Artist Loren Doucette in the news: Operations Manager at Rocky Neck Art Colony & Peabody Essex Museum special program

Peabody Essex Museum features Loren Doucette teaching pastel drawing in the garden for the museum summer 2019 July 31 and August 7th

 

Loren Doucette at Peabody Essex Museum teaching_20190614_© c ryan.jpg

 

LOREN DOUCETTE IS NEW OPERATIONS MANAGER AT ROCKY NECK

Loren.jpg

Announcement from Rocky Neck

Dear Rocky Neck Community,

The Board of Trustees is very excited to announce that art colony artist member, Loren Doucette, joined the organization as RNAC Operations Manager. In this newly formed position, Loren will co-ordinate and implement the various programs of the Art Colony, schedule and supervise the Cultural Center space, provide administrative support, and communicate with both members and the public.

Loren brings positivity, warmth and a fresh new energy to the Art Colony. She is passionate about being a creative catalyst and looks forward to promoting the artists and galleries of the Rocky Neck Art Colony, collaborating with local arts and business organizations, and helping to generate a new youthful vibrancy to the art colony.

A life-long artist who focuses on painting, drawing and collage, Loren has been an exhibiting artist and teacher on Cape Ann since 2000 and a member of the Rocky Neck Art Colony for over ten years. During this time she became widely known for her appealing style and was featured in several popular shows including those at Flatrocks Gallery and Gallery 53 in Gloucester and the Tusinski Gallery in Rockport. She was recently awarded the People’s Choice Award from the show Rocky Neck Now 2019, Looking All Around.

With a BFA in Drawing and Painting from Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, Loren was recently Interim Director of Continuing Education at Montserrat where she also taught classes in pastel, drawing and painting.

She loves living by the ocean and being a part of the Cape Ann art community. In Loren’s words: “I continually fall in love with this amazing place—the people, the culture, the diversity, the natural beauty—all truly magical. I feel honored to have this position of leadership at the Rocky Neck Cultural Center and look forward to helping bring together many talented and inspired people to exhibit, perform, and tell their stories. In addition to honoring the rich artistic history that Rocky Neck holds, I am excited to be part of the next wave of artistic innovation!”

Loren may be reached during her office hours on Thursday and Friday by email: rnac.operationsmanager@gmail.com and by phone at the Cultural Center: 978-515-7004.

Sugar Magnolia’s Breakfast for Dinner fundraiser night June 6th GHS Class 2022 |generous eats #GloucesterMA

❤️ Sugar Magnolia’s, 112 Main Street, Gloucester, MA 978 281-5310

“Brinner” – Breakfast for Dinner – perfect Fundraiser for Class of 2022

June 6th 5:30-9PM

Sugar Magnolias Gloucester MA good eggs.jpg

Michael O’Leary & friends at Jalapenos some Sundays

Around the table

Though Dog Bar and Landing are closed, you can find Michael O’Leary and friends on alternate Sundays at Jalapenos (only in America!) brought together by their love of traditional music beautifully played, sung and felt. They were at the Farm on St Patrick’s Day, and Lannon music sails.

Michael O'Leary and musicians Sundays Jalapenos Gloucester Ma_20190324_ ©catherine ryan (1)

Michael O'Leary and musicians Sundays Jalapenos Gloucester Ma_20190324_ ©catherine ryan (2)

#supermoon MARCH FULL WORM MOON RISING OVER TWIN LIGHTS ROCKPORT

Hoping to capture the Supermoon, in all its huge glory, rising between the Twin Lights last night, but the sky was pink and hazy around the horizon line. Still, I think it’s good to have a record of a rarely occurring full moon on the first day of spring.

Thacher Island Twin Lights, waiting for the Moon to rise, North Light, left; South Light right.

#supermoon MARCH SUPER FULL WORM MOON DESCENDING WITH GLOUCESTER CITY HALL

The full Worm Moon descending aligned with City Hall this morning.

On my way to give a Monarch talk in Boston this morning I caught the full Worm Moon setting. It was gorgeous and the air was perfectly still, which would have been ideal for filming. I was trying to take some footage, but my tripod wasn’t cooperating. This was the last super moon of 2019 and is extra special because today’s full super moon also coincides with the vernal equinox (also my son’s birthday!). The last time this happened was in 1905, over one hundred years ago. The next time a super moon will be seen with the spring equinox is in the year 2044.

March’s full moon has many names including Crow Moon, Eagle Moon, Sugar Moon, Sap Moon, Crust Moon, and Lenten Moon. Don’t you prefer any of these other names over Worm Moon; I especially love Eagle Moon and Sugar Moon.

TOMORROW Beer & Wine Tasting at Gloucester House for GHS Docksiders

annual spring Booster for GHS Docksiders –  Wine and Beer Tasting at The Gloucester House on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at 6:30PM.

Docksiders 2019

You can buy a ticket or donate at Alexandra’s Bread, 265 Main Street, Gloucester

Patriots hype | It’s on! MFA Boston vs the J Paul Getty 3pm today #MuseumBowl twitter showdown

Over the past few years, museums join in the Super Bowl spirit via trash talk on social media accounts. From humorous challenges and clever collection puns it’s morphed into big stake art bets for Super Bowl contenders: Some wins have triggered a museum loan from the losing city’s rival fine arts institution. Yesterday (see below) the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced a twitter showdown with the J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. Look for #MuseumBowl and @mfaboston and @GettyMuseum. It’s going down at 3pm TODAY, Friday, Feb 1, 2019. I don’t know if there’s a wager but I hope so! It’s great fun no matter what.

The MFA makes good use of their archives dog, Riley.

 

MFA Boston twitter account Museum Bowl 2019

now theyre cooking

we want the Getty famous painting Hans Hoffman Hare.jpg

Architectural plans for the Cape Ann Museum curatorial center at White Ellery property by the Babson house

Signs of clearing for the exciting Cape Ann Museum addition for a curatorial center on the White-Ellery property January 2019 Gloucester, Massachusetts

Enjoy comparing plans and photos plus a link to a higher resolution PDF of new groundscape single page from the architectural plans

cape ann museum curatorial archives center white ellery campus

 

babson house next to white ellery barn and new cape ann museum curatorial and archives center_20190127_© catherine ryan

behind and around babson clearing for cape ann museum_ new fence_20190127_© catherine ryan

today new fence and visibility (above) vs google (below) old fence & more overgrowth…there is forsythia along there

google still showing old fence and overgrowth.jpg

cape ann museum clearing for archive curatorial center _20190127_© catherine ryan
from Poplar (Babson straight back, White Ellery and Barn to the right)
from poplar side_gravel access_new sewer_cape ann museum_20190127_© catherine ryan
Poplar (gravel access)

SUPER BLOOD WOLF MOON #GLOUCESTERMA

Super Blood Wolf Moon January 20, 2019

It was way too slippery for me last night to venture very far to photograph. The above photo was taken last night from my back door kitchen stoop and there were clouds swirling across the moon, but you can still see how beautiful.

There’s something very spectacular about these January full moons. The photos below were taken last January, during the first full moon of the month, which took place on the first, and during the Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse, which took place on the 31st.

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, message about the superpower of art & culture

December 2018 looking ahead:

“We are on the front lines of a war on poverty. Not necessarily a shortage of material wealth, although its distribution in America is both a consequence and contributor to the current distress.

The poverty our field confronts every day is that which Robert Kennedy confronted while running for President in 1968. He contrasted the wealth represented in the nation’s gross national product with the wealth necessary to sustain a democracy and make life worth living. 

He said, “…the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

We are currently in one of the best economies in a generation, but studies show record declines in our sense of well-being. Worse yet, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. Major newspapers are sounding the alarm. In the Washington Post, George Will writes that loneliness, a major public health problem, is in “epidemic proportions” and that people are unhappier, more isolated and less fulfilled. David Brooks claims, in the New York Times, the biggest factor is the crisis of connection. We are “in a straight-up social catastrophe,” he writes. 
 
For nearly the last 20 years, those of us who advocate for the arts and culture have made the economy the centerpiece of our argument. We’ve collected economic impact data, counted the jobs we create and the taxes we generate, and touted our centrality to the tourism industry. We became the poster child of the creative economy. In an environment of it’s the economy stupid, these arguments won over state legislators and delivered budget increases to state arts agencies.

Five years ago, I wrote a column for a national arts blog suggesting that it was time to dial back the economic argument, even suggesting that there is something powerful about the intrinsic value of the arts. That the transforming power of culture is the power of creative expression, human engagement, and empathy. 

This is the poverty of our time. When Kennedy spoke of joy, beauty, intelligence, integrity, wit, wisdom, courage, compassion, and devotion he spoke of the ideals that are inherent in art and culture.

The arts and culture are the antidote to what ails us as a nation. In fact, they can both prevent and cure. Studies show that creative and cultural participation enhances human health and well-being leading to: reduced social isolation; opportunities for learning; calming experiences and decreased anxiety; more optimism, hope and enjoyment; increased self-esteem and sense of identity; increased inspiration and “meaning-making;” and better communication.

I can write about the studies and outcomes, but the heart is more articulate:
“It is a remarkable experience to witness a high school student watching a young adult with down’s syndrome or cerebral palsy offer a sonnet, and think to himself, ‘I want to do that. I want to have that kind of courage, that kind of conviction.’ Or to be a man or a woman of any age and watch someone you have typecast in your heart of hearts as somehow less than, stand in the center of a crowd and speak a truth about what it is like to dream of being seen for all of what you offer and know that a wall has just fallen…and through that kind of honest performance, know that you have been changed for the better,” writes Maria Sirois about Community Access to the Arts in Great Barrington, an organization that unleashes the arts in people with disabilities.

Music can help stroke victims regain their speech. You’re never too old to sing, or dance, or paint. Victims of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia find calm and clarity through the arts. Art is a universal language that bridges race, ethnicity, and culture – in a neighborhood, or across continents. The arts help explain the complexity of physics or climate change. Science and art are close cousins, sharing the bloodlines of creativity, risk taking, and problem solving.
 
Massachusetts cultural organizations are committed to serving everybody in the Commonwealth. They joined a new program this year to offer the benefits only the arts and culture can provide to people who have fallen on hard times and are receiving assistance through the state EBT card, a card that provides help to families living near the poverty level. Our organizations agreed to offer free or greatly reduced admission prices to EBT cardholders. In our first year, we tracked 220,000 EBT admissions. 

Nearly a quarter of a million doses of arts and culture to people in need. Again, the heart is in the stories. One concertgoer, who had not been able to attend a concert in years said, “It was nice to have a slice of my old life back.” Another said “It’s hard to describe the feeling of being able to do something ‘normal’ when everything else isn’t.”

The Mass Cultural Council is not an economic development agency, but when we do arts well, tourists visit and spend money, communities become destinations and better places to live, jobs are supported and created, innovators want to live here, and build new businesses.
 
The Mass Cultural Council is not an education agency, but when children have a quality experience participating in the arts, in school, and out of school, they exercise their creative minds, learn to think critically, are better observers and team players, and get a better education.

The Mass Cultural Council is not a human service agency, but when some of our most troubled youth participate in arts programs that give them a productive outlet for their fears and anger, provide a supportive community, build self-esteem and teach skills that will last a lifetime, these young people are saved from gangs, prison, drugs, even death.

In her book “Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum writes:

“Citizens cannot relate well to the complex world around them by factual knowledge and logic alone. The third ability of the citizen, closely related to the first two, is what we can call the narrative imagination. This means the ability to think what it might be like to be in the shoes of a person different from oneself, to be an intelligent reader of that person’s story, and to understand the emotions and wishes and desires that someone so placed might have.”

Martha Nussbaum is a close reader of Aristotle, who defined the good life as one that was authentically meaningfully rich: rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, great accomplishment, and enduring achievement.

George Will writes of the crumbling of America’s social infrastructure and the need for new habits of mind and heart, new practices of neighborliness. David Brooks says, “It’s not jobs, jobs, jobs anymore. It’s relationships, relationships, relationships.” Real relationships, not virtual or transactional ones. True engagement of heart and mind.

The poverty we face is one we can defeat. Novelist Alice Walker once said, “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”
 
Story. Imagination. Empathy. This is our superpower: the power of culture.” – 
Anita Walker , Executive Director, Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) 

Visit the Mass Cultural Council website

Have a podcast listen – Creative Minds Out Loud:  podcast for art and Culture –  Informative and lively conversations with arts and cultural leaders. Creative Minds Out Loud is a project of the Mass Cultural Council, and is hosted by Executive Director Anita Walker. https://creativemindsoutloud.org

 

 

New Business opens in Gloucester – Cape Ann Electric Bikes – “portable convertible”

Owner Kathy Reed opened the first and only AddMotor exclusive retail shop in the country a month ago, in the off season, in order to gear up and be fully ready for a busy 2019 rental season

Cape Ann Electric Bikes rolled into “The Commons” plaza at 214 Eastern Avenue, Gloucester, MA, in the corner space formerly occupied by The Urchin Exchange. “The Commons” shopping center is just past Pond Road and Common Crow along Rt. 127. Stores include Cake Ann and O’Neil Fitness.

Cape Ann Electric Bikes are bikes (“not scooters!”) equipped with an optional motor assist that’s set to a maximum 20mph for safe rentals.  There are many styles and options to try out. All of the bikes are fitted with fat tires to accommodate year round enjoyment, all terrain, and New England weather. Snow? Sand? Wet leaves? Check check check. Bicycles built for two? Check. There are accessory trailers for tools, coolers, pets and kids. The shop will deliver rentals to your home or business. Cape Ann Electric Bike offers free assembly for bike sales and will comp a full day’s rental towards any purchase if you want to try before buying.

Fun facts:

Cape Ann Electric Bikes will be showcasing their NEW business –and Gloucester and Cape Ann– at booths in the New England International Auto Show, host to 75,000 visitors annually and  “voted the #1 consumer show in Boston by Bis Bash Media for the last 3 years.” Stop by January 17-21.

Owner Kathy Reed grew up in Gloucester and resides in Essex. She is a Mayor’s daughter. Can you name the Mayor? She’s currently favoring that bike with the blue wheels.

Owner Kathy Reed_Cape Ann Electric Bikes_buy or rent_20181215_© c ryan (4)

 

Dogtown Books Grand Re-Opening Celebration & Sale #GloucesterMA

Dogtown Books 132 Main Street Gloucester MA_grand re-opening celebration and sale©c ryan  (3).jpg

Dogtown Books 132 Main Street Gloucester MA_goodlinens and menage gallery©c ryan

How to get Out with the Old in With the New right!

Dogtown Books Grand Re-opening Celebration & Sale on Saturday December 1, 2018, 10am-6pm, 132 Main Street Gloucester, MA. Meet and welcome new owners Lucas and Caroline, and celebrate original owner Bob

Dogtown Books Grand Re-Opening Celebration & Sale #GloucesterMA

Dogtown Books 132 Main Street Gloucester MA_grand re-opening celebration and sale©c ryan  (3).jpg

Dogtown Books 132 Main Street Gloucester MA_goodlinens and menage gallery©c ryan

How to get Out with the Old in With the New right!

Dogtown Books Grand Re-opening Celebration & Sale on Saturday December 1, 2018, 10am-6pm, 132 Main Street Gloucester, MA. Meet and welcome new owners Lucas and Caroline, and celebrate original owner Bob

First snow fell before Thanksgiving- here’s how it looked on Main Street and goodlinens studio #GloucesterMA

Main Street Gloucester, MA- First snow of the season Nov 15, 2018 

goodlinens studio useful goods and gifts for bath, kitchen and home, functional art, fine art and featured artisan panels

goodlinens studio and homegoods_20181115_©c ryan.jpg

Before Thanksgiving_First snow new lights_Main Street_ Gloucester Ma_gif_20181115_©c ryan

NEW! custom order trays– featuring local work by artists Loren Doucette and Coco Berkman– were designed by architects Ann Clark and Lena Georas and digitally printed on Baltic birch plywood, each piece of LAMOU serveware is created in Rhode Island.

 

 

Gloucester Public Schools 10th Annual Arts Festival TODAY! See the first student prints from Folly Cove Acorn press, GHS Cabinet Design celebrating 50 years, and more #greatartteachers #GloucesterMA

Gloucester Public School 10th Annual citywide arts festival held at City Hall, Sawyer Free and Cape Ann Museum May 12, 2018. Thanks to the fantastic teachers, all the parent and community volunteers that pull this beautiful event together, and the special host venues. The Arts Festival is strongly supported by the Gloucester Education Foundation.

A full program of performance and music is underway as well.

O’Maley & GHS students at City Hall | elementary schools at Cape Ann Museum | Gloucester High and elementary school at Sawyer Free

Here are some scenes from City Hall starting with  linocuts created by the first 8th grade printmaking classes to use the historic Acorn press on temporary loan from generous supporters of the Manship estate and thanks to Mayor Romeo Theken and O’Maley’s art teacher Brett Dunton. The invited special guest instructor was Mary Rhinelander.

CHARLES inaugural linocuts on historic Folly Cove press-teachers Brett Dunton Mary Rhinelander -GPS arts festival - City Hall Gloucester Ma - O'Maley school student art _May 12 2018 ©c

AVA - inaugural linocuts on historic Folly Cove press-teachers Brett Dunton Mary Rhinelander -GPS arts festival - City Hall Gloucester Ma - O'Maley school student art_May 12 2018 ©c ry

 

Fantastic display from Gloucester High School cabinet design and innovation– Celebrating 50 years!

GPS annual arts festival - City Hall Gloucester Mass - O'Maley middle school student art _May 12 2018 ©c ryan_101352 (8)

More children’s art from O’Maley classes displayed at City Hall

GPS annual arts festival - City Hall Gloucester Mass - O'Maley middle school student art _May 12 2018 ©c ryan_101352 (7).jpg

People watching whales from Cape Ann Motor Inn, Long Beach, Rocks

Cape Ann Marina guests can see whales from their rooms! Back home from work and spotted three whales immediately which means that some of the six right whales have been feeding more than ten hours HERE. It’s thrilling! I even saw one head to Salt Island and back. They check in and circle together. Two are lingering off Long Beach on the Gloucester side. When two and three are gliding along, stepped back one by one nearly together in a line, and moving fast, the legendary sea serpent stories did come to mind.

Nearly as much fun are the clusters of whale watchers at the waters edge like schooner race photos of yore. I added a short video with Long Beach cottages and the stretch of sand in the background to give another relational vantage.

Right whale watching from shores Gloucester MA_20180504_102716 ©c ryan (7)

Long Beach video to show relation to sand and seawall–they’re further out now with tide coming in

early morning post began 6:30am

Right whale watching from shores Gloucester MA©c ryan_20180504_103632.jpg

WHALES 5+ feeding between Salt Island & Long Beach visible from shore now! #GloucesterMA

Update: we spotted five or six right whales at 6:30AM just off the shore between Salt Island and Thacher. They remained feeding in the area for 11+ hours. Two crossed past the Rockport side of Long Beach, and back again. They were surprisingly fast at times! Post was updated during the day with more photos and videos. I hope some photogs with professional lens will be sharing soon.

five right whales visible from shore Gloucester MA May 4 2018©c ryan still from short video.png

30 seconds 4 right whales out of 6 off Gloucester Ma, Long Beach, Twin Lights in backgrounds

 

 

1 min video tracking 1 of 6 right whales

 

 

 

 

How close? This close: here’s another image from an FOB whales out her window!

FOB sent photo in to Good morning gloucester  whales out window IMG_8894.JPG

Is this Atlantic right whale detection app active?

Second post- close up

Third post after work– 3 whales still feeding here 11+ hours later!

https://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2018/05/04/people-watching-whales-from-cape-ann-motor-inn-long-beach-rocks/

👏👏 A Mayor that ❤️ arts: Sefatia Romeo-Theken shares Ruthanne Collinson #pocketpoem ✍️

It’s free and simple to participate in National Poem in Your Pocket Day.  From Mayor Romeo-Theken:

“I’ve selected a poem by former poet laureate, Ruthanne “Rufus” Collinson, “Jumping In”. The view from my City Hall office is the building Collinson writes about, and the poem’s span of time and special moments –celebrating kids, seniors, connections and kindness– are music to read.”- Mayor Romeo-Theken, Gloucester, MA

JUMPING IN

I was 12 years old
dreaming already
of the life within life,
writing plays and poems,
clumsy beyond description
when I arrived at Central Grammar School,
to a daily journey over the bridge,
learning about the universe of Gloucester
from my new friends,
learning art and history and language
from my new teachers.
What I will never forget
is the lesson I learned from the kind eighth grade girls
on the playground.
In elementary school, I fell down everyday at recess,
playing jump rope, trying to jump in.
My new friends at Central Grammar
taught me to look up,
to wait until the rope swung high,
to wait for the thin shimmering line
to reach its highest arc,
to enter then
and begin to keep the rhythm.
And here I am today.
The school has become a residence for the elders
and, once again,
I am learning to jump in

-RUTHANNE “RUFUS” COLLINSON

Reminder- kids poetry contest is closing soon. Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Libraray childrens services Poetry Without Paper 2018 contest And send them to the Mayor’s office– she promises to read them!

Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!

All are invited to have fun, join in, share ideas for Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary possible celebrations in 2023. A public meeting will be held at City Hall on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 1-3pm. Can’t attend? Email your input to the 400th steering committee: email gloucester400@gmail.com  and check out the 400th Anniversary Facebook page For More Info

“Although Gloucester’s 400th Anniversary is five years away, we know that those years will go by quickly.  400 years deserves a year long celebration in 2023 and a steering committee has been meeting for the last six or seven months to get the process started. Three Captains have been chosen to lead the group:  Bruce Tobey, Bob Gillis and Ruth Pino. The Committee is sponsoring a public meeting on Saturday April 28, 2018 in City Hall Auditorium…What should happen during 2023? What would you participate in? What would you miss if it didn’t happen?” 

With so much advance notice, it’s fun to ruminate. Three words come quickly to mind for one idea: Virginia Lee Burton. Burton was one of the most influential children’s book author-illustrators of the 20th century and Folly Cove textile designer and founder. She received the Caldecott medal in 1943 for The Little House. Whether for the 400th Anniversary or not, I hope one day that there are tribute commissions for Virginia Lee Burton’s beloved characters Katy from Katy and the Big Snow and Mary Ann from Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel at Stage Fort playground.  Life Story and Song of Robin Hood were also informed by landscape and her life in Gloucester. (The Burton tributes could be massive, interactive and accessible bronze sculptures. Tom Otterness commissions were completed at this scale. Why not Burton? They don’t have to be. Also bring back the monumental sea serpent and the big truck. These memorable imaginative expressions were wood in the past and maintained for years. Perhaps they could be recreated with modern decking materials. And add in Burton’s Little House! )

 

Archives

May 1923 Gloucester Daily Times covers down to the wire plans tercentenary Gloucester Mass.jpg

Gloucester has a history of producing major anniversary celebrations which makes looking back through archives* inspiring for future plans. Here are a few I’ve pulled:

*digitizing Gloucester Daily Times and Gloucester’s municipal archives is another oft repeated plea of mine and others–am sending that one along to a 400th dream wish list…

1892

Link to Gloucester’s 250th memorial celebration BOOK: https://archive.org/stream/memorialofcelebr00glou

1942

August 16, 1942– the city’s second (!) Tercentenary Celebration.

 

1923 Fighting for public art –  the Fisherman at the Wheel memorial commission

On May 21, 1923, the Gloucester Daily Times published an article about the appropriations and planning for the city’s 300th Anniversary which is remarkable in content and its late date–the celebration was just months away!  The idea itself and related costs concerning a public art commission –the one that would become Gloucester’s renowned Fisherman at the Wheel Memorial– were hammered out at a heated City Council meeting. Here’s the nearly complete transcription:

COUNCIL RECONSIDERS AND VOTES $5000 TO CELEBRATION: Equal Amount Will Be Reserved for Permanent Memorial Fund–Executive Committee Held Prolonged and Animated Session Saturday Evening. May 21, 1923 (*note ______ indicates illegible copy)

After three hours of discussion and a conference of the municipal council behind closed doors lasting about three-quarters of an hour on Saturday evening, it was voted to reconsider their action whereby the $10,000 appropriated for the anniversary committee should be alloted for a permanent memorial and voted for _____ committee to expend a sum not exceeding $5000 for the celebration, and the other $5000 to be used for the creation of a permanent memorial.

The agreement as finally reached is ______________ provide for the dedication in whole or in part of a permanent memorial to be erected and paid for jointly by the _______ city of Gloucester. “The municipal council agrees that a sum of $5000 of the amount appropriated by the city for the celebration will be for the general purposes of the committee if necessary, with the understanding that all expensea for additional police protection incurred by the  committee on public safety will be paid for by the anniversary committee. And with the further understanding that the anniversary committee will do all possible to have this sum of money applied to the permanent memorial in addition to the sum reserved ____ by the municipal _____ surplus after the celebration is over, this surplus also to be for the purpose of a permanent memorial.” The meeting opened at 8.15 o’clock, with a reading of the records by Secretary Harold H. Parsons, and following this there came without hesitation_____ ing of the celebration from those present, and for a time, one was reminded of the old town meeting days. ___________ A Piatt Andrew ___________ carnival parade by members of the art colony of the city were accepted and adopted. 

Plain Talk by Chairman Barrett-  Chairman Barrett then arose and addressed the members present and said: “I sent a communication to the municipal council some time ago to find out just what standing this celebration had with them. The letter I received was not

Continue reading “Join in planning now for #GloucesterMA 400th Anniversary in 2023!”