Lobster Cove: Gloucester DPW rebuilding stone wall along Washington Street / 127 (and brush clearing at Bennett)

Brett Chelsea and John_Gloucester DPW stone wall repair Lobster Cove_ Washington Street_Rt 127_20191009_© c Ryan.jpg
Brett, John, Chelsea – DPW crew covers their masonry work in progress on the stone wall by Lobster Cove October 9, 2019, ahead of a forecast nor’easter, Gloucester, Mass.

CAUTION- slow down!

Gloucester DPW crews are restoring the old stone fence along Washington Street/Rt 127 between the Annisquam footbridge and Annisquam Church. They are filling and resetting capstone and top stone along its length and attending to areas of greater disrepair. The fence on this route has been hit by cars more than once. Estimates for contracting the work went far outside the department’s budget. Thankfully, Gloucester DPW is up to the city maintenance of a traditional public works build.  They began the job last week (see below)

BEFORE (and one in process/mortar)

 

AFTER

So far- Gloucester DPW is just a fraction of the way into this project. They’ll tackle sections at a time.

Gloucester DPW repairing capstone and topstone by Lobster Cove Gloucester MA_20191009_©c ryan (2)

Gloucester DPW repairing capstone and topstone by Lobster Cove Gloucester MA_20191009_©c ryan (1)

Goose Cove

Gloucester DPW repaired the stone wall at Goose Cove (also hit)

Gloucester DPW stone wall repairs Goose Cove Bridge _20191009_© c ryan.jpg

Nearby another DPW crew completed much needed roadside overgrowth clearing on Bennett Street up towards Dennison Street

Before (Google Street view) / After

 

1959 Lyman boat for sale calls forth irresistible young adult book, Driftwood Captain, by Paul B Kenyon

1959 Lyman boat for sale_20180917_Gloucester Mass ©Catherine Ryan (4).jpg

Scroll down for more photos of the boat that’s for sale which had me remembering a great read. Excerpted quotes are from the superb young adult book, Driftwood Captain, from 1956 by Paul B Kenyon, a writer and Gloucester Daily Times columnist and editor, with illustrations by Louise Kenyon, folly cove artist. The book is dedicated to their sons.  I guarantee explorers young and old will be inspired to seek treasure and adventure all about them and persist. Kids you know will want to befriend characters so real they jump off the page and grab your heart. Sometimes authors get in the way of their own writing, especially with children’s books, trying too hard and overwriting the kid’s perspective. Not Kenyon. Boy is he a timeless ease. You can find the book at Cape Ann Museum and local book stores.

“…But Pete had the faith of a twelve-year-old in his sailing skill and in his flighty boat, a hunk of a fisherman’s dory. He had been sailing in Lobster Cove since he graduated from floating logs. He knew the breezes and currents and even the ways that certain boats swung at each other. He would put on dark glasses to shield his eyes from the angry glare of visiting yachtsmen, and sail close to the boats of his customers so that he could toss folded newspapers into cockpits and cabins. He was a seagoing paperboy…

“He’d rather have the old hull lying on shore, tied to a tree just above the bridge. He liked her rugged looks and her air of being what Gloucester men called “able.”

“The old hull reminded Pete of the famous sloop Spray, Captain Joshua Slocum rebuilt the Spray, timber by timber and sailed her around the world singlehanded, after he finished fitting out at Gloucester. The Spray was thirty six feet long, not counting her bowsprit. She had a lot of room for a boat of her length. So had the hold hull that had lain unused for years. That’s where Pete had begun the daydream that had led to the Hunkadory-Harbor-Queen argument. Pete wondered why his family did not share his fondness for the hull. Pappy Leonard talked a lot about getting a boat big enough for cruising along the coast.

Here was a boat in the rough, just the right size…” 

 

1959 Lyman boat for sale as is, dry dock @ Shaw’s shopping center, Gloucester, Mass,

 

the old hull_LOUISE KENYON_stellar linocut illustrations for Driftwood Captain by Paul B Kenyon 1956butch Petes dog_LOUISE KENYON_stellar linocut illustrations for Driftwood Captain by Paul B Kenyon 1956

Annisquam then and now | DPW and Greenbelt team up at Lobster Cove new land preserve to solve access at narrow and blind corner on Leonard Street

annisquam village circa 1901

In 2017, donations of $650,000 were secured to preserve four acres of Lobster Cove acquired by Essex County Greenbelt Ed Becker and Dave Rimmer working with the city staff (DPW Mike Hale, Ken Whittaker, Community Development) and many in the community. The property is co-owned by Mt. Adnah Cemetery.

Wilman Trail

Recently DPW teamed up with Greenbelt to scrub out trees, rocks, earth and stone to grade a pedestrian path along its Leonard Street stretch at the landing past Annisquam Church. Widening Leonard Street because of its variable and intermittent scale would be a very expensive and perhaps unwelcome project. This quick jaunt seems like a thoughtful solution to support safe access and property exploration in a tricky spot.

 

Essex County Greenbelt Annisquam Wilman Trail Lobster Cove Gloucester MA _20180702_©c ryan (5)

‘Squam rock has some practice boulders

No longer hidden by overgrowth, beautifully balanced granite outcroppings were exposed. If you look just so you might see the lines of a baby shorebird under wing or is that just me? Hmmm… Mother Ann, Squam Rock and baby Bird Rock.

Annisquam nestled bird rock_20180702_054907©c ryan

 

CAPE ANN TRAIL STEWARDS

Good Morning Gloucester received a nice note of appreciation from Cape Ann Trail Stewards president Nick Holland. I went to their website to learn more about Cape Ann Trail Stewards. They are a non-profit, all volunteer coalition founded in 2012 and their primary focus is on helping municipal landowners and conservation organizations protect, maintain, and expand Cape Ann’s trail network. They match volunteer trail stewards to trails in need of stewardship, and organize trail work parties.

I am super excited to learn more and looking forward to exploring some trails with Nick. Thank you for writing and letting us know!!

Cape Ann Trail Stewards Mission Statement: Trails, from meandering paths to stony fire roads, connect Cape Ann communities across borders, public and private land, and diverse natural landscapes. CATs helps to maintain existing trails, improve access and promote the responsible and safe use of the Cape Ann trail system and recreational areas. CATs works with municipalities and like-minded conservation organizations to protect and preserve land for its recreational and ecological values. CATs promotes the understanding of the wildlife and natural resources of our woodlands and wetlands.

GOOD MORNING GLOUCESTER BROUGHT TO YOU BY LOBSTER COVE!

Glorious autumn color–everywhere you turn, Cape Ann foliage is beginning to peak! Snapshots from a walk along Lobster Cove this morning.

great-blue-heron-lobster-cove-copyright-kim-smithGreat Blue Heron feeding in the flatsfall-foliage-maple-leaves-2-copyright-kim-smith

Brilliantly colored maple leaves, although looking a bit dog-eared from Winter Moth damagefall-foliage-maple-leaves-copyright-kim-smith

fall-foliage-lobster-cove-copyright-kim-smithgreat-blue-heron-in-the-marsh-copyright-kim-smith

Author Deborah Cramer asks were there plentiful horseshoe crabs in Gloucester? Leads to Winslow Homer, John Bell, and Cher Ami

Deborah Cramer thanks Good Morning Gloucester for mentioning her book and asks for photographs and stories about horseshoe crabs, otherwise known as the nearly scene stealing co-stars from her inspiring book on red knots (sandpiper shorebirds), The Narrow Edge.

“I’m in the midst of a project right now trying to uncover the almost forgotten history of the whereabouts of horseshoe crabs in Gloucester.  I’ve heard some fantastic stories, like one from a man who used to go down to Lobster Cove after school and find horseshoe crabs so plentiful he could fill a dory. Do you think there’s a value to putting up a few pictures on GMG and asking people to send in their recollections of beaches, coves where they used to see them in abundance?”

We do. Please send in photos or stories if you have them about horseshoe crabs in Gloucester or the North Shore for Deborah Cramer’s project. Write in comments below and/or email cryan225@gmail.com

Here’s one data point. Look closely at this 1869 Winslow Homer painting. Can you spot the horseshoe crabs? Can you identify the rocks and beach?

Winslow Homer Rocky Coast and Gulls (manchester)
Winslow Homer, Rocky Coast and Gulls, 1869, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, installed in room #234 with so many other Homers (Fog Warning, All’s Well, Driftwood, …)
zoomed into horseshoe crabs (detail )
(zoomed into horseshoe crabs)

cr 2015 mfa

 

While reading The Narrow Edge, and looking at Kim Smith’s Piping Plover photographs, I thought about Raid on a Sand Swallow Colony (How Many Eggs?) 1873 by Homer and how some things change while much remains the same.When my sons were little, they were thrilled with the first 1/3 or so of Swiss Family Robinson.  As taken as they were with the family’s ingenuity, adventure, and tree house–they recoiled as page after page described a gorgeous new bird, promptly shot. They wouldn’t go for disturbing eggs in a wild habitat. The title ascribed to this Homer, perhaps the eager query from the clambering youngest boy, feels timeless. Was the boys’ precarious gathering sport, study, or food? What was common practice with swallows’ eggs in the 1860s and 70s? Homer’s birds are diminutive and active, but imprecise. Homer sometimes combined place, figures, subject and themes. One thing is clear: the composition, line and shadow are primed and effective for an engraving.

 

Homer watercolor 1873

Harper’s Weekly published the image on June 13, 1875. Artists often drew directly on the edge grain of boxwood and a master engraver (Lagrade in this case) removed the wood from pencil and wash lines.

Winslow Homer

 

2016. Wingaersheek dunes and nests 140+ years later.

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Continue reading “Author Deborah Cramer asks were there plentiful horseshoe crabs in Gloucester? Leads to Winslow Homer, John Bell, and Cher Ami”

Lobster Cove, Magnolia, Stage Fort Park,Schooner Adventure, Maritime Gloucester Under Snow From Peter Dorsey #GloucesterMA

Peter Dorsey submits-
The Bridgewater footbridge which crosses an icy Lobster Cove

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A snowy Lobster Cove from the beginning of Leonard Street

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The Schooner Adventure on Maritime Gloucester’s main pier, and looking toward East Gloucester

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Stage Fort Park full of snow from the Blizzards of 2015

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Magnolia Beach looking toward Coolidge Point, Manchester

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Peter Fortune- Annisquam

Hello Again Joey:  I have been scouring the internet for more relevant articles and photographs
for the listing on the Annisquam Village wooden bridge over Lobster Cove I wrote about previously :
http://bridgehunter.com/ma/essex/bh63113/http://bridgehunter.com/ma/essex/bh63113/ .
I did just come across and added to that site the wonderful 2013 article on Cape Ann, Gloucester and
The Village of Annisquam by Peter Fortune. I highly recommend checking it out for Cape Ann history
buffs and anyone who wants to understand SQUAM (starting on page 15). It is very enjoyable reading.
Download and read it at this link directly- http://www.fortunearchive.com/Boating/Top%20Cruising%20Spots/Cape%20Ann.pdf
Regards Bob Lindberg

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Birds of Cape Ann: How to Tell the Difference Between a Snowy Egret and a Great Egret

Great egret Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2014Great Egret

For the Chief, and anyone who wants a quick and easy reference on how to tell the difference between the Snowy and Great Egrets, both white and both often times found feeding in the marsh and tide pools together. The Great Egret is greater in size and has a bright yellow bill, with black legs and black feet. The smaller Snowy Egret has the opposite markings, with unmistakeable cadmium yellow feet and a black bill.
Great Egret Snowwy Egret how to tell the difference ©Kim Smith 2014

Snowy Egret and Great Egret

In the above photo taken this morning, the egrets were too far away for my camera’s lens to get a really clear picture however, when cropped, you can see a side-by-side comparison. The Snowy Egret, with black bill and bright yellow feet, is flying in the background and the Great Egret, with black feet and yellow bill, is perched.

Great Egret lobster Cove Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2014Great Egret Lobster Cove

More posts about Great Egret and Snowy Egrets:

BIRDS OF CAPE ANN: GREAT EGRET VS. GREAT EGRET

BEAUTIFUL GOOD HARBOR FOGGY MORNING SUNRISE, SNOWY EGRET, AND WHIMBRELS

Lobster Cove, 1916

The peninsula called Annisquam is bordered by Ipswich Bay (Atlantic Ocean), the Annisquam River (which makes Gloucester an island), and Lobster Cove. The cove is protected, and therefore a preferred anchorage and mooring area. Judging by the lack of boats in Lobster Cove, this looks to be spring (May 26th to be exact). Annisquam is across the cove, and Wingaersheek is in the distance across the Annisquam River. The geography of Cape Ann is a visual buffet for photographers and painters, and its beauty is here for all to enjoy.
The peninsula called Annisquam is bordered by Ipswich Bay (Atlantic Ocean), the Annisquam River (which makes Gloucester an island), and Lobster Cove. The cove is protected, and therefore a preferred anchorage and mooring area. Judging by the lack of boats in Lobster Cove, this looks to be spring (May 26th to be exact). Annisquam is across the cove, and Wingaersheek is in the distance across the Annisquam River. The geography of Cape Ann is a visual buffet for photographers and painters, and its beauty is here for all to enjoy.

Market Restaurant On Lobster Cove Gulf Coast Benefit Dinner

Market Restaurant On Lobster Cove writes-

This coming Thursday, June 10th 2010: Join us for a special 3-course fixed menu featuring the seafood of the Gulf Coast.  Proceeds will be sent to aid the fishermen and their families — refugees of environmental disaster.

33 River Rd

Gloucester, MA 01930

For More About The Market  Restaurant On Lobster Cove Check The Coverage Here

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The Market Restaurant On Lobster Cove

Lobster Cove- It Doesn’t Suck

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If you haven’t heard from every food blogger known to man on the North Shore there is a huge buzz about The Market Restaurant On Lobster Cove.

Due to things ramping up down the dock and a huge swell of coverage by far better writers than me I figured I leave the foodie coverage to the real food writers and get over there as soon as I could with video camera in hand to do what I like to do best- In person video interviews with pictures  of people telling me what it’s all about in their own words.

Until I can get there, check out all the raving reviews this place has got from my blogging buddies in it’s short time open-

North Shore Dish

Food For Thought

First Tastes: The Market at Lobster Cove

Deliciousness from the market restaurant on lobster cove

Dinner at Market Restaurant, Gloucester

This Little Piggie Went to The Market Restaurant on Lobster Cove

They Also Tweet-image

The Folks that are running the joint worked at a famous place in California named famous Chez Panisse. The local twitter foodies have been wetting themselves over the prospect of a couple of chefs from famous Chez Panisse coming home to cook for us so there must be something worth checking out.  I’m looking forward to meeting them and giving y’all the inside skinny.