Massachusetts Museum Guide: upcoming art exhibits at 150 institutions

installation view at ICA The Water Shed_JOHN AKOMFRAH PURPLE_2019_© photograph catherine ryan (5).jpg

Last Chance! These must see 2019 shows are closing soon: Don’t miss ICA Watershed Purple (installation view above) closing September 2;  DeCordova New England Biennial and the Provincetown Art Association & Museum’s 1945 Chaim Gross exhibition close September 15; and catch Renoir at the Clark before it’s gone September 22nd.

A few of the listed upcoming exhibitions to note: the NEW building and exhibits at PEM are opening September 2019; Homer at the Beach is on display at Cape Ann Museum thru December 1 (and catch a Richard Ormond lecture on John Singer Sargent’s Charcoals Sept.28 at Cape Ann Museum (ahead of the Morgan exhibition opening October);  three new shows opening at MFA; Gordon Parks at Addison; and Alma Thomas at Smith. A Seuss-focused experience was pronounced destined for Boston, ahead of its TBD venue, by the LA entertainment company co-founders. Some shows I’ve already visited and may write about, mostly from a dealer’s perspective as that is my background. Exhibition trends continue to evolve and reveal new directions. A few patterns I see in the exhibition titles: what’s annointed for display and how it’s contextualized (corrective labels); immersive exhibits; revisiting colonial methodologies and themes; major solo surveys; women artists (and this upcoming season boost underscoring womens’ suffrage and 100th anniversary of the ratification of women’s right to vote); illustration; environment; and issues of humanity and migration. The list is illustrated with images of the sites. All photographs mine unless otherwise noted. Right click or hover to see info; click to enlarge. – Catherine Ryan

The guide – Massachusetts Museum Guide, Fall 2019

Note from author: The list below is alphabetized by town, and details upcoming exhibitions at each venue as well as some that are closing soon. Click the word “website” (color gray on most monitors) for hyperlinks that redirect to venues. For a list alphabetically sorted by venue, see my Google Map (with a Candy Trail overlay) “Art Museums in Massachusetts” here and embedded at the end of this post. I pulled the map together several years ago. No apps to download or website jumping. Easy scroll down so you don’t miss an exhibit that’s closer than you think to one that you may already be exploring. A few are open seasonally (summer) or weekends only–call first to check before visiting. Major new architectural building projects are underway at BU (closed) and MIT. The 54th Regiment Memorial on Boston Common will undergo restoration. Get ready for close observation of conservation in process.  – Catherine

AMESBURY

1. John Greenleaf Whittier historic Home and Museum website 

AMHERST 

2. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art website

  • September 7, 2019- March 1, 2020 Under the Sea with Eric Carle
  • Through October 27, 2019 The Picture Book Odysseys of Peter Sis video of exhibition
  • November 10, 2019 – April 5, 2020 The Pursuit of Everything: Maria Kalman’s Books for Children
  • Through December 1, 2019 William Steig’s Sylvester and the Magic Pebble: A Golden Anniversary

3. Emily Dickinson Museum website ongoing special guided tours through two historic house museums- Homestead and Evergreens, and programs

4. Eli Marsh Gallery – Amherst College website

  • September 16-October 11, 2019 Do Things to Images: An Exhibition by Odette England

5. Mead Art Museum –  Amherst College website

  • Opening September 12, 2019 Rotherwas Project 5 | Christopher Myers: The Red Plague Rid You for Learning Me Your Language
  • Through September 11, 2019 Fleeting Nature: Selections from Collection
  • Fall 2019 Ten Years of Trinkett Clark Memorial Student Acquisitions
  • Opening December 2019 Students’ museum seminar exhibition
  • Through January 5, 2020 Constructing Collage

ANDOVER

6. Addison Gallery of American Art Philips Andover website

  • September 1, 2018- July 31, 2020 A Wildness Distant from Ourselves: Art and Ecology in 19th-Century America press release
  • September 1, 2018 – December 15, 2019 The Art of Ambition in the Colonial Northeast press release
  • September 1 – November 15, 2019 George Washington: American Icon press release
  • October 5, 2019 – January 5 2020 Men of Steel, Women of Wonder press release
  • February 1 – April 26, 2020 Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940-1950 press release

ARLINGTON

7. Cyrus E. Dallin (1861-1944) Art Museum website

ATTELBORO

8. Attleboro Arts Museum (like NSAA) website

BELMONT

9. The Belmont Woman’s Club & 1853 Winslow Homer (seasonal) website historic house museum

BEVERLY

10. Montserrat College of Art website

  • Through September 13, 2019 Montserrat Gallery | Julian Howley: Building Better Mobs
  • Through September 21, 2019 Ashley Brown Durand: It’s Ok to Feel Things
  • Through October 12, 2019 301 Gallery | Adrian Fernandez Milanes

11. Murals, Cabot Street Beverly

 

12. Beverly Public Library website

 

13. Long Hill historic home and gardens 114 acres website 

BOSTON

14. Boston Athenaeum website

  • September 17, 2019 – March 14, 2020 Required Reading: Reimagining a Colonial Library on display in the Norma Jean Calderwood Gallery press release

15. Boston Black Heritage Trail, NPS website

photo info: Visitors will see the Robert Gould Shaw 54th Regiment Memorial undergoing conservation beginning fall 2019

16. Boston Children’s Museum website

Boston Children's Museum_20190828_Hood icon © c ryan

  • Through September 30th HUMAN GARDEN | Handmade Installation by Lani Asuncion on display in The Gallery
  • Through Fall 2019 Pickup Music Project www.pickupmusicproject.com
  • iconic permanent public art/architecture, i.e. Hood Milk Carton; mini temporary displays and/or art commissions integrated every floor

17. Boston Freedom Trail website

18. Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park website

(photos show info gateway on the Greenway near the ferry access to Boston Harbor Islands)

  • Summer 2019 public art: Boston Harbor [Re]creation The Project: Artists Marsha Parrilla; Robin MacDonald-Foley; Brian Sonia-Wallace more(Jury: Luis Cotto MCC; Lucas Cowan, The Greenway; Celena illuzzi, National Parks; Caroly Lewenberg; Denise Sarno-Bucca DCR; Courtney Shape, City of Boston; Rebecca Smerling Boston Harbor Now; Kera Washingon; Cynthia Woo, Pao Arts Center)

19. Boston Public Library website

  • Through November 10, 2019 America Transformed: Mapping the 19th Century, special exhibitions, more

20. Boston Society of Architects website

  • Through October 25, 2019 Canstruction 2019
  • Through December 31, 2019 2019 BSA Design Awards 
  • December 6 – January 2, 2019 8th Annual Gingerbread House Design Competition
  • January 10, 2020- May 15, 2020 The Architecture of Time
  • February 14 – April 5, 2020 Women in Design Award of Excellence 20th Anniversary celebratin and exhibition
  • February 21 – May 31, 2020 Durable: Sustainable Material Ecologies Vilna Shul website

21. Boston University BU Art Galleries website

  • Reopening Fall 2020 – 808 Gallery (temporary closures)
  • Reopening Fall 2020 – Faye G., Jo & James Stone Gallery (temporary closures)
  • Annex

22. Design Museum, Boston website

23. Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway website 

Super A_ Stefan Thelen_Resonance_2019_Greenway mural Boston Massachusetts© photograph c ryan.jpg

  • Unveiled 2019 – Super A (Stefan Thelen) Resonance, 2019, latex and spray paint
    • Note to Greenway (see photo notes below): food trucks by the stop should be relocated to other food truck areas (and maybe one tree) to optimize and welcome sight line to the Greenway and public spaces from streets, sidewalk, and South Station. There are pauses elsewhere along the lattice park links, and a generous approach past the wine bar. The temporary commissioned mural could extend verso (or invite a second artist) so that the approach from Zakim Bridge/RT1/93North is as exciting as the approach from Cape Cod.
  • Skip the app AI download– swamped my phone battery despite free WiFi on the Greenway.
  • See complete list of 2019 public art currently on view at The Greenway here
  • The Greenway packs a lot of punch in a compressed area; its lattice of dynamic public spaces and quiet passages are an easy stroll into the North End or along the HarborWalk to the ICA, roughly similar in size and feel as walking Battery Park and Hudson River Park in New York City.
college students from Boston University volunteer grounds keeping before the semester kicks off_ at The Greenway_Boston Mass_20190828_©c ryan.jpg
photo credit: Grounds help | College students from Boston University volunteering before the semester kicks off at The Greenway, Boston MA © c ryan _20190828_
ICA needs to be on these wayfinding guides.jpg
p.s. Need to add ICA to The Greenway wayfinding 

24. Innovation and Design building (aka Boston Design Building makeover in process in winter 2016 photos posted here) website

25. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum website

  • Through September 15, 2019 BIG PLANS: Picturing Social Reform more
  • Through October 20, 2019 Contemporary Art  Joan Jonas: i know why they left more
  • Through January 14, 2020 Anne H. Fitzpatrick Facade Laura Owens: Untitled 
  • October 17, 2019 – January 20, 2020 In the Company of Artists featuring Sophie Calle, Bharti Kher, Luisa Lambri, Laura Owens, Rachel Perry, Dayanita Singh, and Su-Mei Tse

26. Guild of Boston Artists website

  • Through September 28, 2019 Annual Regional Juried Exhibition 2019 Winners announced September 21, 2019. The 2018 gold winner, Leon Doucette of Gloucester, exhibiting again, and Melissa Cooper. more

27. ICA Institute of Contemporary Art website

ICA BOSTON_silvery day_©c ryan.jpg

  • On display at The Water Shed ICA Boston venue

installation view at ICA The Water Shed_JOHN AKOMFRAH PURPLE_2019_© photograph catherine ryan (7)

  • Through September 2, 2019 at The Water Shed, ICA Boston John Akomfrah: Purple more 
  • What’s coming in 2020 to The Water Shed? Still TBA
  • Through September 22, 2019 ICA Less Is a Bore: Maximilist Art & Design more

Nice installation with a few surprises and thoughtful connection to other exhibtions on view. (The LeWit and Johns selections triggered what about that work or artist? I wish May Stevens and Harmony Hammond were included and my list grew from there. That’s part of the fun of the exhibit.)

ICA installation view_Less is More 2019 © photo copyright Catherine Ryan

  • September 24 – February 7, 2021 ICA Yayoi Kusama: Love is Calling more
  • September 24 – February 7, 2021 ICA Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama more
  • October 23, 2019 – January 26, 2020 ICA When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art more
  • Through December 31, 2019 ICA 2019 James and Audrey Foster Prize Boston area artists: Rashin Fahandej; Josephine Halvorson; Lavaughan Jenkins; Helga Roht Poznanski more 
  • Through December 31, 2019 ICA Vivian Suter more 
  • January 17, 2020 – March 15, 2020 ICA Fineberg Art Wall | Nina Chanel Abney mural more

ICA Boston installation view_Fineberg Art Wall_ artist Nina Chanel Abney _ 2019 © photograph copyright Catherine Ryan.jpg

  • January 20, 2020 – July 5, 2020 ICA Tschabalala Self: Around the Way more
  • January 20, 2020 – July 5, 2020 ICA Carolina Caycedo more
  • February 26 – May 17, 2020 ICA Sterling Ruby more
  • July 1, 2020 – October 18, 2020 ICA Virgil Abloh: Figures of Speech more

28. John F. Kennedy JFK Presidential Library & Museum, UMASS Boston website

  • Through November 28, 2019 JFK 100: Milestones & Mementos  more
  • Through December 31, 2019 Freedom 7 Space Capsule more

29. Massachusetts State House art collection website  and Boston Commons public arts and spaces

30. McMullen Museum of Art BC – Boston College website

  • September 9, 2019 William Trost Richards: Hieroglyphs of Landscape more
  • September 9, 2019 Simon Dinnerstein: “The Fulbright Triptych” more
  • September 9, 2019 Alen MacWeeney and a Century of New York Street Photography more 
  • September 9, 2019 Mary Armstrong: Conditions of Faith more

31. MAAH – Museum of African American History, Boston website

32. MFA – Museum of Fine Arts, Boston website 

Museum of Fine Arts Boston_20170113_Manship sculptures © c ryan.jpg

  • September 13, 2019 – May 3, 2021 Women Take the Floor (The fugitive textiles and printmaking sections will rotate out Part 1 May 2020) at the MFA more 
  • October 12, 2019 – August 9, 2020 Weng Family Collection of Chinese Painting: Family and Friends at the MFA more
  • October 13, 2019 – January 20, 2020 Ancient Nubia Now at the MFA more 

installation at MFA underway _20190820_readying for Ancient Nubia ©c ryan.jpg

  • Through October 14, 2019 Community Arts Mindful Mandlas at the MFA
  • Through December 15, 2019 Viewpoints: Photographs from art dealer Howard Greenberg Collection at the MFA more 

big league photo art dealer Howard Greenberg stellar vintage photography collection.jpg

  • Through January 20, 2020 Make Believe: Five Contemporary photographers at the MFA more
  • Through January 20, 2020 Kay Nielsen’s Enchanted Vision at the MFA more
  • Through February 20, 2020 Hyman Bloom: Matters of Life and Death at the MFA more
  • Through February 23, 2020  Jackson Pollock |  Katharina Grosse Abstraction on a Massive Scale at the MFA more

POLLOCK at MFA orginially commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim.jpg

  • March 1, 2020  – May 25, 2010 Lucian Freud: The Self Portraits at the MFA more 
  • Through March 8, 2020 Collecting Stories: Mid Century Experiment at the MFA
  • Through March 29, 2020 Boston Made Arts and Crafts Jewelry and Metalwork at the MFA more
  • Through June 30, 2020 Conservation in Action: Japanes Buddhist Sculpure at the MFA

33. Otis House Museum, Historic New England website historic house museum

34. Paul Revere House website

35. Society of Arts & Crafts, at Pier 4 Boston website 

  • Sepember 10 2019 – November 10, 2019 Kogei-Kyoto x SA+C, Boston more
  • save the date: Society visits Gloucester, Mass

36. USS Constitution, NPS website

BREWSTER 

37. Cape Cod Museum of Natural History website

  • Long term display in the Naturescape Gallery James Prosek and Barbara Harmon (see also Thornton Burgess in East Sandwich) 

BROCKTON

38. Fuller Craft Museum heads into 51st season website

  • Opens September 7, 2019 Striking Gold: Fuller at Fifty press release 
  • Opens September 7, 2019 Gleam: Golden Selections from the Permanent Collection press release
  • Through September 8, 2019 Mano-Made: New Expression in Craft by Latino Artists
  • Opens September 28, 2019 Human Impact: Stories of the Opiod Epidemic
  • Through October 6, 2019 Brockton Youth Creates
  • Opens October 19, 2019 Stitch by Stitch: Activist Quilts from the Social Justice Sewing Academy
  • Through October 27, 2019 Take It Outside: Works from the Boston Sculptors Gallery
  • Through October 27, 2019 Maine Crafts Association: Ten Years of Master Craft Artistshttps://larzanderson.org/exhibits/goldenage/
  • Through November 17, 2019 Elizabeth Potenza: “Look up,” she said, “there is more color than you ever imagined.
  • Opens January 25, 2020 Stephanie Cole: Secular Cathedral
  • Opens May 2, 2020 Another Crossing: Artists Revisit the Mayflower Voyage
  • Through May 3, 2020 Tending the Fires: Recent Acquisitions in Clay

BROOKLINE

39. Larz Anderson Auto Museum website

  • Through mid April 2020 Golden Age – Era of Distinction, Style and Grace 1915-1948 more
  • Permanent display – The Anderson Collection 

CANTON

40. Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate  website

41. Museum of American Bird Art at Mass Audubon website

  • Through September 15, 2019 Under Pressure– Birds in the Printed Landscape: Linocuts by Sherrie York more
  • Through September 29, 2019 The Shorebird Decoys of Gardner & Dexter more

CAMBRIDGE

Harvard – 

42.  Harvard Art Museums (Fogg; Busch-Reisinger; and Arthur M. Sackler) website

Why do any of the Harvard museums charge an entrance fee?

  • Through January 5, 2020 Winslow Homer: Eyewitness (in conjunction with Cape Ann Museum Homer exhibition) University Research Gallery
  • Through January 5, 2020 Early Christian Africa: Arts of Transformation
  • Through January 5, 2020 Critical Printing
  • Through January 5, 2020 Crossing Lines, Constructing Home: Displacement and Belonging in Contemporary Art
  • Through November 14, 2021 On Site Clay — Modeling African Design

43. Harvard – Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts website

  • Through September 29, 2019 Anna Oppermann: Drawings

Harvard Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts closed for event_20190705_©c ryan.jpg

The Carpenter Center was closed for an event on the day I scheduled to see the Oppermann exhibition – good reminder to call first for the must see shows on your list.

  •  Jonathan Berger: An Introduction to Nameless Love
  • Harvard Film Archive weekly film series

44. Harvard – ‘The Cooper Gallery’ / The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African and African American Art website

The Cooper Gallery Harvard University_20190705_Boston MA_ ©c ryan.jpg

  • September 16 – December 13, 2019 The Sound of My Soul: Frank Stewart’s Life in Jazz photography, curated by Ruth Fine
  • the Gordon Park exhibition that recently closed was on my list of top shows for 2019

45. Harvard – Gutman Gallery website

  • Through August 30, 2019 Sneha Shrestha (aka Imagine), Ed.M.’17

46. Harvard –  Graduate School of Design Gund Hall Exhibition website

47. Harvard – Ernst Mayr Library website

48. Harvard – Houghton Library website

49. Harvard – Lamont Library (Harvard ID required) website

  • Through March 29, 2020 Harvard College International Photo Contest Winners

50. Harvard –  Museum of Natural History website

  • September 25, 2019 – December 31, 2019 Rotten Apples: Botanical Models of Diversity and Disease at Harvard Museum of Natural History more
  • Ongoing, Glass Flowers Gallery

51. Harvard – Peabody Museum of Archaeology website

  • Through December 31, 2019 Harvard’s Peabody Museum and the Invention of American Anthropology more

52. Harvard- Pusey Library Exhibition Gallery website

  • Through October 31, 2019 Mapping the Moon in Black and White Harvard Map Collection
  • Through January 22, 2020 The Rittase Touch: Photographic Views of Harvard in the 1930s

53. Harvard – Widener Library (Harvard ID required) website

  • Though September 30, 2019 Colonial North America: Portals to the Past

54. Central Square Murals, Cambridge website

MIT –

55. MIT Museum website  **OCTOBER 2021 MIT Museum moving to KENDALL SQUARE**

  • Through September 1, 2019 Arresting Fragments: Object Photography at the Bauhaus  more
  • Opens October 11, 2019 The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology more 
  • Opens November 7, 2019 Making Digital Tangible more
  • Through May 1, 2021 Lighter, Stronger, Faster: The Herreshoff Legacy design and engineering and the Hereshoff Manufacturing Co. more
  • Ongoing Harold Edgerton exhibit; Holography collection; and Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson

56. MIT List Visual Arts Center website MIT Media Lab more

  • Through September 15, 2019 Student Lending Art program more
  • Through October 20, 2019 List Projects: Farah Al Qasimi more
  • October 18, 2019 – January 5, 2020 Alicja Kwade: In Between Glances more
  • December 12, 2019 – February 9, 2020 List Projects: Becca Albee more
  • February 7, 2020 – April 12, 2020 Christine Sun Kim: Off the Charts more
  • February 7, 2020 – April 12, 2020 Colored People Time: Mundane Futures, Quotidian Pasts, Banal Presents more
  • March 17, 2020 – May 17, 2020 List Projects: Rami George more

57. MIT Hart Nautical Gallery website

58. MIT Museum Studio and Compton Gallery student projects website

59. MIT School of Architecture Galleries website

  • September 1 Gallery 9 SA+P Thesis show website
  • School of Architecture Dean’s Gallery website
  • School of Architecture Keller Gallery website
  • Rotch Library Exhibition space website
  • Through September 30 GRAND CANYON: Geology, Exploration Tourism and Architecture more 
  • Through October 4, 2019 A theater without theater on display Maihaugen Gallery and Rotch Library more
  • Opens December 9, 2019 ACT Fall Studio Final exhibit
  • PLAZmA Digital Gallery website

60. MIT Wiesner Student Art Gallery website Stratton Student Center

  • Through September 15, 2019 Surrounded by Digitized Faces and Bodies 

61. Mount Auburn Cemetery website 

62. Museum of Science, Boston website

Museum of Science_20170530_George Rhodes 1987 commission, Archimedean Excogitation, mesmerizing audiokinetic sculpture ©c ryan.jpg

  • Temporary art and photography exhibitions top floor moments of excellence
  • Ongoing George Rhodes 1987 commission, Archimedean Excogitation, mesmerizing audiokinetic sculpture (Relocated to lobby 2015- I prefered lower level.)
  • Ongoing Katherine Lane Weems (1899-1989) animal sculptures. MoS is the largest repository of her work.
  • Historic Eames installation dismantled 😦

CLINTON

63. Museum of Russian Icons website

  • Through October 20, 2019 Wrestling With Angels Icons from the Prosopon School of Iconology and Iconography more
  • November 15, 2019 – March 8, 2020 Emil Hoppe: Photographs from the Ballet Russes more

CONCORD

64. Louisa May Alcott Orchard House 399 Lexington Road, Concord, Massachusetts 01742, United States (978) 369-4118 guided tours year round plus special events

65. Ralph Waldo Emerson House (seasonal) website

66. Walden Pond State Reservation – Henry David Thoreau website

67. Concord Museum website

  • Opening October 19, 2019 Concord Collects 
  • February 14, 2020 Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere press release

COTUIT

68. Cahoon Museum of American Art website

  • September 6 – October 30, 2019 Through the Looking Glass: Daguerreotype Masterworks from the Dawn of Photography
  • October 6 – October 30, 2019 Cahoon Contemporaries: Jodi Colella, Jackie Reeves, Kimberly Sheering
  • November 8 – December 22, 2019 Soo Sunny Park: Boundary Conditions installation
  • November 8 – December 22, 2019 Gretchen Romey Tanzer Weaver
  • Rotating – Highlights from the collection; New Acquisitions; Cahoon studio tours; and historical installation designed by Mary Ann Agresti  

DALTON

69. Crane Museum of Papermaking website Founded in 1930. Mill venue dates to 1844, built after papermaker Zenas Crane’s retirement

DENNIS 

70. Cape Cod Museum of Art – 39th year website

  • Through October 6, 2019 Milton Teichman sculpture
  • Through October 20, 2019 Ship of State…Paintings by Robert Henry
  • Through December 21, 2019 Interpreting Their World: Varujan Boghosian, Carmen Cicero, Elspeth Halvorsen and Pual Resika

DUXBURY 

71. The Art Complex Museum (Weyerhaeuser collection) website

  • August 18 – November 10, 2019 Steve Novick: Approximation 
  • September 15 -January 12, 2020 Draw the Line
  • September 15 – January 12, 2020 Rotations: Highlights From the Permanent Collection Nocturne including Lowell Birge Harrison (American, 1854–1929), Suzanne Hodes (American, b. 1939), Kawase Hasui (Japanese, 1883–1957), George Inness (American, 1825–1894), Johan Barthold Jongkind (Dutch, 1819–1891) Martin Lewis (American, 1881–1962), and Henri Eugene Le Sidaner (French, 1862-1939)
  • November 17 – February 16, 2020 George Herman Found Paintings

EAST SANDWICH

72. Thornton W. Burgess Society Green Briar Nature Center & Jam Kitchen website *may join Cape Cod Museum of Natural History in Brewster to combine and become the Cape Cod Museums of Natural History

ESSEX

73. Essex Shipbuilding Museum website

  • September 8th and 15th, 2019 Clam Basket Making Workshop
  • September 12-13th,2019  The Great Rowing Adventure, the first collaborative rowing program with Lowell’s Boat Shop and the Essex Shipbuilding Museum

74. TOHP Burnham Town Hall & Library, Essex website don’t miss Alexia Parker paper collage

TOHP Burnham town hall and library_20190416_©c ryan.jpg

FITCHBURG

75. Fitchburg Art Museum (FAM) website

  • Through September 1, 2019 84th Regional Exhibition of Art and Craft
  • Through September 1, 2019 Broad Strokes: American Painting of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries from the FAM collection
  • September 7, 2019 – January 5, 2020 Sage Sohier/David Hilliard: Our Parents, Ourselves more
  • September 21, 2019 – November 10, 2019 Adria Arch: Reframing Eleanor more
  • September 21, 2019 Daniela Rivera: Labored Landscapes (Where Hand Meets Ground) more 
  • September 21, 2019 – January 12, 2020 David Katz: Earth Wares more
  • Ongoing Evoking Eleanor; Discover Ancient Egypt; Thurston sculpture by Douglas Kornfeld

FRAMINGHAM

76. Danforth Museum of Art, Framingham State Univ.  website

  • September 7 – October 13, 2019 Populux Steven Duede | Sean Sullivan on display in the works on paper gallery
  • September 7 – December 30, 2019 Dressed! Exhibiting artists include Catherine Bertulli, Jodi Colella, Merill Comeau, Mia Cross, Nancy Grace Horton, and Marky Kauffmann
  • September 7 – May 2020 Highlights from the Permanent Collection

GLOUCESTER

Continue reading “Massachusetts Museum Guide: upcoming art exhibits at 150 institutions”

Art of Winslow Wilson & Pico Miran: Two Artists – One Life exhibit at the Rockport Art Association & Museum

1951 The Devil's Churn prize painting by Winslow Wilson AAA show_ad mentions studio in Carnegie Hall in NY and Bradford building in Glo
1951 notice indicates AAA show and artist’s studio in Carnegie Hall in NY and Bradford building in Gloucester, Mass.

The Art of Winslow Wilson & Pico Miran: Two Artists – One Life

June 8 – July 8, 2019

Rockport Art Association and Museum

12 Main Street, Rockport, MA

There are about forty Winslow Wilson (1892-1974) paintings in the exhibit and a new catalogue. I look foward to considering his work in person.

Back in February 2017, I wrote about Wilson/Miran in response to a GMG query from the artist’s granddaughter, Claudia Wilson-Howard, and her painstaking research and writing about his mysterious life and forgotten art, and filled in more context. Her excellent work is the genesis for the museum show and rediscovery of the artist. Wilson was a member and teacher at the Rockport Art Association. For local readers, Claudia’s online catalogue about his work  www.winslowwilson.com helpfully provides some Gloucester addresses associated with Wilson.

  • June 21, 1951: Bradford Building, 209 Main Room 208, Gloucester, MA
  • August 1, 1951: Marine Basin, E. Gloucester, MA
  • June 18, 1952: Bradford Building, 209 Main Room 208, Gloucester, MA
  • July 26, 1955: Bradford Building, 209 Main Room 208, Gloucester, MA
  • 1967 maybe 195 Main Street, Gloucester, MA
  • 1969 maybe 195 Main Street, Gloucester, MA
  • June 2, 1971: PO. Box 414, Gloucester, MA

I added these: 21 Est 15th Street, 154 East 39th Street, Carnegie Hall, 3 Washington Square North in Greenwich Village, Woodstock, N.Y., and Lime Rock, CT.

winslow wilson 1954.jpg
page from Gloucester’s annual “Cape Ann Festival for the Arts” 1954. Artist Margaret Fitzhugh Brown selected his work for her group.

Harvard magazine profile about Karen King by Lydialyle Gibson

Fantastic, thoughtful feature profile about Karen King, by Lydialyle Gibson in the current issue of Harvard Magazine, November-December 2018.

Early Christianity. The bits the Bible Left Out: Karen King. the Harvard University Hollis professor of divinity and a historian of early Christianity, studies texts from Christianity’s first centuries to reinterpret the history of the early church 

excerpts:

“…I think a history of Christianity, which is a kind of story, serves us better if it has all the loose ends, the complexities, the multiple voices, the difficulties, the things that don’t add up, the roads not taken—all of that,” she says. “We need complexity for the complexity of our lives.” 

“Karen’s book really shifted the discussion,” says Princeton religion scholar Elaine Pagels, Ph.D. ’70, LL.D. ’13, whose 1979 bestseller The Gnostic Gospels dislodged the idea of early Christianity as a unified movement and launched the conversation that What Is Gnosticism? later took up. “Karen’s book showed how those terms”—Gnosticism, heresy, orthodoxy—“were coined, how those concepts were shaped, and how late they came into scholarly discourse,” says Pagels. “It’s like clearing away the brush, so that people could look at these texts with a much more open mind.”

“As an undergraduate at the University of Montana in the early 1970s, King took a religious studies course from John Turner, one of the scholars working to edit and translate the Nag Hammadi texts. In class, she and other students read unpublished drafts of English translations that the wider public wouldn’t see for several years. It was electrifying. King had never imagined that there were early Christian writings beyond the Bible. “Why these texts and not those?” she wondered. And: “Who decided, and why?”

KAREN KING Harvard magazine   Nov-Dec 2018 issue_cover story profile by Lydialyle Gibson.jpg

www.harvardmagazine.com

 

Boston Cannons Lacrosse is a Must See

I was fortunate enough to spend another day at Endicott College photographing the Boston Cannons Major League Lacrosse game….this time against none other than the New York Lizards and their Paul Rabil. The Boston/New York rivalry exists on the lacrosse field as it does on the court, the rink, and in the end zones of other major league sports.  Both teams were phenomenal to watch and at many points during the game the score was tied.  After an unreal beginning to the 4th quarter, the Cannons were able to rally and finish the game up 15-13.

As with before, I was struck by not only the fast paced and action packed game, but also the incredibly fan-friendly environment.  Lacrosse is no joke and the speed, agility, and fierceness demonstrated on the field is in stark contrast to the friendly and engaging fan experience that takes place on the sidelines after the game.  Which simply adds to its appeal.

The two games at Endicott College were part of the Boston Cannons Cannons in Your Community initiative that’s goal was to bring Major League Lacrosse to both the North and South Shore areas.  The South Shore games took place in Hingham.

Endicott was a spectacular venue for a large sporting event and nothing would make me happier than hearing that the Cannons will be returning next summer.  That being said, I look forward to heading into Boston later this season to catch the action on their home field at Harvard Stadium.

The Cannons’ next home game is on Saturday, July 28th at 5:00 pm

Check out the Boston Cannons here

 

What a low blow: Justice Lowy clears contested Berkshire Museum art for auction

Justice Lowy’s JUDGEMENT was released April 5, 2018. The Museum may sell Shuffleton’s Barbershop, and — via Sotheby’s– the remaining 39 works free of any restrictions.

“The museum has satisfied its burden of establishing that is has become impossible or impracticable to administer the Museum strictly in accordance with its chartiable purpose, thus entitling the Museum to relief under the doctrine of equitable deviation. Accordingly the court allows the Museum’s request for equitable relief to sell the designated artwork.”

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Justice Lowy MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING

page 1 MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING Justice Lowy Berkshire Museum and AGO April 5 2018

Reaction from Sotheby’s Auction House:

“We are very pleased that the court approved the agreement reached between the Berkshire Museum and the Massachusetts Attorney General. We look forward to working with the museum to ensure a bright future for the people of Pittsfield and Western Massachusetts.” Judge Lowy’s decision came in just in time to meet the auction’s press deadline clearing for art sales this spring, else sales would have been pushed back till the fall at the earliest. The catalogue pages are ready from last fall’s prep.

Reaction from Elizabeth McGraw, President, Berkshire Museum Board of Trustees:

“This is great news for the people of Berkshire County and everyone who visits the Berkshire Museum for one-of-a-kind experiences in history, art, and science. We recognize this decision may not please those who have opposed the museum’s plans. Still, we hope people will be able to move forward in a constructive way to help us secure and strengthen the future of this museum, at a time when our community needs it more than ever. “

Reaction from Save the Art – Save the Museum (STA-STM)

“Save the Art-Save the Museum continues to oppose the sale of the Berkshire Museum’s art treasures and its unrestricted use of the resulting funds. We also regret the judge’s disregard of the public trust in which the museum held its collections. The impending sale will not only diminish Pittsfield as a city claiming to be of cultural import to Berkshire County, but will reverberate destructively for years through collections similarly held in trust throughout the state and country. As a group, we will make a more detailed statement after meeting in person to consider the loss to our community and its impact.”

Patiner flight into egypt featured in 1953 article celebrating Berkshire Museum 50th celebration
1953

Have a look back at an inspiring 1965 Berkshire Eagle profile about Berkshire Museum Director Stuart C. Henry, and an earlier feature from the Berkshire Evening Eagle, published Thursday, Aug. 20, 1953, heralding the Berkshire Museum’s 50th anniversary. Both convey the museum’s seamless blend of high art, science, community and education.

I wonder what happened to the marble swans over the Berkshire Museum elliptical pool designed by A. Sterling Calder, father of the sculptor, Alexander Calder, and resident of Richmond, Massachusetts, less than 20 minutes away from Pittsfield?  Continue reading “What a low blow: Justice Lowy clears contested Berkshire Museum art for auction”

American hockey legend #GloucesterMA Ben Smith inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame

Ben Smith US Hockey Hall of Fame

From the United States Hockey Hall of Fame printed matter, hockey player and stellar hockey coach, Ben Smith:

Ben Smith (Gloucester, Mass.) served as head coach of the U.S. Olympic Women’s Ice Hockey Team in 1998, 2002 and 2006, leading Team USA to the first-ever gold medal in women’s hockey at the 1998 Winter Olympic Games. It was the crowning achievement in a storied coaching career. 

Described by his players as a direct and passionate perfectionist, Smith compiled a 37-7 record in IIHF Women’s World Championship and Olympic competition during his tenure at the helm from 1996 to 2006, a span that included two gold medals, six silver medals and one bronze medal. And while Smith’s high-profile exploits as a women’s hockey coach gained him enshrinement into the IIHF Hall of Fame in 2016, his hall-of-fame résumé extends far beyond a single brilliant decade. 

The son of a U.S. Senator*, Smith was a standout hockey player at Harvard University in the late 1960s. After graduation, he served as an assistant men’s hockey coach at the University of Massachusetts Amherst while also coaching high school hockey in Gloucester. He eventually became a men’s hockey assistant coach at Yale University, where he served for five seasons before joining Jack Parker’s coaching staff at Boston University. During his nine seasons at BU, the Terriers made three NCAA Tournament appearances and won four Beanpot Tournament championships. 

Smith’s first taste of international competition came in 1985 when he was named an assistant coach for the U.S. National Junior Team. He served in a similar capacity in 1986 and 1987 and was also an assistant coach for the 1987 U.S. Men’s National Team. In 1988, Smith was appointed as an assistant coach for the U.S. Olympic Men’s Ice Hockey Team. He soon earned his first head coaching appointment, taking the helm at Dartmouth College in 1990 and then moving to the same role at Northeastern University, where he led the Huskies to an NCAA Tournament appearance in 1994.

Smith remains active with USA Hockey serving in a player evaluation role for many international teams, including the gold medal-winning 2017 U.S. National Junior Team.”

 

*I’ve run into articles and archival material about both Ben Smith II and III. On GMG, Nicole posted beautiful and direct experiences about Ben Smith like this one: https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2015/12/18/olympic-dreams/

Janice Shea wrote me after a GMG post about Gloucester atheletes and Harvard (and Olympic!) connections*Ben Smith Senior, of Annisquam, was President John F Kennedy’s roommate at Harvard. He became Massachusetts Senator when JFK became president. Here’s a link to the Ben Smith II obit  http://www.nytimes.com/1991/09/28/obituaries/benjamin-smith-75-us-senator-in-1960-s.html  and wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_A._Smith_II.  And here for Ben Smith III (junior) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Smith_(ice_hockey_coach)   plus an interesting read about his coaching http://old.post-gazette.com/olympics/20020218olyhockfill0218p8.asp 

Gloucester Daily Times article about Hall of Fame induction

Bring it home! Rockefeller Edward Hopper #GloucesterMA Dogtown painting @ChristiesInc

EDWARD HOPPER Cape Ann Granite oc 29 x 40 1928 est 6 to 9 mil private collection Rockefeller

Christies, the New York auction power house is currently marketing the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection across the (art)world–Hong Kong, London, and Los Angeles– before the spring 2018 live sale back in New York. The collection includes a painting by American artist, Edward Hopper (1882-1967), that was inspired by Gloucester: Cape Ann Granite is one of the rare Hopper paintings remaining that’s not currently held in a museum. There are more than 110 Gloucester houses and vistas depicted by Edward Hopper.

Advance promotion of Christie’s upcoming Rockefeller auction have yet to illustrate the painting, although the artist’s recognizable name is mentioned in every press release and the painting is included in the world tour highlights exhibit. The catalogue for the sale is not ready.

Former owners of Cape Ann Granite have in common connections to Harvard, banking and art collecting

Billionaire and philanthropist, David Rockefeller (1915-2017), was a Harvard graduate and longtime CEO of Chase Manhattan bank (later JP Morgan Chase). His art appreciation began early,  influenced by both parents and the Rockefeller family collections. His father was the only son of  John D. Rockefeller, a co-founder of Standard Oil Corp. His mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (1874-1948), helped establish the Museum of Modern Art, and the fund in her name helped secure Hopper’s Corner Saloon for the permanent collection. Several family members were Trustees. After his mother’s death, David took her Trustee seat.

Like David Rockefeller, the first owner to acquire Cape Ann Granite was a Harvard graduate, art collector and financier, about the same age as Rockefeller’s parents, and Hopper. Benjamin Harrison Dibblee (1876 – 1945) was the scion of  California businessman, Albert Dibblee. The family estate “Fernhill” was built in 1870 in Ross, California (later the Katharine Branson School). Benjamin H Dibblee was a Harvard graduate (1895-1899), an All-American Crimson football player (halfback and Team Captain), and head coach (1899-1900). W.H. Lewis, a famous center rush, was the Assistant Coach. (Harvard football dominated under this coaching team. See the standings below the “read more’ break.) In 1909, Dibblee donated his father’s historic papers concerning California’s secret Civil War group “The Home Guard of 1861” including its muster roll and pledge of loyalty to Lincoln and the Union cause. Dibblee was an alternate delegate from California to the Republican National Convention in 1912. As a  Lt. Col. he was listed as one of five California committee members for the American Legion in 1919. He was a big wheel investment banker at EH Rollins & Sons, a firm impacted by the Wall Street crash of 1929.

Benjamin Harrison Dibblee Harvard Football all american then Captain Wikipedia photo first purchaser of Edward Hopper Cape Ann Granite Gloucester MA Dogtown painting later owned by Rock
Wikipedia photo of Dibblee  from The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association football guide, 1899

It’s fun to think about Dibblee possibly visiting Gloucester during his time at Harvard, like so many students and faculty; then, decades later, acquiring a major Hopper because it was both a modern masterpiece, and a Gloucester landscape.

The Hopper Cape Ann Granite painting has me itching to research all Crimson team photos– not simply varsity nor football circa 1895-97– because of the (remote) chance of another Gloucester-Harvard and athletic connection. In 1895 Dibblee was involved with sports at Harvard at the same time as author and Olympian, James Connolly.  In 1899 both were involved with football; Dibblee as the Harvard coach and Connolly as Gloucester’s athletic director and football player**. Maybe they scrimmaged. Maybe they scrimmaged in Gloucester.

Hopper’s artist inventory log pages for ‘1928 oils’ itemizes Cape Ann Granite as follows: “Sent on from Gloucester September 27, 1928, 3 canvases. Cape Ann Granite, 29 x 40, Green picture on hill with rocks. Fresh green in foreground. Slanting shadows cast by rocks and boulders. Sky blue with clouds. Small tree on R. BH Mr. Dibblee 49 Wall Streeet of San Francisco (Lived near 14 miles from San Francisco. Knows Alex Baldwin in Calif. (SanFrancisco) 1500 -1/3. 1000 on June 5, 194 ” 

EDWARD HOPPER diary page includes Gloucester entries
From Hopper’s Artist’s ledger -Book, ink graphite on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, Gift of Lloyd Goodrich

 

The pencil annotation “Modern Masters EH 1933” accompanying the thumbnail sketch for the painting on the right of this entry may be mixed up. There was a  “Modern Masters” exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) held in 1940 but it did not include this painting on the checklist. There was an Edward Hopper Retrospective held at MoMA October 30–December 8 in 1933 that did list this Gloucester painting, and the lender, Dibblee. (Incidentally, two other 1928 oils catalogued on that same inventory page, Manhattan Bridge Loop and Freightcars Gloucester, would both end up in the Addison Gallery collection at Phillips Academy.)

The Pure Landscapes

Excerpts from the 1933 MoMa Hopper retrospective exhibition catalogue:

“…When Hopper went to art school the swagger brushstroke of such painters as Duveneck, Henri, and Chase was much admired. Perhaps as a reaction against this his own brushwork has grown more and more modest until it is scarcely noticeable. He shuns all richness of surface save where it helps him to express a particular sensation…in spite of his matter-of-factness, Hopper is a master of pictorial drama. But his actors are rarely human: the houses and thoroughfares of humanity are there, but they are peopled more often by fire hydrants, lamp posts, barber poles and telegraph poles than by human beings. When he does introduce figures among his buildings they often seem merely incidental. Perhaps during his long years as an illustrator he grew tired drawing obviously dramatic figures for magazines. Hopper has painted a few pictures in which there are neither men nor houses. The pure landscapes Cape Ann Granite (9), Hills, South Truro (16), Camel’s Hump (22) occupy a place apart in his work. they reveal a power which is diconcertingly hard to analyze. Cezanne and Courbet and John Crome convey sometimes a similar depth of feeling towards the earth and nature…” Alfred Barr, 1933

“In its most limited sense, modern art would seem to concern itself only with the technical innovations of the period. In its larger and to me irrevocable sense it is the art of all time; of definite personalites that remain forever modern by the fundamental truth that is in them. It makes Moliere at his greatest as new as Ibsen, or Giotto as modern as Cezanne.” Edward Hopper, 1933 

Yale owns a related watercolor by Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Pasture

EDWARD HOPPER, oil on canvas, Yale University collection, Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester by Catherine Ryan

 

Catherine Ryan art image design Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MAProceeds from the sale of the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection at Christies next spring will benefit 10 selected charities. Perhaps a magnanimous collector might consider this Hopper Dogtown purchase for the Cape Ann Museum, a philanthropic twofer in this case, and needed. Cape Ann Museum does not possess a Hopper Gloucester painting and if any musuem should, it’s CAM. We need to eventually guide back the Hopper painting Gloucester Street, too.

Gloucester Street private collection Edward Hopper all around Gloucester

Glou Street Edward Hopper

To date Christie’s auction house has promoted primarily a Picasso and Matisse as the star lots from this collection of masterpieces because of their hefty valuation. The presale estimate for the Matisse Odalisque couchée aux magnolias (1923) is 50 million.  The Picasso painting, Fillette à la corbeille fleurie (1905), a “Rose period Masterwork”, is estimated to top 70 million. The presale estimate for the Hopper is 6 million to 8 million.

Christies highlight page for Rockefeller does not show the Hopper yet Dec 12 2017
Christies first press roll out features the Pciasso and Matisse

 

The Picasso was diplayed in the  libary of  the Rockefeller Upper East Side mansion at 146 East 65th Street.   Its first owners were Gertrude and Leo Stein. Gertrude Stein hated it though her brother bought it anyway. After Alice B. Toklas (Stein’s partner) died in 1965,  MoMa trustees drew lots and were offered first pass on the legendary Stein collection. David Rockefeller won first pick, and selected the Picasso. I wonder how it will fare in this #metoo awakening. At the time of her death, Toklas had long been evicted from their Paris home as she had no legal standing nor benefit from any estate sales.

Gertrude and Leo Stein Rockefeller Picasso provenance
installation Leo and Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas collection at home
installation Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas

Continue reading “Bring it home! Rockefeller Edward Hopper #GloucesterMA Dogtown painting @ChristiesInc”

Gatorade High School Athlete of the Year gives $11,000 to Special Olympics

Riley James, a Junior at Barnstable High School and two time Boston Herald All Scholastic gave $1000 to a cause near and dear to her heart: Cape Cod Champs Special Olympics. She won the money from earning the distinction of Gatorade MA Volleyball Player of the Year.  Riley went on to win the national Gatorade Play it Forward contest which awarded an additional $10,000! Riley wrote about her friend, Sara, and the programs in Barnstable schools and Cape Cod Champs where she volunteers. Sara is my goddaughter.

Coach Tom Turco led the Barnstable girls volleyball team to 18 Division One State Championships, the most wins in Massachusetts girls’ volleyball history. Turco established adapted physical education in Barnstable.

“Everyone has their needs, just in different ways,” (Coach) Turco 

“You’re only as successful as the will of your players,” Turco said. “You have to practice and take time to develop the will of your players.” 

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Sara loves sports and manages the high school volleyball team. Here she is #16 with the Cape Cod Champs volleyball team at Special Olympics, Harvard, Boston MA. 

The Cape Cod Champs Special Olympics equivalent organization here in Gloucester and throughout Cape Ann is Cape Ann SNAP. Learn more about the Cape Ann Special Needs Assistance Program http://capeannsnap.org/ Local  friends and supporters include: CATA, Azorean, North Shore 104.9, Dunkin Donuts, The Bridge Cape Ann, Turning Point Systems, Maplewood Car Wash, Gloucester House, Beauport ambulance, Protective Packaging, Beauport Princess, George’s of Gloucester, Beauport Princess, USA Demolition, JM Vacation Home Rentals, Prince Insurance Agency, Jalapenos, Sudbay, Passports, Katrina’s, Destinos, Wicked Peacock, Lat 43, and microfiber greens towel. Support also includes Mark Adrian, Lone Gull, Kids Unlimited, Topside Grill, Marshall’s Farmstand and the Fish Shack

Read the fabulous Riley James Cape Cod Champs essay for Gatorade Massachusetts Volleyball Player of the Year, plus a bit more inspiration from amazing Coach Turco

Continue reading “Gatorade High School Athlete of the Year gives $11,000 to Special Olympics”

The New Yorker Magazine- Louis Menand checks out Gloucester TS Eliot House

 

Not surprisingly, the Eliot House writers’ retreat is getting some major ink. Pulitzer Prize winning author, Louis Menand, writes about his visit this past spring, fleshing out some context and the mission of the T.S. Eliot Foundation. I’d tweak the title “one paradox”. Menand has written about Eliot before: his first published book was Discovering Modernism: T. S. Eliot and His Context, 1987.

“…Eliot’s father, Henry, who ran a company that manufactured bricks, took the family to Massachusetts every summer, and in 1896, the year Eliot turned eight, Henry built a big house on Cape Ann, in Gloucester, overlooking the outer harbor. Until Eliot went off to Europe, in 1914, he spent his summers there…”

The New Yorker Louis Menand T S Eliot House

HarborWalk T S Eliot marker

 

Stacy Boulevard Public Works stunner | Gloucester is an early client for the Harvard and Olmsted trained landscape designer Thomas Warren Sears. His 1908 photos are a must see! Part 2

 

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The Gloucester Daily Times published this image in 1923 with the photo caption: “Now Under Construction on the Southern Side of Western Avenue, this Project When Completed Will Give Gloucester one of the Finest Approaches of Any City on the Atlantic Seaboard.”  The meticulously hand drawn credit within the drawing itself caught my eye as much as the drawing: “Proposed Treatment of Waterfront, Gloucester, Mass. Thomas W. Sears Landscape Architect, Providence RI”. Thomas W. Sears was a remarkable 20th Century landscape designer. The modern Boulevard work completed in 2014-17 gracefully carries out and returns to the original dreams for the Western Avenue highway and park that are more than a century in the making.

 

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photo caption: Boulevard construction progress © Catherine Ryan, December 2016 

Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966) preliminary designs for Gloucester’s future Boulevard

Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts, and grew up in this elegant abode at the corner of Beacon and Charles Street. This black and white house portrait was shot in 1897.

1897 Thomas William Sears the Sears family home Brookline corner of Beacon and charles streets

Here’s a Google street view photo for comparison today.

google earth brookline sears family home

 

After being ousted from the New York City parks department, the ‘father of American landscape design’, Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), launched his business a ten minute walk from the Sears family home.  The headquarters at 99 Warren Street was named “Fairsted” and was in operation until 1979 when it was declared a National Historic Site and transferred to the National Parks.

 

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photo caption: Frederick Law Olmsted Fairsted  © Jack Boucher, Library of Congress collection

If there was no neighbor connection early on, a professional one came soon: Sears worked for the Olmsted Brothers immediately after receiving two degrees from Harvard– his BA in 1903 and his BS in 1906. (There may have been an earlier Brookline connection.) Rather quickly Sears left to set up his own firm: first in Providence, RI, when he did work for Gloucester’s Boulevard, and not long after in Philadelphia. In 1911 he gave a talk for the Proceedings of the Engineers’ Club of Philadelphia 28 (April 1911):147-158., “The Functions of the Landscape Architect in Connection with the Improvement of a City” available online as part of an urban planning anthology compiled by John W. Reps, Professor Emeritus, Cornell University.  I wonder if he shared his Gloucester photographs as part of his talk?

“There are two main approaches to cities: (1) On water by boat, and (2) on land by railroad. Along both of these lines of approach land should be taken for public use, and for very different reasons. Take first the use of water fronts: Unless some provision is made for the public, the whole water front, whether it be river or harbor, may be usurped by commercial enterprise and the public deprived of ever seeing the water except when aboard a boat. In certain cases, as in New York, where the water front must of necessity be utilised for dockage, a combination of commercial and public use may be successfully employed. There the docks are owned by the city and leased by the steamship companies; in this way their appearance can be controlled. At present it is planned to build on the tops of these docks huge recreation parks which may be used by the public.”- 1911 Thomas W. Sears

Mike Hale’s contemporary perspective shares a similar philosophy with Sears:

“An effort has been made in this paper to show clearly that landscape architecture is utilitarian quite as much as esthetic; that whatever one is designing, whether it be a city plan or any of the elements in a city, the design should be governed by use as much as beauty.” – 1911 Thomas W. Sears

By 1917 Sears was commissioned regularly and had a long, full career including notable designs for the Reynolda estate now part of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the wildly influential outdoor amphitheater for Swarthmore College, the Scott Outdoor Auditorium. His work in Gloucester is rarely mentioned.

Since the Gloucester drawing was marked ‘Providence’, I knew the drawing was done long before the 1923 construction. I tentatively dated the schematic ca.1910. Thankfully Thomas Warren Sears was a photographer, too. Turns out that this image is a Sears’ photograph of a lovely Sears’ design. The glass negative is dated 1908 which squares with his professional career timeline.

 

thomas Warren Sears rendering and photograph aag title a perspective drawing for the area along what is now stacy boulevard

ALL NEW LED LIGHTS

One of the modern design elements is the welcome ornamentation of lights. They feel like they were always here because line is such an essential part of design and they add the vertical visual interest. When I saw the new light bases I thought of the line of trees in the Sears drawing. I love the mix of natural and formal design in his rendering, but am equally gobsmacked by the sweeping open vista. Both are sensitive approaches and part of the context of the Boulevard’s build.

IMG_20161202_101109-ANIMATION

photo caption: animation emphasizing new lights, late November 2016, ©c. ryan

BEFORE THE BOULEVARD- Sears photos

Thomas Warren Sears photographed Western Avenue for his preparatory work. See the homes along the beach that were later removed for the construction of the Boulevard; distant vistas to the Surfside Hotel (built after Pavilion burned) and Stage Fort park; and Western Avenue street scenes looking east and west before the road was widened.

 

Thomas Warren Sears seawall and park area1908 Thomas Warren Sears looking west along the seawall

Thomas warren Sears glass negative houses along the beach later removed for the creation of Stacy Boulevard

More photos and Gloucester designs:

Continue reading “Stacy Boulevard Public Works stunner | Gloucester is an early client for the Harvard and Olmsted trained landscape designer Thomas Warren Sears. His 1908 photos are a must see! Part 2”

What if…a section of Dogtown brush was cleared away? If you missed Chris Leahy at Sawyer Free Library last week come to a summit by Essex County Greenbelt & Mass Audubon at Cape Ann Museum March 4

“This Saturday morning forum is offered in collaboration with Essex County Greenbelt, Friends of Dogtown, Lanesville Community Center and Mass Audubon and held at Cape Ann Museum. The forum will be moderated by Ed Becker, President of the Essex County Greenbelt Association.”

Register here

UPDATE: Cape Ann TV is scheduled to film the event!

hopper-yale
Edward Hopper Cape Ann Pasture watercolor drawing (ca.1928) was gifted to Yale University in 1930
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East Gloucester Atwood’s Gallery on the Moors as seen on the left in 1921–open vistas at that time

 

Chris Leahy gave a presentation at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library on February 23, 2017: Dogtown- the Biography of a Landscape: 750 Million Years Ago to the Present
A photographic history through slides presented by the Gloucester Lyceum and the Friends of the Library. Mary Weissblum opened the program.

Chris broadly covered the history of the local landscape from an ecological bent with a bias to birds and blueberry picking, naturally. New England is a patchwork of forested landscapes. He stressed the evolution of bio diversity and succession phenomenon when the earth and climate change. “Nature takes a lot of courses.” He focused on Dogtown, “a very special place”, and possible merits of land stewardship geared at fostering greater biodiversity. Perhaps some of the core acres could be coaxed to grasslands as when parts of Gloucester were described as moors? Characteristic wildlife, butterflies, and birds no longer present may swing back.  There were many philosophical takeaways and tips: he recommends visiting the dioramas “Changes in New England Landscape” display at Harvard Forest HQ in Petersham.

“Isolation of islands is a main driver of evolution”

“Broad Meadow Brook Wildlife Sanctuary in Worcester has the highest concentration* of native butterflies in all of Massachusetts because of secondary habitats.”  *of Mass Audubon’s c.40,000 acres of wildlife sanctuaries statewide. “The fact that Brook Meadow Brook is in greater Worcester, rather than a forested wilderness, underscores the value of secondary habitats.”

“1830– roughly the time of Thoreau (1817-1862)– was the maximum period of clearing thus the heyday for grasslands…As farmsteads were abandoned, stages of forests return.”

Below are photos from February 23, 2017. I added some images of art inspired by Dogtown. I also pulled out a photograph by Frank L Cox, David Cox’s father, of Gallery on the Moors  (then) compared with a photo of mine from 2011 to illustrate how the picturesque description wasn’t isolated to Dogtown.

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Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Granite, 1928, oil on canvas can we get this painting into the Cape Ann Museum collection?

dogtown-cape-ann-massachuestts-by-louise-upton-brumback-o-c-vose-galleryLouise Upton Brumback (1867-1929), Dogtown- Cape Ann, 1920 oil on canvas

atwood-cox-gallery-on-the-moors-photo-1921

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS PAPEL PICADO

I love the designs of the Papel Picado, especially the Dia de los Muertos skeletons doing everyday things. I found some at Nomad in Cambridge. Deb Colburn, the owner, curates gorgeous folk art for her shop from all around Mexico, and from all around the world. She’s a very sweet person to stop in and visit with, and is also very knowledge about Mexican culture. Nomad is located at 1741 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge.

LEARNING ABOUT DAY OF THE DEAD TRADITIONS

There is a beautiful ofrenda at the Peabody Museum at Harvard, which is where I learned about the Mexican Purépecha indigenous people’s name for the Monarch butterfly, the “Harvester.” The altar is part of the Museum’s permanent collection and is on display year round.

dayofthedeadaltar1_webFrom the Peabody Museum at Harvard’s Dia de los Muertos exhibit.

The Peabody Museum’s exhibition of a Day of the Dead ofrenda or altar is located in the Encounters With the Americas gallery. The exhibit features pieces from the Alice P. Melvin Collection of Mexican Folk Art and represents the Aztec origins of the holiday and the Catholic symbols incorporated into the tradition, from skeletons to plush Jesus figures.

The altar is contained within a box covered with panels that were decorated by local students and regional and international artists. The altars were designed by the Peabody exhibitions staff and Mexican artists Mizael Sanchez and Monica Martinez.

Originating with the Aztecs, the Mexican Day of the Dead is a unique blend of Mesoamerican and Christian rituals. The holiday, which is celebrated on November 1, All Saints’ Day, is usually dedicated to children; November 2, All Souls’ Day, is dedicated to adults.

Traditions vary from region to region, but generally families gather at cemeteries to tend and decorate the graves of their departed loved ones and remember them by telling stories, eating their favorite foods, and dancing in their honor. Many families build altars at home, decorated with flowers and food, especially pan de muerto or “bread of the dead.” A festive and social occasion, the holiday welcomes the return of those who have died and recognizes the human cycle of life and death.

The Peabody’s permanent altar features items from the Alice P. Melvin collection of Mexican folk art. To see these items, click here.

Curated by Davíd Carrasco, Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America and Mexican artist Mizael Sanchez.

To watch a video interview with Mizael Sanchez, click here.

Today’s Google Doodle has Gloucester Ma connection

120th-anniversary-of-first-modern-olympic-games-google doodle

Today is the first day of track and field at O’Maley Innovation Middle School. On this 120th anniversary of the first day of the modern Olympics (thanks Google Doodle), may our student athletes be inspired by James Brendan Connolly. Before he was a Harvard spurner, a Veteran, a Gloucester Master Mariner, a sea tales chronicler and beloved writer,  James Connolly was one of 14 American athletes (5 were Bostonians) to compete in the international Games of the I Olympiad in Athens, Greece, 1896.Twenty percent of the international competitors were from the United States.

Connolly medalled. Twice. On the first final of the opening day, Connolly won what is now the triple jump and came in 2nd in the high jump. He sailed home a champion, the first Olympic medal winner in 1500 years. This recognition no doubt helped his byline and he rapidly gained a reputation as a fantastic writer. The Boston Globe published his first war correspondence, “Letters from the Front in Cuba” where he served with the Irish 9th Infantry of Massachusetts. His career soars after writing about Gloucestermen from his days working in Gloucester. I’ll let Connolly take it from here, it’s so good:

Continue reading “Today’s Google Doodle has Gloucester Ma connection”