2019 Celebrate the Clean Harbor Swim #GloucesterMA is a two day festival this year!

 

Sarah Robbins Evans on the right with Barbara Blais watching 40th Anniversary Celebrate Clean Harbor Swim_Evans co founder both swam it many years _20180811_©c ryan Gloucester Mass
2018

From the race press: save the date — it’s  a great, family friendly spectator sport event!

“CELEBRATE THE CLEAN HARBOR OPEN WATER SWIMMING FESTIVAL will be held  August 17 and 18, 2019.

Starting off  the festival will be the  Clean Harbor Kids Swim on Saturday, a 500 meter swim along the shore of Niles Beach for 8-12 year olds. Held since 2015, this is a wonderful way to introduce kids to the sport of Open Water Swimming.

Also on Saturday will be the 1.2 Mile Celebrate the Clean Harbor Swim

NEW EVENT

For 2019, we are continuing a second day to the event, creating the festival. We will be holding the  10 mile Clean Harbor Relay event on Sunday, August 18th. This event will be held on a 1.0 mile course, very similar to Saturday’s event.  We suggest teams of 5, and swimming through the rotation two times.  Your team may have more or less than 5 swimmers. We believe the more the merrier. There will be a 6.5 hour limit. This will be a fun atmosphere, so bring a beach chair/blanket, snacks, some sunscreen and shade, and have a great time hanging out on the beach between your swims with your closest swimming friends. “

Proceeds raised target Maritime Gloucester and Fishermen Wives Club

Motif Monday: Signs of Summer Long Beach cottages

SANDY VIEW front row cottage names _Long Beach Gloucester Rockport Massachusetts_summer 2019 © c ryan

 

What’s in a name? For these front row cottages it’s the charm of Long Beach all the way. What would you use?

 

 

Compare with April 2017 see 74 Long Beach front row cottages in less than a minute  slowed down version “Coastal Living: Long Beach walk combines ocean view, front row cottages and beach” here

 

Boston Globe seashore jaunt all #GloucesterMA | Beauport Museum, Halibut Point restaurant, Virgilio’s, Bananas

Gloucester in the news again this weekend about  a great road trip. See today’s Sunday paper- Boston Globe By Linda Greenstein

Read full article  here

to see more mentions from their itinerary.

IMG_20190721_064719.jpg

 

Dore & Whittier School consolidation plans & costs heading to MSBA August 1, 2019

 

On July 18, 2019 the architectural firm, Dore & Whittier, was slated to reveal associated rough costs on new school(s) buildings– such as construction costs, swing space costs, and eligible reimbursables– with the School Building Committee. (See summary of City Council requests July 9, 2019 here.) The meetings are public. Associated costs were not transparent for the public. Instead a dollar sign rating system was illlustrated pictorially, like so:

Slide 9 comparative costs 14 options_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (11)

Why were rough estimate details cut from the presentation? A few reasons were provided, namely “MSBA does not look kindly” on public disclosure because

  • The MSBA aims to have the best possible build based on educatioal needs and goals rather than cost. Publishing amounts can taint the bidding or decision making.
  • The public may be too attached to numbers they hear and/or be confused because of the (lengthy) timeline. By the time shovels hit the dirt the final bids will be different.

Other districts post all associated costs, why not Gloucester? Why are the design/build firms awarded these contracts charged with bidding out the cost evaluations on projects, especially ones greater than 5 million?  Why assume this process is the only way to go about it?

Michele Rogers with Dore & Whittier announced that there were “no surprises” following review of the cost estimate comparisons. “Eliminations were easy; the most expensive were eliminated.” She concluded that this presentation was the second and final per their contract for services related to this Feasibility Study Phase. [This one feasibility study phase contract total cost is: $569,075  ($284,296 for the feasibility study and $275,704 for the future schematic design. One environmental study add on is $9075). Requests for a breakdown of all studies and plans related to new schools–at least since 2012– have gone unanswered by the school committee and architectural firm.]

The next step is to compile and deliver submission to the MSBA, the state agency tasked with reviewing Gloucester’s application for new schools.

Q. Next steps? “Submittal allows us to do geotechnical site evaluation and other necessary investigations (like traffic and environmental studies), and more design. Submittal helps us narrow down and leave behind areas we won’t bother with as we know…We’ll need to tighten the building design and handle specialized pieces. We’ll proceed from 9 options to 6 very quickly. ”

Q. What is the submission? “It’s a thick binder, maybe 10- inches thick, with all our reports to date, the educational program narrative, the space summaries approved earlier, etc.” Will the MSBA require a presentation? “No. The MSBA will review the binders within a two week turn around; then we have a two week turn around to respond.” Dunn commented to make sure the City see that. The MSBA will decide on November 13th or November 20th whether to make a recommendation to allow this proposal to proceed to the next phase: schematic  design. “Or they’ll push back and request more information.” The MSBA “will not require more work on many options as the scoring was so low. They’ll be concentrating on the top 3 or 4 options.”

Tom Ellis was present related to a staff change; Roger who managed the design phase is moving out of state so the team for Gloucester will need to be reorganized. They met with MSBA July 17, 2019 to discuss this change. (Was someone from the city at the meeting?) Chris Tremblay will be assisting. “MSBA doesn’t like surprises,” Ellis remarked.

Who does?

The costs and application should be public before it’s forwarded to the state. Chairman Jonathan Pope said he’d forward the pricing.

Presentation

Double click on pictures to enlarge the slides for the “East Gloucester Elementary School Building Committee 7.18.19″. Color coding continues as in yellow = East Gloucester; Blue = Vets; and Green = Green Street area.

And the winner (high scoring) is…

one location at Vets and both at Green

slide 13_scoring finalists_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (16)
slide 13- scoring on final 9 for state

 

REVISED SCHEDULE

“By October we’ll be back on schedule. Yes, MSBA has seen the schedule and is pleased.”

slide 16 _TIMELINE NOW_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (1)
slide 16 revised timeline expectations

 

Reminder! Community meeting July 25 6:30 PM

Fraternity Club Gloucester, Ma

Fraternity Club.jpg

How did we get here?

Catch up posts, documents, links related to Gloucester’s school committee new school buildings/consolidation process: Continue reading “Dore & Whittier School consolidation plans & costs heading to MSBA August 1, 2019”

New schools, big schools, small schools, where? July 25 6:30 PM Fraternity Club #GloucesterMA (Dore & Whittier costs reveal tonight 5pm)

Fraternity Club.jpgSAVE THE DATE

July 25, 2019 6:30PM

And when! “Light Up Mattos has rented the Fraternity Club, 27 Webster Street, Gloucester, MA, for a Listening Post on July 25th, 2019 at 6:30 to talk about the possibilities of a 440 student population in Mattos field area, Green Street and East Gloucester school. Together we can ask questions of each other and really see what we all think of having such a large population of students, and perhaps find new ideas, too. Please come and be heard and listen. Together we can make a difference. We will be looking for volunteers to put information flyers in neighbors doors in Mattos field area, Green Street area, West Parish area and East Gloucester area to get the word out. Proposed schools affects us all!” – Light Up Mattos

Gloucester schools | Elementary: East Gloucester, Veterans Memorial, West Parish, Beeman, and Plum Cove; Middle: O’Maley and fields; High School: GHS and fieldhouse

UPCOMING DORE & WHITTIER presentations for NEW SCHOOL(S) AND LIBRARY:

The next new school meeting is TONIGHT- July 18, 2019. Associated costs for limited options slated to be revealed. Goal for submission to the state agency, MSBA, is August 1, 2019. Meeting held in the School admin offices at Blackburn. 5pm.

Catch up on new school building process in these prior posts:

  • July 25, 2019 public community discussion all welcome! Fraternity club 6:30PM
  • July 18, 2019 Dore & Whittier slated to reveal associated rough costs on new builds/construction costs/swing space costs, and eligible reimbursables, for presentation to school committee (no public comment) 5PM
  • July 9, 2019 Dore & Whittier Presentation to City Council (no public comment) scenes (this post) and link to 1623 Studios/Cape Ann TV taping of City Council meeting July 9, 2019 here questions from city councilors following presentation begin at 27:57 minutes
School Committee Dore & Whittier presentation to full City Council July 9 2019 City Hall Kyrouz Auditorium Gloucester MA ©c ryan (6)
City Council meeting July 9, 2019 included presentation by Dore & Whittier for school committee new building options. Chair reminded audience that this meeting was not a public forum and no costs, final sites or options. There was quite a turn out.

 

Oral Communications july 9, 2019:

“Joseph S. Mattos Jr. grew up right up the street from Mattos field at 9 Linnett Place. He came from a patriotic family and chose the Army for his love of animals. Mattos field was dedicated to Joseph in 1935 and was rededicated last October 5th. the 100th. anniversary of his death.  Lt. Maxwell Parsons grew up at 65 Mt. Pleasant Ave. Lt. Maxwell served in the U.S. Army. Lt. Maxwell Parsons Playground was erected by the Gloucester Playground Commission in 1935   Ganine Nancy Doucette grew up at 19 Mt. Vernon St. The Park was dedicated in 1986 in her memory. Mr. John Gus Foote was instrumental in the dedication. Private First Class Doucette wanted to serve her country and almost could not. She died serving her country as she wished.   I am their voice as they have none. I am here today to speak for them all.   Please don’t take their dedicated open space.  Thank you. Patti Amaral”

  • Mattos family letter to the editor HERE Save-Mattos-Field 
  • July 8, 2019 GDT article by Ray Lamont announcing presentation of 9 options to City Council noting that still nothing is final and no costs or reimbursement  details will be available HERE
  • June 26, 2019 School Commitee votes to accept options 1623 Studio (Cape Ann TV) taping HERE questions begin following Dore & Whittier presentation and prior to vote at 1:05 into taping (Joel Favazza, etc,”sounding the alarm about these sites but continually told hold on calm down this is not the time to ask” and now we’re at final options no discussions. “Foreclosing opportunity (for alternatives etc) despite telling community for months there would be chance.” He mentions 12-15 months but the questions about the sites and process go back well before 2015; see selected roundup below)
  • June 20, 2019 School Building Committee votes to accept 9 options to present to school committee (no public comment) HERE 
  • June 20, 2019 Scenes and recap of new building plans presentation June 17 including full text of readings by Patti Amaral and Mary Ann Boucher  also reminder that school building committee to vote on this day for the options to push forward
  • June 17, 2019 Reminder notice of Councilor Memhard Ward meeting about new schools (open to public comments) HERE

“A round up of Pros and Cons related to the recent West Parish construction and its use and operating costs since being built might be helpful. Some West Parish feedback that made the news ranged from small inconveniences (no dishwasher) to larger concerns about design (despite ample site the gymnasium was not designed with enough space for spectators, the design of the parking lot did not take into account ease in snowplowing and numerous vehicular/traffic snafus).  There was no discussion about these proposals within a broader context of all the school properties, all the elementary schools, merging with Rockport, what happens with development of the older sites if Schoolhouse Road option is undertaken, etc.” Big built out schools haven’t demonstrated a reduction in operating costs.  The state is considering policy for livable, innovative, green and walkable communities. You can’t alter special places, build mega schools that everybody needs to drive to, and have walkable, quintessential New England neighborhoods and green communities. Can we request a modified incentive to best match our geography and green goals?

  • Spring 2019, School building committee website set up spring 2019 https://eastgloucesterbuildingproject.weebly.com.
  • October 2018 GMG post MSBA school committee school consolidation update HERE 
  • October 2017 City Begins Quest for new Merged School: Search on for funding for East Gloucester-Veterans study, Gloucester Daily Times article by Ray Lamont HERE
  • In February 2017, the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA), a state agency, moved the Gloucester school consolidation proposal further along in its funding process. The MSBA cost page is here where you will find information and data about schools built either a)2008-2013  or b) 2014-current.  West Parish is in there. (List of MSBA projects completed for Gloucester) MSBA splits out designer and project management phases from the final build which means you have to go back and forth between documents. Expected life span for new buildings is 40 years.
  • September 27, 2016, GMG post, Ward 1 Community Discussion about new elementary schools at East Gloucester Elementary School HERE
  • September 14, 2016 GMG post school consolidation meeting  at West Parish HERE
  • HERE’S A LINK TO THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PLAN PROPOSAL AUGUST 2016
  • January 2015 joint City Council/School Committee meeting; presentation by Dore & Whittier HERE Option A Maintain all four buildings as they are with same number of classes per grade; Option B Make additions and renovations at all four schools; Option C Remove Plum Cove or Veterans and make additions and renovations at other three (2-3 classes per grade); Option D Remove Plum Cove and Veterans and make addition at Beeman (4 classes per grade), with 3 classes per grade at East Gloucester

The next Sawyer Free new building meeting (also Dore & Whittier)

folds into the Trustees meeting 7/23/19 and specifically capital projects Wed 7/24/19 8:30AM.

 

 

Whales spotted from shore! Jeanne Blake photographs moments between Long Beach and Good Harbor Beach, Gloucester Mass.

photos from Jeanne Blake July 10, 2019 – whale(s) passing back and forth

 

 

Video from Cliff- whale blows (look at left of frame at 30 sec mark in the distance) and bubbles or whale footprint at center. Ten minutes prior, observers describe seeing a dramatic whale breach. They could see the whale from its back and it was so far out of the water both fins visible.

 

slick after breach or bubbles_whale blow distant right side frame_Gloucester MA.jpg

Perhaps these are the same minke whales spotted off Halibut Point July 9, 2019 mentioned in  today’s GDT here:  “On Monday, Rockport native John Parisi spotted two whales off the coast of Halibut Point on Monday while fishing with his son and his son’s friend. “We were fishing for stripers,” said Parisi. “There were a lot of porgies jumping out of the water. Then there was a huge commotion with the fish. I looked over and saw these two whales breach the ocean with their dorsal fins.” Parisi’s video here 

Mayor Theken shares art newsletter from Mass Cultural Council

Gloucester Mayor Romeo Theken shares the Massachusetts Cultural Council July 2019 newsletter. Enjoy!

mayor theken shares mcc newsletter July 2019

Through our Community Initiative, Mass Cultural Council works to support all 351 cities and towns in the Commonwealth. Over the last two years, our Cultural Compact pilot program supported a new and innovative approach to elevating arts and culture in communities.

Mass Cultural Council’s Cultural Compact pilot provided funding to create formal partnerships, via signed agreement, in six communities – Worcester, Springfield, Pittsfield, Lynn, New Bedford, and Harwich. We brought together municipal leaders, Local Cultural Councils, and Cultural Districts to work together to deepen the commitment of arts and culture in communities and strengthen relationships with those who support and create art in communities. READ MORE

Featured Festivals

Celebrate the vibrancy of our communities at these festivals – and more – throughout the season:

 

On the Podcast Engaging Diverse Artists

Listen now or read the episode transcript

Opportunities & Resources

Guidelines are available for National Endowment for the Arts’ Our Town grants. Grants support projects that integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes. Apply by Aug. 8, 2019.

Mass Cultural Council’s Festivals grants of $500 for festivals taking place from Sept. 1, 2018 – Feb 29, 2020 are now available. Applications will be reviewed on a “first-received, first-reviewed” basis. Regional diversity will be taken into consideration as part of the application review process. Apply by Sept. 16, 2019.

The next Letter of Inquiry deadline for Mass HumanitiesProject Grants is Sept. 9, 2019. Nonprofit and government organizations that serve Mass. residents are eligible to apply. Project Grants support public humanities programming in almost all formats, including lectures, reading-and-discussion series, exhibits, walking tours, film pre-production and distribution projects, teacher education projects, and out-of-school humanities enrichment programs. To commemorate the centennial of the 19th Amendment, they are prioritizing funding public programs that use the humanities to explore voting rights in America.

PolicyLink has released Working with Artists to Deepen Impact, the first in a series of briefs documenting lessons/stories from ArtPlace’s Community Development Investments.

National Endowment for the Arts’ Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design™ offers funding and technical assistance to communities with populations of 50,000 or less to address local economic and quality of life challenges through design solutions. Apply by July 22, 2019. Office hours available through Facebook on July 10, 1-2pm.

New England Foundation for the Art’s National Dance Project Travel Fund provides monetary assistance for U.S. based presenters, curatorial staff, and residency directors or for current NDP artist grantees to connect in person to explore feasibility of presenting NDP-funded works Rolling deadline.

Who’s Coming? Respectful Audience Surveying Toolkit, a new resource from OF/BY/FOR ALL, provides step-by-step tools to help you write a survey, share it with a truly random slice of your audience, and analyze the results.

In the News

Read More

Frank Numerosi FN Productions documentary short | portrait of artist Jason Burroughs – Montgomery’s Boat Yard #GloucesterMA

Frank Numerosi, FN Productions, portrait of fine artist Jason Burroughs

Jason Burroughs – Montgomery’s Boat Yard Filmed & Edited by: FN Productions (Frankie Numerosi) Jasonburroughsgallery.com

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (1)

 

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (2)

Jason Burrough paintings_3 completed_one in process_20190624_©c ryan

 

Frank Numerosi FN Productions documentary short | portrait of artist Jason Burroughs Yard #GloucesterMA

Frank Numerosi, FN Productions, portrait of fine artist Jason Burroughs coming soon

Jason Burroughs, fine artist

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (1)

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (2)

Jason Burrough paintings_3 completed_one in process_20190624_©c ryan

 

Yella on the Water – Gloucester Harbor view from the new deck

Yella on the Water joins a fantastic line up of seasonal plein air dining options in Gloucester. The inviting new outdoor space and decor of Danielle and Carlo Berdahn’s  Mediterranean bistro, Yella on the Water, in the former Morning Glory space on Western Avenue (Stacy Boulevard), beckons on any given sun day. The interior is equally alluring. Owner Danielle Berdahn enlisted some design help from Taniya Nayak and the snappy casual vibe is perfect.

Woburn native, Berdahn has a personal connection to Gloucester. She grew up spending magical summers on Wingaersheek at her family’s beach house. After hearing that fun fact, it’s easy to order the “Wingaersheek” cocktail. We had one brief hour between work and appointments to sample hand crafted appetizers (Hummus Awarma) and spirits.  Were we on vacation? A day-cation for sure, thanks to impeccable service and yummy local fare on a hot new deck with a view of Gloucester Harbor.

TONIGHT: vote to whittle new school options. Scenes and recap of new building plans presentation June 17

If you go-

Tonight’s meeting about East Gloucester/Veterans’ Memorial proposed elementary school building(s), will be held at the Gloucester Public Schools District Office Conference Room, 2 Blackburn Drive, Thursday June 20, 2019 5PM Find the agenda here 

Below are a few scenes from Gloucester’s school committee presentation by MSBA assigned designers, Dore & Whittier, and audience statements. The meeting was held at City Hall on June 17 and hosted by Ward 1 City Councilor Scott Memhard.The current status of proposed elementary school plans were reviewed. They discussed 14 options on 3 sites.

Audience members (approximately 125) were overwhelmingly opposed to the plans. People were vocal about green space, Mattos Field and memorial, women and sports, traffic, parking, transparency, consolidation, limited site options, narrow scope (what about the other schools), impact on each neighborhood, evaluation of West Parish, slow timeline, and future plans for any surplus property. Few in favor of consolidation were inclined with those proposed. One woman encouraged checking back in with the MSBA about completing multiple schools at once in lieu of consolidation and costs based on the firm’s belief that most of these options were ill suited.

Here is one statement read aloud reflecting concerns about green space and Mattos Field:

“Mattos field, East Gloucester school area, and Green Street all have the same thing in common: They are all open space and should be protected and preserved for future generations. 

Our Community Plan 2000 remind us over and over again the importance of our open spaces and the places we hold dear. The plan was “citizen-driven” and reached out to residents from all corners of our city. 

Since that plan, we are again reminded of our need and love for open space with our Open Space and Recreation Plan, a plan I was fortunate to be able to be a part of. This plan listed and inventoried all of our open spaces– from our beautiful beaches to our ball fields and parks, to our cemeteries and even our boat landings. Birds. Plants. All find a place in this plan. We talk about how we can protect these places and how we can improve them, but never did we talk about taking them away. 

Preserve, Maintain and Protect. These are the three words we should be using when it comes to our open spaces.  Because once it’s gone we can’t get it back. Thank you!”- Patti Amaral

Here is another statement pushing to reject all or nothing in favor of both/and:

“I’ve been to my share of School Committee meetings over the past several years and I’m learning more and more about what the future holds for the children of our city. There are three sites that the Building Committee has in mind for the “East Gloucester Elementary School” project. Two of those sites will take East Gloucester Elementary School out of East Gloucester.  One of those sites would eliminate the current Mattos Field and another would put the school up on Green Street, 500 yards from the old Fuller School.

The fate of East Gloucester Elementary needs your support.

I stood in front of our School Committee many years ago and asked, “Our schools are beginning to deteriorate. What are we going to do to maintain them? School Committee member, Ab Khambaty (president of the School Committee at the time) said, “Mary Ann, we do not need glorious buildings to educate children. We can teach them in a tent. What children need are teachers who have a strong desire to bring the best out in our children. We need parents who are involved with their PTO’s and staff who care.” I left that meeting very upset, because I was a young mother who wanted it all for my daughter and her fellow students, but as the years have passed I understand his message loud and clear. Our schools do not need brand new facades, grand entrances or hallways that have no educational purpose.

They do, however, need safe, clean and well maintained environments for both students and teachers (staff) alike to thrive in. It’s not the GRAND building that makes a school. It’s the PEOPLE within that structure that make a school GRAND. Can’t we provide safe, learning environments that meet the needs of today’s students, staff and neighborhoods (yes, neighborhoods) without disrupting our green spaces, without disrupting neighborhoods? Can’t we renovate our two schools for less than the cost of a new, consolidated school?

Green Street Playground and field remain green, East Gloucester Elementary remains, as well as it’s green space, Veterans’ and Mattos Field are saved and remain green. ALL dedicated green spaces that are used daily throughout the entire year, not just for school purposes, but for the purpose of enjoying the beauty of what they are and the benefits they each create. The benefits of being outside, socializing with friends, meeting new neighbors, enjoying wildlife. Are we willing to lose teachers and staff that invest in our city’s youth? If we lose a school we will lose more than just a building. We lose the most important parts of what children truly need, the people and their open fields. Take a look throughout our city and others and you will see magnificent renovations to so many of the brick structures, structures that have survived for hundreds of years, structures that have been renovated with the latest technology. We teach our children every day to recycle, repurpose and to save our earth. Let’s show them that it can be done. Can’t we provide clean, safe, learning environments while maintaining and protecting our city assets that residents of all neighborhoods and all ages love? Mary Ann Boucher,  advocate for kids, schools, green spaces and neighborhoods

The conditions pursued by the school committee are variable so it’s difficult to build or defend any consensus. In 2016, the Pines in East Gloucester was a front runner or placeholder. Opinions about consolidating multiple schools at Beeman or O’Maley were voiced but not fleshed out. In February of 2017, the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA), a state agency, moved the Gloucester school consolidation proposal further along in its funding process. In January 2019 at the school committee-city council-board of health joint meeting,  Chairman Pope mentioned exploratory conversations with Rockport about merging districts. Could the elementary and middle schools be situated on Rockport’s campus and O’Maley and GHS accomodate the middle and high school populations?   If so why would large school consolodiation buildings be underway? At the June 17th presentation, questions about other potential sites whether O’Maley, or any of the city’s school properties,  or land elsewhere, or merging with Rockport, went unanswered. Representatives from Dore & Whittier said this phase kicked off in December 2018 and was full spead ahead as of January; in truth, the process began years ago with Dore &Whittier. And new schools were a topic when my kids, now in high school, were in preschool (fantastic!) at the High School. Indeed, a generation of students has grown up and teachers retired since an “urgent” need was expressed. Conditions are urgent. Why is this process so costly and cumbersome? Why is constuction so expensive we can’t remedy in real time?

The school committee and new building sub-group welcome feedback and concerns

although they warn that in order for this process to stay on track for a new school ETA occupancy September 2023/24 they need to move forward with these options. Changes will increase cost.

See prior post with more slides of the presentation, mostly unchanged from the week before.

2019 Cape Ann Arts Alive Music & More Camp at St. John’s church Gloucester

release from St. John’s Episcopal Church:

Exciting news! The 2019 Cape Ann Music & More Camp is open for enrollment.

Cape Ann Arts Alive! Music & More

A Day Camp designed to foster pride in the rich cultural heritage of Cape Ann through music, dance, literature, drama, and art. Now in its fourth season, and in anticipation of Gloucester’s 400th anniversary in 2023, CAAA participants will learn about, visit, and perform at points of interest in the area.

For children age 5 – 15 ~ $75 per child (Scholarships are available! Mentoring opportunities for students over 13)

Monday, Aug. 19th – Friday, Aug. 23th 8:30 am – 12:30 pm

We will feature our accomplishments at a public performance at 11:15 am on our last day. Based at St. John’s Episcopal Church ~ 48 Middle Street, Gloucester

For information/registration contact: Mark Nelson, mark@stjohnsgloucester.org or 978-283-1708 ext. 2

64482466_2484214794951376_2982549011170328576_n.jpg

 

1979 time capsule – E. Raymond Abbott, former Cape Pond Ice owner and Gloucester philanthropist, on the history of Day’s pond, its waterlilies and a Rockport watershed

Next time you’re heading in the direction of Wolf Hill, Good Harbor Beach or Rockport thank E. Raymond Abbott when you pass Day’s Pond, a historic man made pond in Gloucester about 1 acre in size. In 1978 Abbott wrote about his family’s association with the pond:

stone wall repaired 2018 Day's Pond Gloucester MA_20190425_©c ryan (2)
2018 new engineered wall, railing (sidewalk pending) – read more about Gloucester DPW work here

“On reading a recent article in the Gloucester Daily Times (July 1979) which made reference to the ‘so-called’ upper Day’s Pond off Eastern Avenue it occurred to me that the people of Gloucester might be interested in a brief history of the pond.

Years ago there were two Day brothers who owned a large tract of land which extended from the beaches and marshes all the way up to the old Rockport Road. This land, including the upper Day’s Pond, was later sold to a lawyer named Webster who lived in and owned a hotel on Pleasant Street. Later on the Webster property which also included land around Cape Pond in Rockport, came up for sale at a public auction. My father, James Abbott, bought it in June of 1905 and went into business which was later known as the Cape Pond Ice Company. In 1922, my father retired and I took over the ice business. 

I will always remember a young girl, Harriet Wonson, who lived just above the upper Day’s Pond, coming to me asking if she could beautify the pond by planting water lilies in and around it. Of course, I gave my consent.

In 1943, I decided to sell the Cape Pond Ice Company. However, before doing so, I gave the upper Day’s Pond to the city of Gloucester so that the children always have a place to skate in the winter, in the summertime provide a pond for fishing, as well as a beautiful subject for our local artists to paint. It was during this same period that I was able to acquire most of the land around Cape Pond and later gave my interest to the town of Rockport to be used as a water shed. 

It is my sincere hope and desire that the upper Day’s Pond will continue to provide as much enjoyment for the children of the future as it has in the past.

E. Raymond Abbott, Gloucester Daily Times Letter to the Editor, July 16, 1979

Twenty years later, Gloucester dredged Day’s Pond “as part of a watershed management plan to stabilize the pond’s ecosystem.” Massachusetts Department of Environmental Mangement awarded $2500 for the project in 1998. Marilyn Myett wrote a persuasive My View column about the pond’s vital impact in the neighborhood.

Cape Pond Ice was the subject of Mr. Goulart scavenger history challenge for 9th grade GHS students see results & historic photos here

Long Beach seawall walkway construction continues – widening and extending path to Rockport end

In 2018 Rockport widened  much of the Long Beach seawall walkway beginning at the Gloucester side and stretching past the midpoint.  Recently crews began extending this project straight through to the end point on the Rockport side. The work is expected to be completed in a couple of weeks.

Rocky explained it’s done in segments and moving right along.

Long Beach seawall walkway widening in process_20190607_© c ryan (3)

 

Long Beach seawall walkway widening in process_20190607_© c ryan.jpg

 

 

Besides this big project, the getting ready for summer bustle is in full swing. Annual staircase return? Check! Front row cottage work? Check! New patio and masonry work by the former hotel (photos 2018 vs 2019 below) where the stone patio was compromised, various yardwork and private deck repairs are visible along the promenade.

 

Cranes, trucks, piers and parking lots! Maintenance and new construction on Stacy Blvd and Rogers St #GloucesterMa

What’s happening on Stacy Boulevard? That Department of Public Works (DPW) project involves the main interceptor sewer cleaning and inspection which is an every 7-10 year process.

At the western edge, Yella on the Water staff training took place outside on their new deck. They refurbished the parking lot and completed the accessibility ramp.

Along Rogers Street, Building Center and Gloucester House are busy with construction. A bit further down, DPW is improving the Rose Baker Senior Center parking lot, completing “just the binder for now, then on to ramps and finally top coat.”

Waterfront businesses require unusual maintenance like pier infratstructure maintenance. Gloucester House has been in business since 1958. I wonder how long the pilings last? The trio of wharf booths for special adventures there include Gloucester Boat Rental, the Thomas Lannon, & 7 Seas Whalewatch.