Dogtown Days 2018 research updates and special events! Cape Ann Museum May 5 & ribbon cutting May 6

Dogtown Days 2018

Dogtown Days 2018

 

CAPE ANN MUSEUM PROGRAM, SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m

“This program, presented by the Friends of Dogtown, offers an opportunity to remember the past and imagine the future of Dogtown. Free and open to the public.

Starting off with a presentation by local artists recalling Thoreau’s 1858 visit to Dogtown, Dogtown Days will present a collection of newly discovered historical photographs of the early 20th century landscape and will debut new poetry inspired by the “ghosts” of the old settlement. Members of the Gloucester Historical Commission will review the history of archaeological investigations, including the recent survey of Dogtown, and will explain the process and implications of its inclusion in the National Register of Historical Places. The City of Gloucester’s Dogtown Advisory Committee and privately-supported Cape Ann Trail Stewards will describe ongoing projects including site cleanup, trail maintenance, and the construction of a new footbridge at the site of Gloucester’s first mill. The program will conclude with a presentation by members of the Friends of Dogtown on a new project that is underway to restore key historical, ecological, and art landscapes in Dogtown.”

ENTRANCE TO DOGTOWN –RIBBON CUTTING – SUNDAY MAY 6th 10am-noon

“celebrating the new footbridge constructed by Gloucester High School students followed by tours of the art, ecological and historical landscapes described on Saturday.”

2016 PDF vision for dogtown (maybe visitor center)

#GloucesterMA national news | Delaware Art Museum John Sloan retrospective

Gloucester, MA is one of four featured walls –and the backdrop for this interview– in the major retrospective exhibition,  AN AMERICAN JOURNEY THE ART OF JOHN SLOAN at the Delaware Art Museum through January 28, 2018. “The exhibition includes nearly 100 works–drawings, prints, and paintings–produced between 1890 and 1946. The Delaware Art Museum holds the largest collection of work by the American artist and illustrator John Sloan, as well as a rich trove of archival materials. This exhibition draws from and celebrates this extraordinary collection, made possible by the artist’s widow Helen Farr Sloan.” The Cape Ann Museum has five Sloan paintings and featured dozens of Sloan’s Gloucester paintings in a major 2015 exhibition.

2017 Video and excerpt from the Brian Drouin WHYY report and interview with Heather Campbell Coyle, Chief Curator at the Delaware Art Museum, on the occassion of the Delaware Art Museum major John Sloan Retrospective.

“His brightest colors are probably when he is working outdoors in Gloucester, Massachusetts from 1914-1918.” By this time Sloan would have been exposed to European painters. “The work of Cézanne, the work of Matisse, the work of Vincent van Gogh, and all of those artists are influencing his work as well,” Coyle said.

Curator Coyle interviewed Delaware Art Museum in front of Gloucester wall of John Sloan retrospective

GloucesterCast 242 With Phil Hayward, Bill Whiting, Kim Smith, Nicole Bogin, Karen Pischke, Sharon St Clair and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

GloucesterCast 242 With Phil Hayward, Bill Whiting, Kim Smith, Nicole Bogin, Karen Pischke, Sharon St Clair and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

When you subscribe you need to verify your email address so they know we’re not sending you spam and that you want to receive the podcast. So once you subscribe check your email for that verification. If you don’t see it, check your spam folder in your email acct so you can verify that you’d like to get the GloucesterCast Podcast sent to you for listening at your convenience..

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GMG Podcast No. 242 copyright Kim Smith

Topics Include:

Gloucester Gig Rowing- Gloucester Gig Rowers 2017 International Regatta www.gloucestergigrowers.org

Cape Ann Farmer’s Market

Harvest Festival

Phyllis A Art Show At East Gloucester Marine Railways

Thanks To James Eves At Cape Ann Giclee For Hanging My Artwork Yesterday See- YESSSSS!

Love Fest

John Nesta Passed Click Here For Many Posts Over The Years With John Nesta

Salt Island For Sale

Catherine Ryan Crushing Her Posts

Game Changer Links- Ugg Slippers , Victorinox Inexpensive Dangerously Sharp Knives, Double Insulated Beer Can Coolers , Double Insulated Tumblers

Ban On Polystyrene Was Passed – Discussed Ban on Single Use Plastic Bags

Clue is a female health app that uses science and data to help you discover the unique patterns in your cycle. It reminds you about your period, PMS and fertile window. https://xq5r.app.link/UetVXmP57A

Monarch Migration Update www.journeynorth.org

Primary Is Tuesday Night

Can major Gloucester paintings by Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer come back home? Appealing to Bill Gates and private collectors: please remember Gloucester!

Legions of fans visit local, national and international museums to see icons of American 20th century art by Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer. Some of this art was inspired by Gloucester, MA. One more Hopper or Homer Gloucester scene in any collection would be welcome, but in Gloucester it would be transformative.

The City of Gloucester boasts a world class museum that would be the ideal repository for a major Hopper and Homer of Gloucester. It hasn’t happened, yet. It should! I feel not enough of a case has been made for having originals right here in the city that inspired some of their most famous works and changed their art for the better.

Edward Hopper Captain’s House (Parkhurst House), one of the few original Hopper works remaining in private hands, is slated as a promised gift to Arkansas’s Crystal Bridges Museum of  American Art. Crystal Bridges opened in 2011 and will have acquired 4 examples of Hopper’s art — 2 paintings, 1 drawing and 1 print–with this gift. (I think Arkansas would have been ok with 3.)

Edward Hopper Parkhurst's House Captain's House 1924 watercolor private collection 100+ Gloucester homes and vistas inspired Hopper

 

The only known Winslow Homer seascape painting still in private hands is a great one inspired by Gloucester. Bill and Melinda Gates own Lost on the Grand Banks, 1885.  I saw it at the auction house back in 1998 just before the sale.  What a fit for Gloucester and Homer if it found its way back here!

 

Winslow Homer Lost on the Grand Banks 1885

 

Edward Hopper’s Gloucester Street also went to the west coast, purchased by Robert Daly. I’d love to see this one in person! The corner hasn’t changed much since 1928 when Hopper painted the street scene.

 

Gloucester Street edward hopper painting

Gloucester street painted by Edward Hopper TODAY.jpg

 

Hopper’s downtown Gloucester scene, Railroad Gates, is not on public display.

Edward Hopper Railroad Gates Gloucester MA

I’m surprised and hopeful that there are paintings of Gloucester by Hopper that could be secured. There are tens of drawings including major works on paper. I saw this Gloucester drawing, Circus Wagon, by Edward Hopper at the ADAA art Fair back in March 2016.

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Davis House (25 Middle Street) was sold at auction in 1996.

Edward Hopper Davis House, Middle Street Gloucester MA.jpg

I’m keeping tabs on most of them. The only way they’re going into any museum is through largesse. Why not Gloucester?

Homer and Hopper watercolors in private collections can’t be on permanent view due to the medium’s fragility. (Exciting developments in glazing and displays are being developed that go beyond the protective lift.) The Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester, MA, cares for works of art as well as any institution.

 

 

What if…a section of Dogtown brush was cleared away? If you missed Chris Leahy at Sawyer Free Library last week come to a summit by Essex County Greenbelt & Mass Audubon at Cape Ann Museum March 4

“This Saturday morning forum is offered in collaboration with Essex County Greenbelt, Friends of Dogtown, Lanesville Community Center and Mass Audubon and held at Cape Ann Museum. The forum will be moderated by Ed Becker, President of the Essex County Greenbelt Association.”

Register here

UPDATE: Cape Ann TV is scheduled to film the event!

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Edward Hopper Cape Ann Pasture watercolor drawing (ca.1928) was gifted to Yale University in 1930
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East Gloucester Atwood’s Gallery on the Moors as seen on the left in 1921–open vistas at that time

 

Chris Leahy gave a presentation at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library on February 23, 2017: Dogtown- the Biography of a Landscape: 750 Million Years Ago to the Present
A photographic history through slides presented by the Gloucester Lyceum and the Friends of the Library. Mary Weissblum opened the program.

Chris broadly covered the history of the local landscape from an ecological bent with a bias to birds and blueberry picking, naturally. New England is a patchwork of forested landscapes. He stressed the evolution of bio diversity and succession phenomenon when the earth and climate change. “Nature takes a lot of courses.” He focused on Dogtown, “a very special place”, and possible merits of land stewardship geared at fostering greater biodiversity. Perhaps some of the core acres could be coaxed to grasslands as when parts of Gloucester were described as moors? Characteristic wildlife, butterflies, and birds no longer present may swing back.  There were many philosophical takeaways and tips: he recommends visiting the dioramas “Changes in New England Landscape” display at Harvard Forest HQ in Petersham.

“Isolation of islands is a main driver of evolution”

“Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary in Worcester has the highest concentration* of native butterflies in all of Massachusetts because of secondary habitats.”  *of Mass Audubon’s c.40,000 acres of wildlife sanctuaries statewide. “The fact that Brook Meadow Brook is in greater Worcester, rather than a forested wilderness, underscores the value of secondary habitats.”

“1830– roughly the time of Thoreau (1817-1862)– was the maximum period of clearing thus the heyday for grasslands…As farmsteads were abandoned, stages of forests return.”

Below are photos from February 23, 2017. I added some images of art inspired by Dogtown. I also pulled out a photograph by Frank L Cox, David Cox’s father, of Gallery on the Moors  (then) compared with a photo of mine from 2011 to illustrate how the picturesque description wasn’t isolated to Dogtown.

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Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Granite, 1928, oil on canvas can we get this painting into the Cape Ann Museum collection?

dogtown-cape-ann-massachuestts-by-louise-upton-brumback-o-c-vose-galleryLouise Upton Brumback (1867-1929), Dogtown- Cape Ann, 1920 oil on canvas

atwood-cox-gallery-on-the-moors-photo-1921

FRIENDS! DON’T MISS JOHN SLOAN GLOUCESTER DAYS AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

FRIENDS! DON’T MISS JOHN SLOAN GLOUCESTER DAYS AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

(Delaware)OurRedCottage,Lilacs[1]Red Cottage is located on East Main Street, across from the entrance to Rocky Neck, and is still painted red!

Beautifully curated by Martha Oaks, from museums around the nation, the exhibit comprises a stellar collection of canvases painted by John Sloan (1871-1951) during the five summers he spent on Cape Ann. I know how much everyone enjoys Hopper’s Houses and it is a joy to see scenes of our community expressed through the eye and brush strokes of Sloan, one of our country’s most celebrated early 20th century painters, and a leader in the Ash Can School of painting.

As was I, you will be thoroughly delighted by the approximately three dozen paintings of our neighborhood, scenes of Gloucester’s Main Street, Rocky Neck sunflowers, the former US government fish hatchery on Ten Pound Island, the trolley along East Main Street, fashions and sentiments of the period, and a wealth more of Gloucester captured in the midst of everyday life during the transitional years of the first World War.

Image: John Sloan (1871-1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. [2008.14]

“A Landscape is a Portrait of Place” ~ Sunflowers by John Sloan

Of the approximately 1200 canvases painted by Sloan, 300 are of Cape Ann. One of my favorites of the favorites is Red Cottage, summer home to he and his wife Dolly during the artist’s highly productive Cape Ann years.

Sloan - Our Red Cottage

Red Cottage and Daniel Gill Fisherman House, Built 1847

John Sloan Red Cottage Gloucester ©Kim Smith 2015

I’ll return to take a photo of Red Cottage in prettier light, rather than today’s sunny high noon skies.

John Sloan Gloucester Days runs through the end of November. The last lecture in the series of three, Passing through Gloucester: John Sloan between City and Country will be presented by Michael Lobel on Friday October 30th. For more information visit the Cape Ann Museum website.

Credits:

Our Red Cottage, Lilacs, 1917 Oil on canvas. Delaware Art Museum. Gift of Helen Farr Sloan, 2000. © 2015 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

John Sloan (1871–1951), Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum. Gift of Alfred Mayor and Martha M. Smith, 2008. ©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

John Sloan (1871–1951), Our Red Cottage, 1916. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. ©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

 

John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship at the Cape Ann Museum

John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 31, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship on Thursday, August 13 at 7:00 p.m. This is the second of three lectures offered in conjunction with the John Sloan Gloucester Days exhibition on view at the Museum through November 29, 2015. The exhibition will be open for viewing prior to the lecture from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Presented by Avis Berman, an independent writer, art historian, and author of Rebels on Eighth Street: Juliana Force and the Whitney Museum of American Art; James McNeill Whistler; and Edward Hopper’s New York.

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Self-Portrait, Working, 1916
Oil on canvas
Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire
Gift of John and Helen Farr Sloan
©2015 Delaware Art Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

High resolution image available on request.

When we consider the subject of portraits of artists, our first thoughts tend to be of likenesses painted on canvas, etched on a plate, or exposed on a negative. But equally compelling in the study of artists and why they make the images they do are those portraits deduced and composed from the examination of psychological and social motivations. This sort of portrayal based on deeper emotional currents is especially revealing in the case of the American painter and printmaker, John Sloan. Sloan could not have matured into the artist he was without the catalytic interlocking relationships he sustained with two other forceful personalities—the painters Robert Henri and John Butler Yeats. The power of these artists’ intense, transformative personal and intellectual friendships—friendships that became central experiences, opened doors to new worlds, and were precious founts of support and inspiration—does much to explain many facets of Sloan’s life and work. The three men’s association also had more general consequences for American art—it was a great influence on drawings, paintings, and prints produced by a number of outstanding artists in Sloan and Henri’s orbit.

Tickets are $10 for members and $15 for non-members. For more information, please call (978)283-0455 x10 or emailinfo@capeannmuseum.org.

The third lecture in the series, presented by Michael Lobel on October 30, will be Passing through Gloucester: John Sloan Between City and Country.


About the exhibition:
One of this country’s most important artists of the early 20th century and a highly respected teacher, John Sloan (1871-1951) spent five summers—1914 through 1918—living and working on Cape Ann. During that time he created nearly 300 finished oil paintings, using Gloucester’s rugged landscape as a backdrop to experiment with color and explore ideas about form, texture and light. Arguably the most productive period of his career, the body of work that Sloan created during this time continues to astonish and delight viewers a century after it was completed.

The Cape Ann Museum is proud to have five major works by John Sloan in its permanent collection:  Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914; Old Cone (Uncle Sam), 1914; Glare on the Bay, c.1914; Red Warehouses at Gloucester, 1914; and Dogtown, Ruined Blue Fences, 1916.  Approximately 30 additional works, drawn from public and private collections across the country, will also be on display.


Exhibition Sponsors:

John Sloan Gloucester Days is sponsored by Carpenter & MacNeille Architects and Builders, Inc. and by Cape Ann Savings Trust & Financial Services.


John Sloan Lecture Series at the Cape Ann Museum

Sloan-BreezyDayGloucesterMA

Breezy Day Gloucester by John Sloan

Three Moderns Paint Gloucester: Sloan, Hartley, and Hopper on Cape Ann

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 10, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Three Moderns Paint Gloucester: Sloan, Hartley, and Hopper on Cape Ann on July 23 at 7:00 p.m. This is the first in a series of three lectures being offered in conjunction with the John Sloan Gloucester Days exhibition on view at the Museum through November 29, 2015.

Presented by Carol Troyen, an independent scholar and author, and the Kristin and Roger Servison Curator Emerita of American Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Although they never overlapped in Gloucester, three of the greatest painters of the early 20th century – John Sloan, Edward Hopper, and Marsden Hartley – spent significant parts of their careers on Cape Ann. The three artists’ responses to the region differed markedly, but the area’s appealing vistas led each to a new and modern style. The lecture will trace their steps through Gloucester and compare what each found there.

Tickets for the lecture series are $10 for members and $15 for non-members. For the series, tickets are $25 for members and $40 for non-members. For more information, call 978-283-0455 x10 or email:info@capeannmuseum.org.

The series continues with John Sloan, Robert Henri, and John Butler Yeats: A Portrait of Friendship presented by Avis Berman on August 13th and Passing through Gloucester: John Sloan Between City and Country presented by Michael Lobel on October 30th.
sloanjohn_IMG_6717.jpg.670x560_q85

About the exhibition:

One of this country’s most important artists of the early 20th century and a highly respected teacher, John Sloan (1871-1951) spent five summers—1914 through 1918—living and working on Cape Ann. During that time he created nearly 300 finished oil paintings, using Gloucester’s rugged landscape as a backdrop to experiment with color and explore ideas about form, texture and light. Arguably the most productive period of his career, the body of work that Sloan created during this time continues to astonish and delight viewers a century after it was completed.

The Cape Ann Museum is proud to have five major works by John Sloan in its permanent collection:  Sunflowers, Rocky Neck, 1914; Old Cone (Uncle Sam), 1914; Glare on the Bay, c.1914; Red Warehouses at Gloucester, 1914; andDogtown, Ruined Blue Fences, 1916.  Approximately 30 additional works, drawn from public and private collections across the country, will also be on display.

Exhibition Sponsors:

John Sloan Gloucester Days is sponsored by Carpenter & MacNeille Architects and Builders, Inc. and by Cape Ann Savings Trust & Financial Services.

sloan2-300x242