Week 3 FIRSTS #GloucesterMA | Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School – good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Over six weeks I’m posting local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students.

Mr. Goulart’s LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK THREE 

WEEK 3 of 6: FIRSTS

Below is a list of 15 locations. Each one requires an image with a group member in it.

  1. The location of Gloucester’s first“Four Year High School”
  2. The location of Gloucester’s first Brick Building?
  3. The first schoolmaster and town clerk’s house. (private property do not trespass).
  4. A list of the first recorded Gloucester fishermen lost at sea. (Hint: 1716)
  5. The location of the first carillon built in America.
  6. The location of Gloucester’s oldest surviving burial ground for the First Parish.
  7. The location of Gloucester’s first town hall.
  8. The location named after the first settled minister on Cape Ann.
  9. An example of a First Period house. (include the year of the house)
  10. Mural depicting the “Founding of Gloucester”. (the first pioneers) Hint: Build not for today alone, build for tomorrow as well.
  11. The house that was the first location of a library in Gloucester.
  12. The location of the first city owned bridge. It was a drawbridge moved by a hand-cranked winch.
  13. The first statue formerly atop the Our Lady of Good Voyage Church.
  14. The plaque for the first meeting house green. (a.k.a Meeting House Plain)
  15. The first location for the YMCA in Gloucester Mass.

 

Prior Posts

3/21/19 Week Two results

3/17/19 Week Two trivia questions

3/14/19 Week One results

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

RESULTS WEEK 2 Defending #GloucesterMA | try Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt Throwback Thursday #TBT

Gloucester High School_20190318_photo © catherine ryan.jpg
Gloucester, Mass.- Great teacher at Gloucester High School, Shaun Goulart, creates a local history scavenger hunt trivia game for his 9th grade students that takes place weekly for 6 weeks. We’re taking the challenge one week after the students. Good luck!

ANSWERS TO SHAUN GOULART’S LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK TWO

How did you do? Week two delved into scenes of historic battles. I’ve added some background. Stop here if you prefer to go back to see Week 2 questions only from 3/17/19 

WEEK 2: DEFENDING GLOUCESTER Location #1

  • Who was the first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony? ANSWER –  ROGER CONANT
    • Go to the location of the fort named after him and take a picture with a member in it. *Stage Fort Park “Fisherman’s Field”

*“In 1623, 14 English fishermen set up the first European colony on Cape Ann here in what was then Fisherman’s Field and is now Stage Fort Park. These ramparts overlook the harbor, first built during the Revolutionary War, renewed for the War of 1812, the Civil War and the Spanish American War. Alas, those first settlers, sent across the ocean by the Dorchester Company, were unable to live off the sea and these rock-bound fields. They moved a few miles south to what is now Salem in 1626. Then, within a decade, there were enough permanent settlers on Cape Ann to incorporate the town of Gloucester. The first meetinghouse was built on the Town Green in 1642 near what is now the Grant Circle rotary of Route 128. The City set this land aside as a public park in 1898 and its Tablet Rock was dedicated by Henry Cabot Lodge in 1907.  James R. Pringle was designated to write the inscription for the bronze plaque. The execution of the design was by Eric Pape. “The nautical scheme of decorative framework and embellishment was the composite suggestion” of various committees dating as far back as the 1880s.” *see Gloucester HarborWalk Stage Fort Park marker #42  photo on marker ©Sharon Lowe. See also Stage Fort Park then/now photos in prior GMG post

Bronze tribute plaques embedded in Tablet Rock at Stage Fort Park detail the site’s history and were commissioned and unveiled at different times. The monumental and stunning Founders plaque from 1907 on Tablet Rock itself is in fantastic condition. Two DAR plaques were inlaid on the glacial outcroppings past half moon beach on the way to the cannons. The Fisherman’s Field (ca.1930) is so worn it’s nearly indecipherable, though that’s part of its charm. The plaque compels close inspection, lingering and discovery. It’s a fun family activity for anyone who likes a challenge. For those who want help reading the content, I transcribed it back in 2010. Scroll down below the “read more” break in this post to open.

 

  • During which war did it receive this name? ANSWER – FORT CONANT during the Civil War 
detail-battery-k
When you zoom in on this 1901 photograph, you can see the big ‘Battery K’-  for the Spanish American War (Camp Hobson) Fort conant during Civil War

 

Location #2

location 2 courtesy photos

 

  • Take a picture at Fort Point with the former location of the Coast Guard Aviation Station behind you (must be visible in the picture) ANSWER – TEN POUND ISLAND
  • What was the fort called on Fort Point? ANSWER – FORT DEFIANCE Fort Point Hill, Fort Lillie (Lily)
  • Name a war it was utilized in. ANSWER – Efforts to fortify as early as 1703 (see Pringle) ATTACK OF CAPTAIN LINDSAY (OR LINZEE) 1775 –population about 5000 –REVOLUTIONARY WAR, WAR OF 1812, CIVIL WAR

“In 1743, what is known as the old fort on Commercial Street, now encroached upon and surrounded by buildings, was completed. On this point, well selected strategically, is a hill which effectually commands the inner harbor. In 1742 and 1742, the General Court appropriated 527 pounds to defray the cost of fortification. Breastworks were thrown up and eight 12-pounders placed in position in the fort. The immediate cause of its erection was the fear of French incursions, but these fears were never realized. An effort had been made as early as 1703 to fortify the place, but the petition of the selectmen to the General Court for an appropriation for the purpose was refused. The petition shows that he harbor, even at that early date was extensively frequent for shelter, and was “very seldom free from vessels.”

“In order to be better prepared for future assaults breastworks were thrown up at Stage Fort, the Cut, Duncan’s Point and Fort Point. This, however was the last attack by sea or land that the people experienced.”

Location #3

  • From Fort Point go to the location of the seven-gun earthwork battery and barracks in ramparts field. Take a picture with the old towers in the background (do not go on private property) ANSWER –  EASTERN POINT FORT by eminent domain, Ramparts Field Road Fort Hill 
  • Name a war it was utilized in  ANSWER –  CIVIL WAR

“Immediate action was taken toward the erection of fortifications. Land at Eastern Point, belonging to Thomas Niles was acquired by the government, and earthwork fort erected and manned…”

Screenshot

  • Screenshot Google Earth with all three above locations in it and circle them. Submit the image.

map.jpg

Continue reading “RESULTS WEEK 2 Defending #GloucesterMA | try Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt Throwback Thursday #TBT”

Week 2 Defending Gloucester | Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School – good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Over six weeks I’m posting local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students.

Mr. Goulart’s LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK TWO

WEEK 2 of 6: DEFENDING GLOUCESTER

Location #1

  • Who was the first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony?
    • Go to the location of the fort named after him and take a picture with a member in it.
    • During which war did it receive this name?

Location #2

  • Take a picture at Fort Point with the former location of the Coast Guard Aviation Station behind you (must be visible in the picture)
  • What was the fort called on Fort Point?
  • Name a war it was utilized in.

Location #3

  • From Fort Point go to the location of the seven-gun earthwork battery and barracks in ramparts field. Take a picture with the old towers in the background (do not go on private property)
  • Name a war it was utilized in?

Screenshot

  • Screenshot Google Earth with all three above locations in it and circle them. Submit the image.

Prior Posts

3/14/19 Week One results

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

 

RESULTS WEEK 1 | try Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt #GloucesterMA Throwback Thursday

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan
Gloucester, Mass.- Great teacher at Gloucester High School, Shaun Goulart, creates a local history scavenger hunt trivia game for his 9th grade students that takes place weekly for 6 weeks. We’re taking the challenge one week after the students. Good luck!

ANSWERS TO SHAUN GOULART’S LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK ONE

 

How did you do? Week one delved into the history of Cape Pond Ice. More than one player “had to call a friend”, Scott Memhard, owner of Cape Pond Ice and City Councilor. He kindly shared supplemental archival material included in this post. Stop here if you prefer to go back to see questions only from 3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

Continue to scroll for the answers.

 

courtesy photo from Scott Memhard Cape Pond Ice Gloucester Mass (3)

1)In 1848 a blacksmith named Nathaniel R. Webster started a company by damming a local brook. What did the brook become known as?  ANSWER. VETERANS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CAMPUS

2)What did Webster’s company become known as? ANSWER. CAPE POND ICE

3)Take a picture at the present day location of the company 

20160718_© catherine ryan.jpg

4)Take a picture of the street named after him with a member in it. ANSWER. WEBSTER STREET

5)What is in place of the brook today?  MATTOS FIELD-  ABOVE = FRAT CLUB AND BELOW EVENTUALLY LEADS INTO LITTLE RIVER AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH

WATER PATH.jpg

6)Take a picture at the location of the old dam with a member in front. ANSWER. THE SCHOOL

 

 

 

PART II

7)A competitor to Webster named Francis W. Homans in 1876 created a 32 acre man-made lake. What is the lake known as? ANSWER. FERNWOOD LAKE

 

 

8)Submit a screenshot of a map of the lake (Google Maps or Google Earth)

Fernwood lake.jpg

9)What year did the two companies merge? ANSWER. 1908

Courtesy photos below from Scott Memhard, Cape Pond Ice, Cape Ann Museum

 

 

Courtesy photo from David Collins-

“My grandfather, Millard Collins, Sr., worked for one of the ice houses for a while. He died in 1918 at age 29 in the Spanish Flu pandemic. At that time he was working for LePages’s and had taken a leave of absence to care for his brother, Jacob, who had contracted the flu first. Jacob died October 17, 1918, and my grandfather died October 28, 1918…”

“I’m enclosing a picture of my grandfather and his horse-drawn ice wagon. You can see the word “ICE” faintly written on the inside back of the wagon. The youngster atop the horse is my father, who was born in July,1912, so I date the picture to about 1913 or so.”

courtesy photo from david collins.jpg

Prior Posts

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

 

What makes a #GreatTeacher? Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School! Week 1 of 6- good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Knowing how much Gloucester fans enjoy history and hearing when it’s integrated into the school curriculum, I thought GMG readers would like to know about a Local History Trivia game 2019 by Gloucester High School teacher, Shaun Goulart, AND to give it a go!

And who doesn’t like a great teacher story?

For the next six weeks I’ll post local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger hunt project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students. No thoughts about what the prize could be for this tandem run.

I’ll post the quiz just after the students’ weekly deadline, and post the answers the following Wednesday. Leave your answers in the comments below( or email) — first all correct submission will earn top points.

GHS Gloucester Mass_20190129_© catherine Ryan

The GMG point structure for Shaun Goulart’s local history trivia hunt 2019 will be as follows:

  • First submission correct on first day, Sunday  = 5 points
  • Submitted Correctly first day, Sunday = 4 points
  • Submitted Correctly second day, Monday  = 3 points
  • Submitted Correctly third day, Tuesday = 2 points
  • Submitted Correctly Wednesday = 1 point

LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK ONE

1)In 1848 a blacksmith named Nathaniel R. Webster started a company by damming a local brook. What did the brook become known as?

2)What did Webster’s company become known as?

3)Take a picture at the present day location of the company (selfie or with a member in it)

4)Take a picture of the street named after him with a member in it.

5)What is in place of the brook today?

6)Take a picture at the location of the old dam with a member in front.

PART II

7)A competitor to Webster named Francis W. Homans in 1876 created a 32 acre man-made lake. What is the lake known as?

8)Submit a screenshot of a map of the lake (Google Maps or Google Earth)

9)What year did the two companies merge?

*We’ll see how the photo part plays out. Maybe there’s a bonus for great photos 🙂

snow_20190306_Gloucester Mass © catherine ryan
What fun from teacher Shaun Goulart! The answers could be anywhere out there

To music teacher, with love & the kids are alright (what a happy Massachusetts story!)

Friends from New York, Kansas City and Los Angeles shared this heartwarming feel good wedding rehearsal story- Hingham Middle School students surprise their teacher.  #MassProud

Inside Edition Kid's Choir surprises Hingham Mass music teacher.jpg

Gloucester Public School 10th Anniversary ARTS festival

Beautiful colorful banners on Dale Avenue announce GPS 10th anniversary annual ARTS festival, Saturday May 12th 11-4pm, at City Hall, Cape Ann Museum, and Sawyer Free Library! Sponsored by Gloucester Education Foundation; what a milestone!

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Cape Ann Museum Kids Calligraphy with Albina Papows!

CAM Kids Calligraphy.jpg

Learn calligraphy basics in a morning class with specialist Albina Papows. Inspired by the special exhibition Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann before 1900. Write your name, use calligraphy tools and leave with a sampler to take home. This family workshop is recommended for children 7 and up with an adult. Registration required. To register, please contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org or (978) 283-0455 x16.

Read more at : http://www.capeannmuseum.org/events/cam-kids-second-saturday04-14-18/

 

free Teacher workshop at Cape Ann Museum with support from Essex Heritage | “Unfolding Histories” exhibition opens March 31!

Exciting news from Cape Ann Museum:

March 2018

Teachers throughout Essex County are invited to Cape Ann Museum to study Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann Before 1900, the first major exhibition to bring together historical and archival material from nine Cape Ann institutions focused on life during Cape Ann’s early years, including stories which illuminate the Native American and European contact period, the Revolutionary War, and 19th century history and culture.

Teachers who attend the April 7th Teacher Workshop will discover strategies to increase student literacy with primary source documents using an inquiry-based learning model to tie larger themes to our local area. Designed for K–12 teachers currently working in public & private schools throughout Essex County, this free workshop is a way to earn 10 PDPs for attending the session and creating an activity plan, with additional opportunities to earn more. Space is limited to twenty teachers; registration required. For more information please contact Essex Heritage Education Director Beth Beringer at bethb@essexheritage.org or (978) 740-0444.

The Unfolding Histories exhibit will be on view March 31, 2018- September 9, 2018. Massachusetts Teacher Association members are admitted free!

 

Carol Ackerman Boston Globe obituary

Lovely tribute to long term teacher and volunteer – Carol Ackerman (December 17, 1941 – October 31, 2017) Boston Globe obituary by Marvin Pave published Dec 3rd (following special memorial service held in the Shalin Liu Performance Center). Ackerman served on many boards in the community — Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free, the Gloucester UU, Rockport Music, and Wellspring.

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Obit in the Gloucester Daily Times

 

Stephanie Benenson HARBOR VOICES light show #GloucesterMA | immigration, conversation & acts of generosity manifest as public art

Stephanie Benenson, artist studio, discussing 2017 Harbor Lights 20171122_091510

Stephanie Benenson, artist studio, discussing Harbor Lights, GIF 1122091429
from a studio visit with Stephanie Benenson Nov 2017

You can join in Stephanie Benenson’s fascinating big vision, Harbor Voices, a public art and cultural piece that’s made from light, sound and community participation. Part of the project is a  large-scale and temporary LIVE light & sound installation which will happen on ten minute loops from 4-8pm on Friday December 8th, and Saturday December 9th, one of many featured events for the 2017 Middle Street Walk. Harbor Voices will be held inside the Kyrouz Auditorium in City Hall , 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA.

Come experience a sweeping ocean of sound, stories and light, drawn by the voices and acts of generosity of neighbors and friends.

Benenson, a Rockport native and North Shore based fine artist, received a prestigious and competitive RISD grant to create Harbor Voices. Benenson collected over 100 stories in eight languages of recent and ancestral immigration to Cape Ann. For the past year she led (and continues to lead) practical and creative storytelling sessions and workshops at area schools like Veteran’s Memorial and Gloucester High School,  as well as community organizations and centers such as Sandy Bay Historical Society. Students talked with Benenson about “their ancestors* and families bringing cultural heritage to Cape Ann.” She said that kids mentioned “family members that started businesses here (like Jalapenos, Sclafanis, and other cultural destinations on Cape Ann)…and how meangingful that was to them…and people that they had deep respect and admiration for…” They discussed “family recipes, music, food and how immigration historically has made American art and culture come alive.”  Mayor Romeo Theken was the first story collected. Other Cape Ann storytellers outside of the schools and non profit partners include: Jean Testaverde (Portuguese fishing ancestry), Ingrid Swan (Swedith quarrying ancestry), Heather Lovett (descendent of Roger Babson), Sal Zerilli (Awesome Gloucester and Rockport), Jan Bell, Buddy Woods, Susannah Natti (Finnish and descendent of Folly Cove designer), Rich Francis (GHS teacher), and Celestino Basille (GHS teacher).

Depending upon age and preference, stories were written, recorded, or drawn. All were mixed into materials and audio that will choreograph connections directly into the light installation, and an enlarging community. At first, Benenson thought the light might guide any audio. Instead voices continue to guide the light.

Every story and act of generosity is linked to the installation and transformed into light.

Blurring the lines between public art and social sculpture, LIVE happening and virtual action, Harbor Voices emblematically presents stories, shared connections and actions. Participants of all ages are encouraged to interact with the project www.harborvoices.com and its installation– to bathe so to speak in a community of vibrancy and waves of interconnectedness and support.  Benenson adds that from 4-6PM during the two days of this installation iteration, “children will be offered a small flashlight to engage with this artwork, allowing them a tangible moment to consider their part in this interconnected network of community and local history by creating their own beam of light.” Also, before the installation opens to the public, one hundred Gloucester High School students –including some who have already added into the piece– will come to City Hall to experience Harbor Voices.

Benenson’s promotion for Harbor Voices launched in September. Leveraging attention for this remarkably ambitious project is an essential component as more involvement means more impact. Straight away it fostered community and brought opportunities. For example, Benenson spoke about the project and shared audio of the stories with Rose Baker seniors, Gloucester Rotary and the Cape Ann Museum’s Red Cottage Society. Someone from Beverly has already underwrittten  support for a class at Veteran’s Memorial Elementary School. She spoke about the project with Joey as part of GMG podcast #253

As a third generation Cape Ann artist, Benenson is especially excited to “create art and conversations around our cultural heritage and our contributions to the vibrant mix of people that live on Cape Ann.”

See more pictures and read more about the artist

Continue reading “Stephanie Benenson HARBOR VOICES light show #GloucesterMA | immigration, conversation & acts of generosity manifest as public art”

BREAKING #GloucesterMA: Passing the legacy– an historic Folly Cove Acorn printing press for the outstanding art department at O’Maley Middle School

Thanks to Mayor Romeo Theken, teacher Brett Dunton, Principal Lucey, and the extreme generosity of Manship Artists Residency & Studios (MARS) under the direction of Rebecca Reynolds, the O’Maley Innovation Middle School ramped up in a powerful fashion with an amazing and enviable addition to the art department:

a rare loan of a Folly Cove Acorn fine art printing press for the art room!

Acorn printing presses were used by Gloucester’s legendary Folly Cove guild of artisans, most notably Virginia Lee Burton, an internationally renowned artist, children’s picture book author-illustrator, dancer, teacher and Folly Cove co-founder. O’Maley students study Gloucester, printmaking, and the history of Folly Cove artists through a myriad of units in each grade and subject, often in partnership with Cape Ann Museum, local artists and other community partners. And now, to have this pedigree press, … Wow! Enjoy some photographs from Brett Dunton from the exciting installation day.

 

teachers Brett Dunton and Ashley Doke with 8th grade students admiring the newly installed famous Acorn press O’Maley Innovation Middle School, Gloucester MA

teachers Brett Dunton and Ashley Doke with 8th grade students admiring the newly installed famous Acorn press O'Maley Innovation Middle School, Gloucester MA

The O’Maley press is one of the last actual Folly Cove presses remaining on Cape Ann. It was owned and used by Elizabeth (Libby) Holoran and Isabel Natti, eventually taking up Holloran’s floor space in the Sarah Elizabeth Store which she opened in 1974. Superstar sculptor, Paul Manship, was Isabel Natti’s grandfather. Aino Natti, Natti’s uncle, was one of the Folly Cove co-founders and the original owner of this particular press. Acorn printing presses were fabricated and distributed by companies like the Adams Brothers in Boston circa 1830-1870. The name “Acorn” comes from the cut away which resembles the shape of an acorn; the presses are RARE and beautiful. One is on view at the Cape Ann Museum.

Mayor Romeo Theken was hopeful that MARS would consider the schools and Gloucester’s students when determing a most suitable location. Teacher Brett Dunton knows Natti and all about this famed press. He was thrilled to build a print room around it and get going. Natti had already given him some of her drying racks. This opportunity would not have happened without MARS working with donors to rescue the press and Mr. Dunton’s expertise and enthusiasm for taking it on. This has to be one of the nicest feel good full circle art stories coming home ever! I look forward to sharing some of the results from the inaugural student printmaking classes, original print editions from this stellar art room addition.

 

 

Students helping neighbors: Scenes from O’Maley day of Service

O'Maley day of Service 2017 West Gloucester

Pauline Bresnahan shares a West Gloucester story:

“Today a Gloucester yellow school bus parked in front of my neighbor’s. Josephine Lally is a retired O’Maley school teacher who lives in West Gloucester. I watched as students with many rakes and tarps got off the bus and went to her back yard. I was told by their 8th. Grade teacher Cheryl Olson that this is a Day of Service for O’Maley school and they chose to stop by to help my neighbor who has had a tough year.”

Thanks, Pauline!

Community fundraisers: O’Maley Washington DC trip and GHS soccer at Market Basket and Jalapenos

Local businesses step up for local schools and organizations! Save the dates

In case you’re wondering what’s happening at Market Basket on October 28th 8:30-3pm:

The BAKE SALE at Market Basket is a fundraiser for O’Maley 8th graders annual special trip to Washington, DC. “This important fundraiser is to provide financial assistance to
those who need it most for the trip.” Items can be dropped off at O’Maley on October 27th or at Market Basket at 8:30 on October 28th. Contact Allison Cousins for more details or if you’d like to help out on Saturday, October 28th email Allison acousins@gloucesterschools.com.  Donations and sponsors for the popular calendar raffle are also underway. Here’s a link to last year’s calendar if you’re interested in participating. You’ll recognize those generous sponsors!

In case you’re wondering what’s happening with GHS soccer raffle tickets:

Soccer players are raising money for the soccer banquet, gifts for senior players, and the soccer program. Raffle tickets are $10 each and each packet has 10 tickets. The prizes are listed on the tickets and are for sale through October 29. Winners will be announced at the fall banquet (date/time TBD)

JV2 has a soccer game at O’Maley today at 4pm. Varsity has a big game — Here’s their record “going into tomorrow night’s match vs Salem. Big game!!!!”

varsity record oct 13 2017

 

In case you’re wondering what’s happening at Jalapeno’s on November 6th:

Save the date for Jalapeno’s Night fundraiser for O’Maley Academy on November
6th. Dine in or take out at Jalapeno’s and a portion of their proceeds goes to O’Maley Academy!

Gatorade High School Athlete of the Year gives $11,000 to Special Olympics

Riley James, a Junior at Barnstable High School and two time Boston Herald All Scholastic gave $1000 to a cause near and dear to her heart: Cape Cod Champs Special Olympics. She won the money from earning the distinction of Gatorade MA Volleyball Player of the Year.  Riley went on to win the national Gatorade Play it Forward contest which awarded an additional $10,000! Riley wrote about her friend, Sara, and the programs in Barnstable schools and Cape Cod Champs where she volunteers. Sara is my goddaughter.

Coach Tom Turco led the Barnstable girls volleyball team to 18 Division One State Championships, the most wins in Massachusetts girls’ volleyball history. Turco established adapted physical education in Barnstable.

“Everyone has their needs, just in different ways,” (Coach) Turco 

“You’re only as successful as the will of your players,” Turco said. “You have to practice and take time to develop the will of your players.” 

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Sara loves sports and manages the high school volleyball team. Here she is #16 with the Cape Cod Champs volleyball team at Special Olympics, Harvard, Boston MA. 

The Cape Cod Champs Special Olympics equivalent organization here in Gloucester and throughout Cape Ann is Cape Ann SNAP. Learn more about the Cape Ann Special Needs Assistance Program http://capeannsnap.org/ Local  friends and supporters include: CATA, Azorean, North Shore 104.9, Dunkin Donuts, The Bridge Cape Ann, Turning Point Systems, Maplewood Car Wash, Gloucester House, Beauport ambulance, Protective Packaging, Beauport Princess, George’s of Gloucester, Beauport Princess, USA Demolition, JM Vacation Home Rentals, Prince Insurance Agency, Jalapenos, Sudbay, Passports, Katrina’s, Destinos, Wicked Peacock, Lat 43, and microfiber greens towel. Support also includes Mark Adrian, Lone Gull, Kids Unlimited, Topside Grill, Marshall’s Farmstand and the Fish Shack

Read the fabulous Riley James Cape Cod Champs essay for Gatorade Massachusetts Volleyball Player of the Year, plus a bit more inspiration from amazing Coach Turco

Continue reading “Gatorade High School Athlete of the Year gives $11,000 to Special Olympics”

Super Gloucester teacher Jessica Linquata boosts journalism at O’Maley with micro grant from awesome, Awesome Gloucester!

Search for @AwesomeGloucester on Facebook and  follow! You’ll see and keep up with great, active and inspiring ideas from the community.

“I am currently in the process of bringing a video journalism multimedia program to the students at O’Maley Innovation Middle School After School Program. The goal of this ongoing project is to teach students to use their voices for good on platforms that are relevant to their peers and community. One of the big idea projects the students brought to the table was to produce Public Service Announcements surrounding issues they face,…” – Jessica Linquata

© Jessica Linquata O'Maley Innovation Middle School Awesome Gloucester micro grantFrom Awesome Gloucester Facebook:

Jessica Linquata, who runs an after school video journalism program at O’Maley, was missing one essential component for her students – HD cameras. So she applied for Awesome Gloucester’s $1000 micro-grant, and tonight Trustee Jacob Belcher handed her the cash she needs to get the equipment. Congratulations, Jessica! 
To see more about Jessica’s project- “What Can I Do? Young Voices for Positive Change!

http://www.awesomefoundation.org/en/projects/84613-what-can-i-do-young-voices-for-positive-change

 

Top notch GPS O’Maley & Veterans teachers engage Cape Ann Museum, Backyard Growers, and Black Earth Composting thanks to Essex Heritage | North Shore Magazine spotlight

Gloucester Public School teachers shine through the North Shore Magazine September 2017 issue with exemplary projects helped in part by one of Essex Heritage grant programs: “A Park for Every Classroom”.  Essex Heritage supports local initiatives in a big way.

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Congratulations to Gloucester Public Schools dynamite O’Maley Innovation Middle School 6th Grade teachers: Pat Hand, Mary Beth Quinn, and Jessica Haskell!

O’Maley 6th grade students collaborated with the Cape Ann Museum and a local cartographer to create maps of their diverse Gloucester neighborhoods. Part of an effort to get the entire 6th grade community to come together as they experience their first year of Middle School, the project aligned with the curricular focus on geography.  A collection of the students’ maps, called “Gloucester Through My Eyes,” is on display at the Cape Ann Museum.” 

Congratulations to Veterans Memorial Elementary School teachers Laura Smith and Mary Housman!  Their “students worked with Backyard Growers and Black Earth Composting to understand the benefits of composting, created posters and presentations to share their knowledge, implemented and monitored lunch-time cafeteria composting, and used the compost they created to enrich the soil in their school garden.” We were lucky to hear about this project during a pitch night at Awesome Gloucester.

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Farewell Reunion from 6-8PM June 7 retirement tribute for Albina Papows, Mrs. Reis, at the AMAZING Gloucester High School preschool program!

SAVE THE DATE. Farewell Reunion. Retirement tribute. June 7th. 6-8PM. Gloucester Preschool at the High School.

The unusual and innovative preschool at Gloucester High School meshes the education of Gloucester public high school students with a class of 4 year old preschoolers. These two age groups don’t usually interact. How does it work? Albina Papows, that’s how, for forty years.

Albina Papows is a visionary educator.

Along with Mrs. Papows and Mrs. Reis, there were eight to ten high school seniors selected as full-time “student teachers.” Another fifty or so high school students enrolled in 1 to 3 periods a day throughout the week. The high school student teachers were assigned to teams that alternated amazingly coordinated and extensive curriculum…weekly.

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photo: sample weekly news

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below photo: “…this was Allie’s activity. She gave us bee like toys and there were flowers, we made out of paper with bowls in the middle of the room which were filled with glitter nectar and we took the bee toys (which we had decorated) and we put glue on them and then we flew from flower to flower scooping the glitter nectar pollen from the bowls in the flower.”

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Papows designed two classrooms with an access passage between them. This clever hall is a threshold, constructed with a line of cubby lockers along one wall and an immense window along the opposite wall. The “glazing” was actually a two-way observation mirror for viewing into the preschool classroom.

photo: doorway into the cubby entrance to the preschool (Mrs. Papows leaning down to speak to each student as they head out for the day). High school students turned right to enter the high school classroom.

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The program was woven into the high school environment fluidly and effectively. The preschoolers went on “field trips” to the foreign language rooms, the auto mechanic trade rooms, and the library.  Special holidays and events were teaching opportunities and fun. On Thanksgiving, the preschool program prepared not one but three turkeys with full accompanying sides, all cooked and prepared as much ahead with the preschoolers. I am sure Mrs. Papows and Mrs. Reis needed to give up much of their predawn hours to prepare not only for the preschoolers, but for all those hungry high school students! The Gloucester H.S. Preschool teachers and student teachers volunteered their time in the community. I will never forget when they created activities and collected toys and treats for a friend of my sons, a 5 year old little boy stricken with cancer and in a hospital for years awaiting a bone marrow match. They walked at the American Cancer Society Relay for Life and to raise awareness for the “swab to save a life” bone marrow campaign that the little boy needed. Today he is thriving and cancer free.

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On weekends the high school students sent home their school projects which were serious work on their end and magical custom hand made activities and games for our kids.

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I have to thank John and Alexandra, Alexandra’s Bread, for steering my family to this incredible preschool resource.  Upon their recommendation, I made an appointment to visit the program and was immediately bowled over by seeing so many engaged and vibrant young adults–male and female– with so much energy and hope in their faces all directed at these lucky little preschoolers. I vividly recall my mother–who had a long career in education and extensive experience with teacher evaluations– putting her hands on my shoulder to grab my attention when she visited the class for the first time.

“Do you understand how remarkable it is that Mrs. Papows can switch her style back and forth each and every day teaching preschoolers and high school students like that?!  They require completely different skills, approaches and handling!” Ok maybe not ‘handling’.

Ah, no, I didn’t. Her comments did bring back my sons’ first day of school when I experienced Mrs. Papows’ quick social intelligence and observation skills.  She leaned down to study my sons, identical twins, and would not let them pass until she knew them. She did it so fast, I thought,  is she one of those super recognizer people, the ones I’ve read about that are so adept at facial recognition and reading people?

I came to believe that this impressive preschool program was so good that it was clearly a terrific opportunity for Gloucester to reveal an outstanding teaching model. Maybe it could inspire other programs or be replicated across other school systems? So I wrote letters and made phone calls to successive superintendents and principals, some contacts, and a few local and national media outlets about this hidden jewel, urging them to please, please keep Gloucester High School and this inspirational model program in mind and share it. What a great teacher story! What great high school students! At the time, national attention was focused elsewhere.  Forget the preschool and kindergarten at the 92nd Street Y and other private preschools in New York City: here was a local public school facing some economic challenges offering work at a high caliber.

When my kids went to elementary school, there were more great teachers. I thought it would be nice to have a Staff Shine box on the Gloucester Public School and city website. There would be no hesitation which teacher I would write about first.

Now my kids are at O’Maley Innovation and are learning from excellent middle school teachers. When the Honor Roll is published, the list is filled with former Gloucester High School preschool students. Thank you Gloucester preschool at the High School, all the former high school student teachers, Mrs. Reis and especially Mrs. Papows!

Please share the “Farewell Reunion” news so that former students and preschoolers can join in! SAVE THE DATE. Farewell Reunion. June 7th. 6-8PM. Gloucester Preschool at the High School.

Impact of #teachers | Heidi Wakeman, Selma Bell, Barbara Kelley reconnect at Deborah Cramer talk at Sawyer Free

Heidi Wakeman teaches Spanish at O’Maley. Selma Bell was Heidi’s first grade teacher, and Barbara Kelley was her high school Spanish teacher. Were they yours?

Have you had a chance to thank the special teacher(s) that made a difference in your life? It’s beautiful when it happens!

Heidi and Selma (this photo from Heidi)

Heidi and Selma Bell

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