harbortown. On the walls at Rocky Neck center–the holiday group show is installed upstairs and a John Nesta tribute downstairs. I am looking forward to the upcoming poetry night featuring Jay Featherstone, Suzanne and others.

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MCC Cultural Districts convened at IDEO Cambridge & coming to Gloucester!

httpsdocs.google.comdocumentd17jdHbhxrV6xCqagHss5iOUjyBoB6BUQfbfmGAubPpvMeditusp=sharing x
Click here to Read the Gloucester downtown cultural district November 2017 save the date and cultural district reports from the MCC

SAVE THE DATE

November 8, 2017  North of Boston Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony will honor
Mayor Romeo Theken and Jeanne Hennessey, Beauport Hotel

November 11, 2017 2-6PM – Gloucester Meeting House Foundation Preservation & Architectural  Sustainability SYMPOSIUM  TownGreen|2025  Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church 

Monday, Nov. 27, 10 am, JOIN MASSACHUSETTS CULTURAL COUNCIL POWER OF CONNECTION TOUR at Gloucester’s Rocky Neck Art Colony, 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA 01930, with Mayor Romeo Theken, Senator Bruce Tarr & Representative Ann-Margaret Ferrante of Gloucester.  RSVP here.

November 29, 2017 Dogtown Public Presentation and Meeting- archaeological survey and pursuit of National Historic district designation  

December 17, 2017 Cape Ann Cinema & Stage Oscar winner Chris Cooper will personally host a screening of the role that won him the Gold for Best Supporting Actor…horticulturist John Laroche in Spike Jonze’s superb, darkly comic 2002 drama, “Adaptation.” The evening benefits The Jesse Cooper Foundation.

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Anita Walker, director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, welcome address October 2017 MCC cultural district convening held at IDEO Cambridge headquarters.
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Congrtulations to the original cultural districts– all renewed designation

Message from Anita Walker the Power of Culture- MCC has a new logo for its 50th year

Anita Walker message fall 2017

 

 

$12,000 grant opportunity for local artists and writers | Drawing, Printmaking, Poetry, Traditional arts

Mayor Romeo Theken always shares art news immediately! Please share. Dealers, tell your artists! Family and friends, encourage someone you know should try.

Here’s the announcement and deadline from the Massachusetts Cultural Council:

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The Massachusetts Cultural Council 2018 Artist Fellowship program opportunities have been announced!

October 2 deadline for drawing, poetry, printmaking, traditional arts

“Mass Cultural Council will accept applications in Choreography, Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, and Painting beginning December 15, 2017. Application deadline: January 29, 2018…Visit the MCC redesigned ArtSake blog, our online resource to support new art and Massachusetts artists. Every week, we round up a list of opportunities for artists – a way to find your next contest, artist residency, call to artists, publication, and more.”

Gloucester artist, Erica Daborn, was awarded an MCC fellowship grant in 2016.

MCC cultural districts

Gloucester portion of Massachusetts 2017 $9,000,000 arts funding celebrates Paul Manship and…

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Sculpture Garden outside Paul Manship residence/studio Lanesville village of Gloucester, MA  (photo taken after 1943 when he bought 14 acres abandoned quarry)

How did Gloucester stack up? $375,500

From the release (May 18, 2017 – New Bedford, MA) – 

“The Baker-Polito Administration and Massachusetts Cultural Council today announced $9.3 million in new awards from Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Fund (CFF), celebrating over $100 million in total cultural sector investments since the fund was established ten years ago. An additional $10 million in funding was included in the Baker-Polito Administration’s Fiscal Year 2018 Capital Budget Plan released last week…Over $100 million in CFF awards since 2007 have supported 772 building projects in the nonprofit arts, sciences and humanities, with total development costs of $2.6 billion, driving cultural tourism, job growth, and community vitality in cities and towns across Massachusetts. Over ten years CFF-funded projects have supported 8,512 full time jobs and $492 million in wages, employed 23,778 architects, engineers, contractors, and construction workers, and created 2,092 new permanent jobs…The new round of awards today includes 61 capital grants totaling about $8.9 million and another 18 planning grants totaling nearly $400,000. Grants range from $7,000 to $300,000, and must be matched one-to-one from private and/or other public sources. Learn more about the CFF.”

Scroll on to see the state’s Cultural Facilities Funding (CFF) totaling $367,000 plus Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) totaling $8500 breakdown for Gloucester.  Along with the categories below and others, make sure and think about next year’s application categories including the new festival grant category OPEN NOW.

MCC ARTIST FELLOWSHIP -$0

MCC BIG YELLOW SCHOOL BUS  – $400

O’Maley and Veterans $200 each for an educational field trip

CULTURAL FACILITIES FUND (CFF) – $367,000

Driven by the Boston Foundation, MA Advocates for the Arts, Sciences and Humanities (MAASH), the MCC and others after many years, this big pot that funds so many projects was part of legislation passed back in July of 2006. Complete list of the winners announced May 18, 2017. Gloucester received 3 awards:

UU is MA cultural facilities fundGloucester Meetinghouse Foundation, Gloucester
Project: Fire Safety and Detection Systems
Grant:
$130,000

About the Facility: The Federal Style edifice, completed in 1806, is the largest, oldest and last remaining historic Meetinghouse in Gloucester. It serves as a welcoming civic center, distinguished concert hall and hub for community events. About this Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation $130,000 for the installation of a comprehensive fire-sprinkler system, fire-proof insulation and new detection systems.

SAAM-J0085221SAAM-J0085220 (1)Manship Artist and Residence Studios (MARS)Gloucester
Project: Acquisition and Establishment of New Artist Residency
Grant: $207,000
About the Facility: Manship Artist and Residence Studios will preserve a local treasure with national significance and continue the legacy of Cape Ann’s historic community of artists by establishing an artist residency program at the renovated 15+ acre property of sculptor Paul Manship. About the Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded Manship Artist and Residence Studios $207,000 to purchase the Manship property in Gloucester, which will be transformed into an artist educational facility and gallery place. In 2016, MARS received $30,000 to conduct a feasibility study for the renovation of the Manship property as an arts and culture center with an artist residency program.

Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester
Grant: $30,000 Feasibility & Technical Assistance Grants
About this Project: The Cultural Facilities Fund awarded the Cape Ann Museum $30,000 for architectural studies and strategic planning assistance to explore expansion and facility improvements, informed by programmatic need and a 2016 Systems Replacement Plan.

MCC CULTURAL INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO- $0

MCC JOHN AND ABIGAIL ADAMS ART PROGRAM – $0

FESTIVALS PROGRAM– $500

St Peter’s Fiesta

–NEW GRANT OPEN–Festivals Taking Place September 1, 2017 – February 28, 2018
Online application available: June 2017
Preliminary funding decisions begin: September 1, 2017
Application deadline: September 15, 2017 at 5 PM (ET)
Grants announced: October 2017

MCC LOCAL CULTURAL COUNCIL (LCC)-  $7600

Allocation Gloucester $7,600 Thanks LCC volunteers on the committee for processing the applications every year

Alicia Quintano, Lucille LePage and

2017 / 2016

$911 / $450

Cape Ann Shakespeare Troupe $295 / $348
Cape Ann Symphony $200
Community Band, Cape Ann $500
DiPrima, Jay $300 / $250
East Gloucester Elementary School PTO $500 / $300
Ethnic Arts Center $400 / $400
Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library $500 (1 grant) / $964 (2 grants)
Gloucester Writers Center $300
Mark Chester Diversity Project and MIRA Coalition, a 501(c)3 $300
Mass Audubon Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary $200
Northeast MA Youth Orchestras, Inc. $500
Rockport Music $250 / $400
Sarah Slifer Swift $400 / $400
Sheehan, Rose $960 / $500
Sheehan, Rose $800 / $450
Sheehan, Rose $800
Summer Concert Series, Antonio Gentile Bandstand $500
Wendy Manninen, Vicki Marsh & $400 / $300
Windhover Foundation $500 / $700

LAST YEAR’S GMG POST: 2016 THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE! NEARLY $310,000 GLOUCESTER PIECE OF MA’S ART FUNDING PIE *some of the grants announced in 2016 span more than one year (if they were listed last year I did not repeat them into this year)

SAAM-J0085224.jpg

 

SAAM-J0085222
Paul Manship Gloucester property

GMG Post- Gloucester at the MET Paul Manship Three Bears, Anna Hyatt Huntington…