Fishing Schooner Columbia launch 1923 then and now

Columbia was designed by Starling Burgess. Shown here under construction at the Essex boat yard (Arthur Dana Story ship yard), launched, and sailing to Gloucester 1923. Leslie Jones photographs, from glass negatives Boston Public Library collection. It sank in 1946.

columbia at Essex boat yard

The new Columbia is participating in the Gloucester Schooner Festival 2018 – download the fantastic program here- handy information about each boat and all the special events

2018

2018 Gloucester Schooner Festival Parade of Sails – Columbia 

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Parade of Sails Schooner Columbia rebuilt 2014 returns for Schooner Festival 2018_low tide ©c ryan.jpg

Taking care of seniors: 136 Eastern Ave. “Fishermen’s Home” 1911 gift of John Hays Hammond, Sr.; and 110 Prospect St. purchased by Gloucester, Mass., in 1887

House History then and now for two former ‘old age homes’:

136 Eastern Avenue (Rt 127) 1911 and today- was a retirement home for fishermen

 

 

1911, Gloucester, Mass. “WILL OPEN ON CHRISTMAS DAY Several Old Sea Toilers Will Eat Christmas Dinner There Monday: Everything is in readiness for the opening of the Fishermen’s Home, formerly the Colby House, on Eastern avenue, and on Christmas day, a gathering of aged and disabled fishermen who have toiled their best days on the banks, but are no longer able to follow this hazardous occupation, will spend one of the happiest days of their lives and eat their first dinner in the new home…It would be a rather difficult undertaking to find a happier man today than Judge York. Two years ago after a conference with Dr. John Dixwell of Boston, who becoming interested in the work raised a fund among his friends for the relief of this class of men, who without friends or home were obliged to seek shelter in the house of coreection. Judge York went to Ipswich and secured the release of eight old fishermen, who were brought to this city and cared for at boarding houses during the winter months. Last winter the work was continued through the efforts of Dr. Dixwell and Judge York, and lately, their efforts were further crowned by the splendid gift of Mr. Hammond, who presented the home. The seven men who will become inmates of the home on Christmas Day are John Ryan, Joseph Alcott, John Nichools, Harris Atwood, James Halley, Robert Fraser and Henry Gormley.” article in the Gloucester Daily Times

The prior year “J. Hammond deeded lots for indigent fishermen at Beechbrook Cemetery.”- 1910 Gloucester Archives 

After writing about his friendship with Captain Blackburn, “one of the most undaunted sailors America has ever had…I was proud to be one of the honorary pallbearers at his funeral…” John Hammond Sr. concluded his autobiography with more about Gloucester:

“I look back with the greatest pleasure on the hours I have spent with other old Gloucester fishermen. In the winter of 1910 several of these old fellow appeared before the district court and pleaded guilty to vagrancy. Without other means of gaining food or shelter, they were seeking some sort of sustenance  in the poorhouse for the winter. In Washington, I read about this in the papers and got in touch with Judge York, Dr. Dickswell, Fred Shackelford, and others who were interested. We established a home to provide for these old fishermen. I learned to appreciate the fine traits of these men who were given refuge there. Often it was exceedingly difficult to persuade them that they were too old to stand the hardships of deep-sea fishing. Their truck garden faced the sea, and from there they could watch with their telescopes for the fishing vessels as they left and entered the harbor.  Sailors, like miners, are notoriously spendthrifts and these of Gloucester were no exception. They would arrive at the Home in a destitute condition. Because they no longer went to sea, and there was no chance of their reaching the traditional sailors’ grave, they had a great dread of potter’s field. For that reason I provided a cemetery where all could be assured of decent burial. Above the gate is inscribed:

And here rest, brave toiler of the sea,
sleep undistrubed,
God’s peace be with thee. 

Many of the inmates were choosey about the location of their graves. There were two in particular, bunkies since boyhood, who quarreled daily and, I fear, nightly, but who exacted from me a promise that they might be buried side by side.”

 

110 Prospect Street ca 1900 and today – was a former retirement home for senior women

 

Huntress Home 110 Prospect Street Gloucester Mass photo credit Ben and Sally D'Antonio for PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF GLOUCESTER VOLUME 3

 

 

Gloucester bought 110 Prospect Street in 1887 for $12,000 to establish the “Huntress Home for Old Ladies of Native Birth.” I’ll write more about this one later.

Here’s how both senior housing options were described in the 1913 Gloucester Directory (from Gloucester Archives):

Gloucester archives_Gloucester Directory 1913 charity

See amazing 1901 historic photos from Bruce Roberts: Gloucester crews worked on Haskell’s dam

City of Gloucester officials are working towards a Phase 3 for the Haskell Pond Dam reconstruction which I wrote about last week (Part 1). I included information about the original monumental build. In response, Bruce Roberts was kind enough to share these amazing photographs of the impressive crews at the Haskell Pond construction site 1901. Bonus: they were annotated by his grandfather in 1958.  West Gloucester families may recognize a surname or two, maybe a family resemblance. Please help ID if you can.

Bruce Roberts explains: “My grandfather, Edward F. Roberts, identified the individuals back in 1958.  There are some folks he didn’t recognize, since he would have been pretty young when these images were taken.  The first picture has the most identified individuals. One thing that has always been remarkable to me in the second image is how much Chester Andrews, my g-grandfather, resembled my father, Eugene Roberts, at that age.”

 HASKELL’S POND CONSTRUCTION ca.1901-02 – (Individuals ID’d by Edward Roberts in 1958)

Clearing Haskells pond late 1901 © courtesy historic photo collection Bruce Roberts

Photo 1, Dec 1901 (in snow): “Wood Choppers at Haskell’s Pond, December 1901”
Front Row, L-R: 1. Otis Lufkin, 2. Matt Poland, 3. Loren (sp?) Harris, 4. Melvin Wilkins, 5. Jim White

Back Row: 1.Asa Sargent, 2. unknown, 3. Ed Lufkin, 4. James Chadbourne, 5. Joseph Abbott, 6. unknown, 7. Joshua Roberts, 8 & 9. unknown

Clearing Haskells pond late 1901 © courtesy historic photo from collection Bruce Roberts

Photo 2 (late 1901 or early 1902):

Front, L-R: 1. Loren Harris, 2 & 3. unknown, 4. Asa Sargent

Center, w/ white shirt: Eps Walter Haskell

3rd row: (Right side, behind Asa Sargent, in light coat): Chester Andrews

(2nd to left from Chester Andrews): Fred Jeffs

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (4)

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Continue reading “See amazing 1901 historic photos from Bruce Roberts: Gloucester crews worked on Haskell’s dam”

Niles Beach and Gate Lodge, Gloucester Massachusetts then and now

circa 1900 vs 2018

gate lodge and niles beach ca.1890

Moving ivy –

ivy clad Gate Lodge built 1888, photograph ca.1900  Vs. ivy clad stone marker and grounds today

approaching Niles Beach former Gate Lodge on right ©c ryan_20180630_072943.jpg

 

niles beach ca 1890

glacial rock boulders and coast line Niles Beach Gloucester MA ©c ryan _20180630_120331

 

 

 

1973 Greasy Pole Walker Fiesta photo challenge

“4th of July greased pole walk over water Glouceter, MA 1973” by Spencer Grant

Can anyone identify the Greasy pole walker, boat leaper, and little boy in the cool inflatable (50 something years old now)? Are you in this photograph on the platform or watching from the water?

4th of july greased pole walk over water glouceter ma by 1973 by Spencer Grant
1973 ©Spencer Grant

click on thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

The 93rd Annisquam Sea Fair, 1939 From Fred Bodin

Fred Bodin Submits-

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When these photos were taken on August 15th, 1939, the Village of Annisquam was having it’s 93rd annual Sea Fair. Established in 1846, this fair was held during the Civil War at a youthful 15 years old, over the brief Spanish American War in 1898 it was approaching age 50, during the "War to End All Wars" (WW I) it had existed for 70 years, and  the Sea Fair was nearly 100 years old for WW II. This Saturday, July 28th, Gloucester’s Annisquam Village will host it’s 166th Sea Fair. Go there if you can.

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You can read about the Fair on Good Morning Gloucester, and I can tell you that it’s a down home, grass roots, pure New England Yankee event. It’s all about family, community, church, neighborhood, and especially tradition.

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The Annisquam Sea Fair runs from 10am until 3pm. Dinner on the Annisquam Bridge (shown above in 1890) is served from 5pm to 7pm. Do make a reservation.

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This charming woman is selling post card prints for Gloucester photographer Alice M. Curtis (1871 – 1971), whose life’s work I bought in the form of her negatives. Some people seeing this GMG post will recognize their great grandparents, grandparents, parents, and perhaps even themselves as children. I’m hoping to see some interesting comments and recollections.

Fred