CAPE ANN WILDLIFE REHABBER JODI SWENSON ON FOX NEWS SPEAKING ABOUT RAT POISON KILLING OUR LOCAL WILDLIFE

LINK HERE TO SEE THE FOX NEWS SEGMENT

GLOUCESTER, Mass. – Wildlife rehabilitators are urging residents and business owners not to use rat poison as it is suspected in the deaths of three foxes and a coyote in Gloucester in recent weeks, as well as countless other animals.

The latest fox was found dead on Good Harbor Beach Tuesday morning.

Jodi Swenson, head of Cape Ann Wildlife Inc., said she has taken in too many animals that have died slow, painful deaths from secondary rodenticide poisoning.

Residents and business owners are leaving rat poison outside, killing mice and rats, which are then eaten by bigger predators, including foxes, chipmunks, raccoons and birds of prey.

“It’s a horrendous way to die. They’re basically bleeding out,” Swenson said. “It’s sad, and it’s maddening because we know [the fox] most likely ate a poisoned mouse or rat. He’s trying to do his job, and he’s dying for it.”

Jane Newhouse, the owner of Newhouse Wildlife Rescue of Chelmsford, said she has taken in more animals suffering from rodenticide poisoning than those hit by cars.

“Of all the things that I see, this is one of the worst things we as humans do to our wildlife,” Newhouse said. “Often, [the bigger animals] might eat one rat or mouse that has it and it’ll be in their system for a while.”

Newhouse treated a four-month-old fox that, testing showed, had ingested three different kinds of rodent poison over the course of its short life. She also cared for a pregnant raccoon that went into early labor. All of the animals died.

“It was probably the worst thing I’ve witnessed as a wildlife rehabilitator, not only to see her go through it and to see the amount of suffering that that poor mama endured, but then to have lost all the babies inside her,” Newhouse said.

As the natural predators of rats and mice are killed off, the rodent problem is only getting worse, Newhouse said.

“If you kill your local bird of prey, your local hawk who usually kills a thousand rodents a year, what’s going to happen is yes, temporarily your issue is solved, but it’s going to come back with a vengeance, and you’re going to have way more,” Newhouse said.

Newhouse is working on testing as many animals as possible for rodenticide poisoning to get solid numbers to bring to the state in order to get the legislature to ban rodent poison.

“If you’ve ever witnessed the slow death that rodenticide is, you’d absolutely be on board with banning this stuff,” Newhouse said. “It’s awful. It’s awful for the animals.”

Wildlife rescuers urge the public to use other alternatives to rodent poison, including prevention – simply limiting trash and food outside and sealing off entrances to shelter for rodents. If necessary, quick-kill snap traps are a better option than bait, experts say.

The above graphics are printable small poster size. The black and white one is great for kids to color.

 

JODI FROM CAPE ANN WILDLIFE NEEDS OUR HELP LOCATING RAVEN FAMILY

CAPE ANN WILDLIFE NEEDS OUR HELP LOCATING RAVEN FAMILY NEAR POST OFFICE

Jodi writes, “Hi Kim, hoping you can write something up about the Ravens who nested in town by the post office. I got the fledgling yesterday and he is emaciated but I’m hoping his stay will be short. What I need to know is where his parents are spending their their time so I can reunite him with them hopefully next week. Erinn Whitamore from Sharon Audubon said Ravens tend to stick to their territory and have a daily routine they pretty much stick to. Posts about him are on the Cape Ann Wildlife if you have time to look thru it. I need the public’s help on this one, I don’t have the time to search for them myself.”

Readers, if you have seen a Raven family near the post office downtown, please write in the comment section below and we will get in touch with Jodi. Thank you so much for any help given!

Not sure if you have a Raven or a Crow nest? Check out this helpful post from Audubon

How to Tell a Raven From a Crow

Clockwise from top left: Common Raven; American Crow; American Crow; Common Raven

 

FUNDRAISER FOR CAPE ANN WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR ERIN HUTCHINGS

Message from Erin – Big thank you to Jodi Swenson!!! Just look at all the goodies she got me from my “Wildlife List” on Amazon!! As you know, we do not get paid to rehab wildlife, we rely solely on donations or it comes out of our own pocket. Now that I’m State and Federally permitted to rehab wildlife I’m going to have even more patients this year! Donations to Cape Ann Wildlife or my “Wildlife List” on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/3SGHHZJ5OBGN0… are greatly appreciated!!

PROGNOSIS NOT LOOKING GOOD

Erin and Jodi at Cape Ann Wildlife are treating this sweetest juvenile Red-shouldered Hawk for rat poison. The young hawk is yet another patient in their long list of wild creatures that have been poisoned this year by rodenticide. The prognosis is not looking good for this little guy.

All photos of the sickly juvenile Red-shouldered Hawk courtesy Cape Ann Wildlife

The adult Red-shouldered Hawk is a medium sized hawk. They are mostly forest dwellers. I’ve only see one once and it was stunning in flight.

Juvenile Red-shouldered Hawk – Image courtesy wiki commons media

BREAKING: A NEW COMPANION FOR MR. SWAN (HOPEFULLY!)

Cape Ann’s wildlife rehabilitation expert Jodi Swenson released a Mute Swan fledgling Saturday at Niles Pond. Jodi worked with Eastern Point resident Lyn Fonzo, where they set the young swan free from Lyn’s beach access to the pond’s edge. Lyn reports that the fledgling immediately headed to the reeds. Niles Pond is dense in vegetation, most notably at this time of year, and almost immediately, it was difficult to see her hiding, although easy to hear, as she moved through the phragmites and cattails.

Jodi, from Cape Ann Wildlife, shares that the Mute Swan baby has been in her care for several months. The cygnet came from Tufts and she/he appears to be about four months. Jodi raised the swan purposefully with minimal human contact so that the animal would remain wild. The now fledgling is very, very shy of humans, so please be respectful while the swan is becoming acclimated to her new environment. Cape Ann’s Mr. Swan is at least 27 years old and it is everyone’s greatest hope that he will “adopt” the new one, perhaps guiding her to maturity.

The above photo, although out of focus, is included here to show that the young one is foraging for food on her own. Look closely and you can see the pond vegetation dangling from her mouth. This is a great sign, that she can feed herself!!

Please visit Jodi’s website, Cape Ann Wildlife, Inc. I am sure we can all imagine how costly and time consuming it is to rehabilitate orphaned and injured wildlife. If so inclined, please think about making a tax deductible donation. Our deepest thanks and appreciation to Jodi for all the care and love she gives to Cape Ann’s most vulnerable animals. Until recently, Jodi was Cape Ann’s only wildlife rehabilitator. Jodi would like to give a shout out to Erinn Whitmore, who has been working with Jodi for many years, and who recently earned her state wildlife rehabilitator’s license. Erinn has founded GROWL: Gloucester Rehabilitation of Orphaned Wild Life, and will be specializing in caring for small mammals.

INJURED PIPING PLOVER UPDATE #2

4:20pm Update:
Catherine, George, and Charles drove our littlest chick to the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts. Thanks to Jodi, they were prepared and waiting for him. Little chick was assigned a case number and we were told to call after 3pm. As I am writing this report, Avery from the school just returned my phone call. She sounds terrific and was very helpful in explaining little chick’s injury and care. He has a traumatic brain injury, most likely caused by being stepped on. Little chick is being given supportive care, which includes pain medication, an anti-inflammatory, and fluids. He is also in an oxygen cage that allows him to breathe more easily. The vets are guarded in their prognosis as recovery from head trauma is very unpredictable.

Very sadly, I have to report that dogs were running around the beach unleashed at the time of the injury. No one witnessed exactly what happened, but last year I saw a dog running over and instantly killing a chick, despite my very best efforts to get the owner to control his dog. This morning at 6am dogs were on the beach leashed, but the owner was obliviously walking her two dogs through the sanctuary area precisely where the chicks were darting about. Leashed or unleashed, irresponsible dog owners are one of the chick’s greatest threats. Please, please folks tell your friends and neighbors about the Plovers and why it is so important to follow the dog ordinances. It seems as though late in the day, after 5 and before sunset, the chicks are the most vulnerable. Perhaps folks think its okay to bring dogs to the beach after the life guards leave. Early evening is exactly the same time of day that the chick was killed last year.

Our two Good Harbor Beach siblings, this morning at fourteen days old.
Earlier this morning updates:
Catherine writes, “I called Kim who met me right away at the beach. Soon After 9pm Jodi was there getting the bird. Jodi implemented  ER incubator and hydration methods. By 11pm chick pooped which may be sign that he was reacting to rehydration. (She explained that body shuts down digestion quickly to protect brain and heart. Pooping could be things working.) One eye swollen may equal head injury or seizure. All was speculation and she hoped chick would make it through night.”
Volunteer Nancy, who found the chick wrote, “My daughter spotted the chick on the soft sand lying just off the wet sand of the creek bed near where we were this morning. My son in law carried the chick from creek bed to large enclosure. I held chick while giving it water and tried to keep it warm, then put it in the covered part of the enclosure on advice of Audubon woman, hoping its mom would be able to give care. We called every emergency number we could find but no one picked up. Thank you so much for responding as you did.”
Today at 6:15am–dog walking through the Plover’s sanctuary–leashed or unleashed, dogs (as well as people) unintentionally step on Plovers. Please be careful.

GloucesterCast 9/22/13 With Guests Paulie Walnuts, Ed Collard, Toby Pett and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

GloucesterCast September22, 2013 With Paulie Walnuts, Ed Collard, Toby Pett and Host Joey Ciaramitaro

Topics include:

Paulie Walnuts refuses to tape a Walnuts Cam segment, Not A Fan of The GoPro, Robert Heidt Resigns From The Chamber, Lost Tortoise Bubba Goddard From Thatcher Road In Rockport, Jodi Swenson from Cape Ann Wildlife, iPhone 5c and 5s, cell phone decisions, cheap phone chargers and apple new os update, Olive Kitteredge and Wicked Tuna impact on local economy,Paul Frontiero Sr Art Exhibit