Tag Archives: Gloucester Ma

The End of An Era- The Winch Our Grandfather, Fathers and My Cousin I Have Used For Decades Has Been Retired

Some remembrances and photo of the old and new.  Thanks to Frank and Marty at Rose’s Marine, Corrado at B & N Fishing Gear and Billy Trafton who installs these on the regular around the waterfront

BEAUTIFUL INDUSTRY- THE WINCH

Posted on December 23, 2010 by Joey C 2 comments

I’m not gonna lie Mr Winch.  I’m not going to miss you when I finally get some vacation time.

DSC00103

Bobby Ryan Writes-

I’m not usually a romantic, nor do I usually attribute feelings to inorganic items, but…
Could it have been Capt. Joe who actually bolted that unit down? That stand had to be built. Look at it. The paint color was known as “Battleship Grey”. Everything wooden on the waterfront was “Battleship Grey”. If you owned a boat somethings were orange or green. Extra paint left from painting the mast and hull. Everything iron had a coat of Red Lead under the grey. There must be 30 coats on this winch. Usually painted on during Fiesta week when the fleet was tied up. How about that “___ head”? Is that brass? How shiny it was when new? Can you imagine how proud the “Skipper” was when he first brought up those bags of whiting knowing he made a move to be “on shore” in order to better feed and care for his family? This time of year I remember one of the last things Slug would have me do before closing up for Christmas Eve was to go over to Capt. Joe’s. I would come back with plates of food. Some cooked, some not. At the time, when it was more personal and not so en vogue, I did not fully understand about the 7 fishes, but they were delicious.
Joey, you do not need to post this, I just wanted to let you know what I see in that old winch and to let you know there are others having thoughts of your family.
Buon Natale!

THE WINCH @CAPTJOELOBSTER #GLOUCESTERMA IF YOU ONLY KNEW HOW MUCH FISH AND #LOBSTER THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT HAS OFFLOADED IN THE PAST FIFTY YEARS…

Posted on August 25, 2015 by Joey C 2 comments

#beautifulindustry The winch @CaptJoeLobster #GloucesterMA

If you only knew how much fish and #lobster this piece of equipment has offloaded in the past fifty years…

image

THE WINCH OUR GRANDFATHER,  FATHERS AND WE USE EVERY DAY @CAPTJOELOBSTER SINCE 1953.

Posted on August 31, 2016 by Joey C Leave a comment

And The New-

You can bid on 1909 Taft presidential memorabilia created for Gloucester: Canterbury Pilgrims Pageant and historic house fundraiser at Stage Fort Park welcomed thousands!

August 4, 1909, Gloucester Day brought an audience of 20,000 to Stage Fort Park in Gloucester, Massachusetts. The 1909 pageant of “The Canterbury Pilgrims” by Percy Wallace Mackaye was touted as the “greatest open air performance ever attempted in the country”.

Stage Fort Park was the magnet which attracted thousands of people at the close of the grand afternoon parade yesterday, the procession in that direction, commencing early and continuing all through the evening, until between the hours of 7 and 8 o’clock, there was a continuous mass of moving color along both sides of the boulevard, with the middle of the street almost covered with the swifter moving carriages and automobiles. This scene was most inspiring, giving one something upon which to build an imagination for the greater display to come, when the play and pageant were presented for their consideration. The vast amphitheatre, with its great stage, were soon filled, the latter by nearly 20,000 spectators, in the boxes, on the seats and in automobiles, while the wings of the latter were filled with (thousands of) players.”

William H Taft (1857 – 1930), the 27th President of the United States from 1909-13, planned to be in attendance, thanks to host, John Hays Hammond, Sr.,  his boyhood friend and college classmate at Yale. The Mayor of Gloucester at the time of the 1909 pageant was Hon. Henry H. Parsons. Artist Eric Pape (b.Oct 17, 1870 San Francisco – d.Novembre 7, 1938), Master of the Pageant, directed the Canterbury performance. He was the lead design for Gloucester’s enormous bronze plaque and granite bas-relief commemorating the Founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony set in tablet rock at Stage Fort Park and dedicated in 1907.

1909 Gloucester MA Canterbury Pilgrim Pageant Medal with PRESIDENT WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT photo

Few days left to bid! Link to more photos of the collectible and sale found here: sale on capeanntiques, ebay seller

July 30, 1909 Gloucester Day Badge – Unique Design to Commemorate Event

“The Gloucester Day badges  have arrived and are certainly worthy of the occasion. The special gold badge to be presented to the president is fo the same design as the others. It consists of a bar, backed by anchor stock, with the cables running along each side, and in the center a miniature of President Taft, flanked by the dates 1623-1909. Suspended from this bar by two chains is the embossed shield, the central figure of which is a Georges handline fisherman, riding at anchor under bare poles. On either side, clinging griffin-like to the inner circle dividing th ose parts is the inscription, “Gloucester, mass. Settled 1623. Incorporated, 1642” and beneath this is a representation of the Roger Conant house, with the word “built” on one side and the date “1623” on the other, and the inscription, “Roger Conant House,”  beneath.”

“May be worn as badges or watch fobs…Design selected after keen competition.” They were pre sold for 50 cents.

coverage about 1909 pageant Stage Fort Park Gloucester Ma

John Hays Hammond Sr with Taft family from his autobiography.jpg

John Hays Hammond Sr. 2nd row with Taft family and driver

August 4 Gloucester Day Edition detail

Pageant benefit to possibly rebuild Roger Conant House at Stage Fort Park

 

Read more

The Blackbear Barber Shop coming to 261 Main Street

New signs announcing The Blackbear Barber Shop coming to 261 Main Street, formerly Eastern Point Lit House*. *Upcoming The Lit House Book Club @ Duckworth’s Bistrot events are Gifts from the Sea on Sept 23 and 1984 on October 21.

Fish and Bear

The blackbear barber shop 261 Main Street Gloucester MA_20180909_signs storefronts ©c ryan.jpg

 

coming to 261 Main STreet Gloucester MA Sept 2018©c ryan.jpg

Rockport Fire Department responds to Long Beach cottage 🔥 fire smoke call

Area residents murmuring that the smoke is possibly due to a refrigerator electrical fire. Rockport firefighters are assessing the situation on the ground. Simultaneous scene of spectators and beachgoers

Smoke visibly rising front row cottage Long Beach Rockport Mass Gloucester_Sept 2_2018_131229©c ryan.jpg

smoke rising visible from a distance- from window of front row cottage Long Beach

 

 

Who’s the handsome opera singer that electrified the West End Gloucester Block Party? Giovanni Formisano!

Mystery musicians and tenor soared through melodies on the West End by Caffe Sicilila and Short and Main, Gloucester, Massachusetts, for the downtown block party.  I hope to add their names so I can credit the beautiful impromptu arias! Snippets of  and ‘O sole mio

*post updated September 4th thanks to Good Morning Gloucester readers! Giovanni Formisano is the mystery tenor — remember that name!- and an excerpt from New England Tenors Weekly:

A native of Torre del Greco (Naples) Italy, Tenor Giovanni Formisano, began his vocal studies in the United States. After joining the Opera Workshop at the Longy School of music in Cambridge Massachusetts, Mr. Formisano participated in various Opera programs such as the “Key West Summer Opera program” under the direction of Soprano Donna Role, the “Richard Crittenden Opera workshop” and the “New York Summer Opera Scenes” under the direction of Metropolitan Opera Conductor Joshua Greene. Mr. Formisano quickly gained recognition for his Italianate, legato and full lyric sound and was featured in roles such as Rodolfo in G.Puccini’s “La Boheme”, Alfredo in G. Verdi’s “la Traviata” , Ruggero in G.Puccini’s “La Rondine” and Cavaradossi in G. Puccini’s “Tosca”. 
Because of his upbringing in the Naples area of Italy, Mr. Formisano also specializes in the Neapolitan song style and has participated in various concerts highliting this very quality…” as highlighted in the New England Tenors Weekly

 

street ‘o sole mio

 

 

 

 

Poster annotated TBD (quite the smokescreen)

gloucester ma block party events_20180831_TBD.jpg

 

 

So Joey asked about the Parsons Street murals

 

 

Last year Joey wondered about the wall murals on Parsons (walkway between Main and Rogers) added after the 350ft’ street temporary mural.

You can listen to Joey here: GloucesterCast 243 Taped 9/25/17 Timestamped 43:38 Parson’s Street Mural

The Parsons Street wall murals were created by a lot of people including fine artists, teachers, and kids: Jason Burroughs, Laura Donworth, Kyra Moyer, Aiden Symes, Avery Mcniff, Teen Artist Guild, and Cape Ann Art Haven summer kids. One request from the building owner was that they include a reference to Gloucester’s Man at the Wheel as part of the overall composition. The long mural features iconic Gloucester architecture, history and themes (see the great whale!) . The Man at the Wheel depiction was pulled out and featured on its own; locals aware of the former owner’s affiliation with Sam Adams enjoyed the extra nod. Photos above are from 2015.

North Shore Magazine photographs of Gloucester including wall mural (from the whale end) April 2018

 

There are some Parsons Street before and 2015 in process here

 

Read more

Goetemann Artist DEBORAH REDWOOD to Construct a Large Whale’s Fluke at Ocean Alliance

News from Rocky Neck:

Goetemann Artist to Construct a Large Whale’s Fluke
Artist Talk: Tuesday, September 4, 7:00 PM
The Cultural Center at Rocky Neck, 6 Wonson Street, Gloucester, MA
Public Construction Dates: September 10 ­ 28
On the Grounds of Ocean Alliance, 32 Horton Street, Gloucester, MA
Closing Talk: Friday, September 28, 6:00 PM
On the Grounds of Ocean Alliance, 32 Horton Street Gloucester, MA

Gloucester Ma—The Goetemann Artist Residency—a program of the Rocky Neck Art Colony, Inc. that provides artists from around the world a live/work space for a month at a time—is pleased to introduce its 2018 Environmental/Installation Artist, Australian Deborah Redwood.

To be considered for the 2018 month-long residency, artists submitted a proposal responding to the mission of Ocean Alliance, RNAC’s non-profit partner, which states in part: “Ocean Alliance strives to increase public awareness of the importance of whale and ocean health through research and public education.”

Redwood is the second Goetemann resident to work at the site following last year’s installation of a seven-foot tall Great Auk by Nathan Thomas Wilson. Redwood’s practice encompasses sculpture and installation that evokes a sense of play and comments on society’s waste. She graduated from the College of Fine Arts (Sydney) in 2006 and was awarded a one-year exchange program at Alfred University, in New York.

Beginning September 10 and continuing through September 28, visitors are invited to stroll down Horton Street to observe the artist while she constructs a large whale’s fluke (part of a whale’s tail) on the grounds of Ocean Alliance, site of the former Tarr and Wonson Paint Factory at 32 Horton Street, Gloucester. Using equipment donated by J&L Welding in Gloucester, Redwood will collect scrap metal and weld it into a sculpture rising about ten feet above the water’s edge. This is a wonderful opportunity to share an artistic experience with children while making them aware of the fragility of life in our oceans. Printed information about the artist and her process will be available on site.

Deborah Redwood is the latest artist at the Goetemann Residency and the public is invited to learn more about her work when she presents an Artist Talk on Tuesday, September 4, at 7:00 PM at the Cultural Center at Rocky Neck.

For the past decade Redwood has participated in group and solo exhibitions in Australia and overseas, including; Japan, China, India and the USA.  She has also attended several artist-in-residence programs, in New York, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Vermont, Jaipur (India), Wellington (NZ), Sydney and now, Gloucester, MA. This challenging month-long project wraps up with a Closing Talk by the artist for the public at the Ocean Alliance site (weather permitting) on Friday, September 28 at 6:00 PM.

Images:

Deborah Redwood – Spiraling Shell

Deborah Redwood – Starfish at Killalea

Deborah Redwood – At Work

 

 

 

Today’s paper: Sean Horgan features Captain Joe & Sons in lobster news – Gloucester, Massachusetts throw the claw down!

“Building on the success of its Gloucester Fresh seafood branding campaign, the city of Gloucester plans to apply the same formula to help brand and market Massachusetts lobster to lobster lovers the world over. Couldn’t happen in a better place.”- Sean Horgan

Link to article in today’s Gloucester Daily Times by Sean Horgan with photos by Mike Springerand lots of lobster numbers “Gloucester hopes catch can claw its way to top: Push on to brand, market Massachusetts Lobster” 

Horgan wrote about the Seaport Economic Council  award announcements August 15th, City Wins $110,000 promote its fish, lobste “We’re really excited about the attention the program is getting,” said Sal Di Stefano, the city’s economic development director and its point man on the Gloucester Fresh campaign. “This was just a concept a few years ago and now it’s an internationally recognized brand. We’re really proud of that.”

 

Gloucester Daily Times Sean Horgan article Aug 18 2018 on lobster MA marketing campaign features Capt Joe & Sons.jpg

Taking care of seniors: 136 Eastern Ave. “Fishermen’s Home” 1911 gift of John Hays Hammond, Sr.; and 110 Prospect St. purchased by Gloucester, Mass., in 1887

House History then and now for two former ‘old age homes’:

136 Eastern Avenue (Rt 127) 1911 and today- was a retirement home for fishermen

 

 

1911, Gloucester, Mass. “WILL OPEN ON CHRISTMAS DAY Several Old Sea Toilers Will Eat Christmas Dinner There Monday: Everything is in readiness for the opening of the Fishermen’s Home, formerly the Colby House, on Eastern avenue, and on Christmas day, a gathering of aged and disabled fishermen who have toiled their best days on the banks, but are no longer able to follow this hazardous occupation, will spend one of the happiest days of their lives and eat their first dinner in the new home…It would be a rather difficult undertaking to find a happier man today than Judge York. Two years ago after a conference with Dr. John Dixwell of Boston, who becoming interested in the work raised a fund among his friends for the relief of this class of men, who without friends or home were obliged to seek shelter in the house of coreection. Judge York went to Ipswich and secured the release of eight old fishermen, who were brought to this city and cared for at boarding houses during the winter months. Last winter the work was continued through the efforts of Dr. Dixwell and Judge York, and lately, their efforts were further crowned by the splendid gift of Mr. Hammond, who presented the home. The seven men who will become inmates of the home on Christmas Day are John Ryan, Joseph Alcott, John Nichools, Harris Atwood, James Halley, Robert Fraser and Henry Gormley.” article in the Gloucester Daily Times

The prior year “J. Hammond deeded lots for indigent fishermen at Beechbrook Cemetery.”- 1910 Gloucester Archives 

After writing about his friendship with Captain Blackburn, “one of the most undaunted sailors America has ever had…I was proud to be one of the honorary pallbearers at his funeral…” John Hammond Sr. concluded his autobiography with more about Gloucester:

“I look back with the greatest pleasure on the hours I have spent with other old Gloucester fishermen. In the winter of 1910 several of these old fellow appeared before the district court and pleaded guilty to vagrancy. Without other means of gaining food or shelter, they were seeking some sort of sustenance  in the poorhouse for the winter. In Washington, I read about this in the papers and got in touch with Judge York, Dr. Dickswell, Fred Shackelford, and others who were interested. We established a home to provide for these old fishermen. I learned to appreciate the fine traits of these men who were given refuge there. Often it was exceedingly difficult to persuade them that they were too old to stand the hardships of deep-sea fishing. Their truck garden faced the sea, and from there they could watch with their telescopes for the fishing vessels as they left and entered the harbor.  Sailors, like miners, are notoriously spendthrifts and these of Gloucester were no exception. They would arrive at the Home in a destitute condition. Because they no longer went to sea, and there was no chance of their reaching the traditional sailors’ grave, they had a great dread of potter’s field. For that reason I provided a cemetery where all could be assured of decent burial. Above the gate is inscribed:

And here rest, brave toiler of the sea,
sleep undistrubed,
God’s peace be with thee. 

Many of the inmates were choosey about the location of their graves. There were two in particular, bunkies since boyhood, who quarreled daily and, I fear, nightly, but who exacted from me a promise that they might be buried side by side.”

 

110 Prospect Street ca 1900 and today – was a former retirement home for senior women

 

Huntress Home 110 Prospect Street Gloucester Mass photo credit Ben and Sally D'Antonio for PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF GLOUCESTER VOLUME 3

 

 

Gloucester bought 110 Prospect Street in 1887 for $12,000 to establish the “Huntress Home for Old Ladies of Native Birth.” I’ll write more about this one later.

Here’s how both senior housing options were described in the 1913 Gloucester Directory (from Gloucester Archives):

Gloucester archives_Gloucester Directory 1913 charity

Boston Globe comes to #GloucesterMA for a perfect weekend

“How to spend a perfect weekend in Gloucester and the other cape”, by Christopher Muther, Boston Globe. 

Boston Globe weekend article Gloucester and the other cape only Gloucester Aug 15 2018.jpg

Article describes some Gloucester highlights: Cape Ann Museum and Harrison Cady exhibition, Gloucester Beaches, Stage Fort Park, Half Moon Beach, Gloucester Shuttle, Cape Ann Cinema, Gloucester Stage, Schooner Thomas E. Lannon, Hammond Castle Museum, Perfect Storm, Wicked Tuna, Rocky Neck, Latitude 43, Lobsta Land, Zeke’s Place, Willow Rest, Beauport Hotel, Ocean Hotel at Bass Rocks, Beth Williams, and (couldn’t get a reservation at) Duckworth’s Bistro.

 

David Collins shares vintage photos of Stage Fort Ave homes near Barrett’s Camp #GloucesterMA |searching for artist Byron Brooks Part 3

In response to Searching for artist Byron Brooks (Part 1) and (Part 2), David Collins, a Good Morning Gloucester reader and amateur geneologist, was inspired to act. First he emailed a PDF family tree for artist, Byron Lloyd Brooks, and then shared vivid remembrances and vintage photographs in response to the artist’s timeline in Gloucester, Massachusetts. These are wonderful additions to filling out Brooks story and a peek into Gloucester and Stage Fort Park history. Thanks so much, David!

For a time, Brooks lived in 12 Stage Fort Avenue. Collins’ family lived in 7 Stage Fort Avenue 1940s-1960s. Does anyone know the neighbors Collins mentions or have more photographs of long gone homes and Barrett’s Camp at Stage Fort Park? I’m looking forward to scouting for that boulder.

Part 3 Searching for artist Byron Brooks – David Collins responds:

historic photo courtesy David Collins for artist Bryon Brooks research_shows Stage Fort Park Avenue ca 1940s_his sister with friend_Gloucester MASS

ca. 1950, courtesy photograph to assist with Byron Brooks research from David Collins (his sister with her friend by side entrance 12 Stage Fort Ave, Gloucester, Massachusetts )

“Hello, Catherine, Here is a little more information on the artist Byron L. Brooks, in case you are still interested. I have attached a family tree for him. It does also have some information on his two wives that I know of. I am not a professional genealogist, so don’t take the information as gospel. I grew up at what was then 7 Stage Fort Avenue (no “Park” in the address) in the late 1940s, 50s and early 60s in the house that is now 1 Anchor Lane, I believe. We moved to Connecticut in 1961 the week I turned 16. The house Byron lived in, 12 Stage Fort Avenue, was, back when I lived there, a 2-family house.  Most of the other houses in that part of the neighborhood were, or had been, summer camps. Stage Fort Avenue Y-ed at our house and both parts, one going on to one of the Park’s parking lots and the other going past us to Barrett’s Camps, were named Stage Fort Avenue. The house in front of Byron’s, the address was 10 Stage Fort Avenue back then and is now 7 Stage Fort Avenue, didn’t exist – at least not in the large form it is in now. Sam and Marion (Kerr) Johnson lived there. I think the house burned down in about 1975.

Ralph and Evelyn (DeCoste) Bradstreet lived in the downstairs part of 12 Stage Fort Avenue and several families lived upstairs over the years. Byron must have lived in the neighborhood a while before my family did. I think my folks moved to #7 about 1939 or so. I don’t know when the Bradstreets moved into #12. That said, Byron Brooks was my mother’s 2nd cousin. They share Ephraim Brooks [1818-1905] and Ruth Ward [1816-1892] of Nova Scotia as great-grandparents.

However, I had never heard of Byron until your 2nd GoodMorningGloucester article. I even collect art by people who called Cape Ann home – Charles Movalli was my best friend growing up*. I also have an extensive family tree that I have worked on for many years. Still, I had no idea Byron existed!  Of course, I had his parents in my mother’s part of our tree. I have now added information on him and his many siblings because of your articles. Thank-you! Hope this helps you, in return.” David Brooks 7/1/18

PHOTO COURTESY DAVID COLLINS_ 12 Stage Fort Avenue ca1947_razed_shared for Byron Brooks artist catalogue_Gloucester MA

photo credit: 12 Stage Fort Avenue, Gloucester, MA. ca.1947 photo courtesy David Collins

photo credit below (click to enlarge): 7 Stage Fort Avenue ca.1947-57 (L), and Stage Coach Inn vintage postcard, both images courtesy David Collins

about the photo with the girls on the rock and Stage Fort Avenue homes THEN (now gone):

“This one is of my sister and the girl (and her dog) who lived upstairs at 12 Stage Fort Avenue for several years while we lived on Stage Fort Avenue and then moved to School Street in Manchester. Her father, originally from Rockport, was a 7th cousin of Byron Brooks but I doubt he knew. The girls are sitting on a rock outside the side entrance to downstairs #12, the one the people we called Auntie Evelyn and Uncle Emerson (Ralph Emerson) Bradstreet (both cousins of each of my parents) probably used most often. It led into their kitchen. The doorway at the stairs in front (in the other picture I sent you) led into a hall, with stairs running up to the 2nd floor apartment and also a door at the left into the downstairs apartment.

The building behind the girls and to the left was, at least at one time, a Barrett camp. I think sometimes people bought them and made them more permanent homes even if they didn’t live in them year-round. The family’s name sounded like Brown-eyes but I don’t remember how it was actually spelled. Oh, I do remember: William and Irene (Douglas) Brauneis. Irene Douglas’ brother (a close friend and fishing buddy of my uncle) and his wife and family and his parents lived in the large house at the top of the hill behind the camps that was not a camp. I think the Brauneis family lived in theirs, maybe even full time eventually, long after we had moved.

The next home which looks altogether different was rented out in the summer, too, but I have no idea who lived in it. In the next camp to that one, not in the picture, a Mrs. Morrison spent the summer and her daughter and family, the Kilroys, would join her for a few weeks. Mrs. Kilroy had grown up in Gloucester. I hung around with daughter Carol and brother Robert the part of the summer when they were in town…Henry and Pauline (Osmond) Garvey and family lived in the Barrett camp that abutted our property on (what was then) Stage Fort Avenue. Great family. They would summer there from Tuckahoe, New York, but both had been brought up in Gloucester. ”- David Collins

*author’s note – more on this connection later

Byron Brooks on line catalogue (updated)

 

See amazing 1901 historic photos from Bruce Roberts: Gloucester crews worked on Haskell’s dam

City of Gloucester officials are working towards a Phase 3 for the Haskell Pond Dam reconstruction which I wrote about last week (Part 1). I included information about the original monumental build. In response, Bruce Roberts was kind enough to share these amazing photographs of the impressive crews at the Haskell Pond construction site 1901. Bonus: they were annotated by his grandfather in 1958.  West Gloucester families may recognize a surname or two, maybe a family resemblance. Please help ID if you can.

Bruce Roberts explains: “My grandfather, Edward F. Roberts, identified the individuals back in 1958.  There are some folks he didn’t recognize, since he would have been pretty young when these images were taken.  The first picture has the most identified individuals. One thing that has always been remarkable to me in the second image is how much Chester Andrews, my g-grandfather, resembled my father, Eugene Roberts, at that age.”

 HASKELL’S POND CONSTRUCTION ca.1901-02 – (Individuals ID’d by Edward Roberts in 1958)

Clearing Haskells pond late 1901 © courtesy historic photo collection Bruce Roberts

Photo 1, Dec 1901 (in snow): “Wood Choppers at Haskell’s Pond, December 1901”
Front Row, L-R: 1. Otis Lufkin, 2. Matt Poland, 3. Loren (sp?) Harris, 4. Melvin Wilkins, 5. Jim White

Back Row: 1.Asa Sargent, 2. unknown, 3. Ed Lufkin, 4. James Chadbourne, 5. Joseph Abbott, 6. unknown, 7. Joshua Roberts, 8 & 9. unknown

Clearing Haskells pond late 1901 © courtesy historic photo from collection Bruce Roberts

Photo 2 (late 1901 or early 1902):

Front, L-R: 1. Loren Harris, 2 & 3. unknown, 4. Asa Sargent

Center, w/ white shirt: Eps Walter Haskell

3rd row: (Right side, behind Asa Sargent, in light coat): Chester Andrews

(2nd to left from Chester Andrews): Fred Jeffs

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (4)

read more:

Read more

After the battle – Fife and drum parade retreat downtown

Weather held off for the big Reenactment of the 1775 Gloucester Falcon Battle, but the incoming tide kept things moving ahead of schedule. If you missed it – not to worry: 1623 Studios (Cape Ann TV) filmed the battle from Beauport Hotel, and there were drones in the air. Fantastic coverage of the event here on GMG: see Bridgette Matthews photos from event here on GMG  and Manny Simoes photos on GMG.

So as not to let the parade pass by, here’s a snippet of fife and drum retreat swinging through downtown after the battle. The officers gave them protection and compliments and timing of Cape Pond Ice truck was kismet.

 

fife and drum parade downtown After Battle of Gloucester reenactment_20180811_ Gloucester MA

Women to Women – small business donation drive for women in active duty

Roughly 20% of each branch of the Military is Women –  Woman-Owned Businesses along the Essex Coastal Scenic Byway great idea donation drive in the works on Cape Ann

women to women 2 sign

We will have the boxes in shops Labor Day Weekend  thru Columbus Day. Any money donations will go towards the shipping of the boxes overseas. We will have a pick up date also with www. operationtroopsupport.com by the end of October.

As of August 11, 2018, the following Women Owned Businesses will have the boxes in their shops:

Pauline’s Gifts Gloucester
Essex Bird Shop and Pet Supply   Essex
Sea Meadow Gifts and Garden   Essex
Olde Ipswich Shop and Gallery   Essex
Bookstore Gloucester
Cape Ann Olive Oil  Gloucester
Premier Imprints   Gloucester
Roamin’ Baths Mobile Pet Spa On The Road all over Cape Ann

 

 

Great Public Works then and now | Haskell’s Pond Dam 2018 reconstruction with 1902 construction plans & wild origin story #GloucesterMA

Last month I was fortunate to glimpse the impressive Haskell’s Pond Dam reconstruction orchestrated by Gloucester’s Department of Public Works (DPW). Protecting and managing water utilities can be easy to take for granted. “This not so sleepy dam by Rt. 128 continues to deliver almost 30% of the city’s water,” exclaimed Larry Durkin, City Environmental Engineer. He explained that years ago the DPW team began assessing the city’s water infrastructure and compliance requirements including what would happen during an event storm. Haskell’s Pond Dam needed attention: The reconstruction was projected to cost 2 million (based on the preliminary plans and the recent Babson Reservoir repair). Phase I and II  were contracted out to SumCo Eco Contracting and the estimates were correct. The project cost two million and the work is largely completed thanks to grants and loans from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs (EEA), and the Commonwealth’s Dam and Seawall Program.  DPW Director, Mike Hale, and Larry Durkin concur: “They are fabulous to work with.” Discovery was anticipated. While drilling it was determined that the Haskell Pond Dam was indeed not structurally stable, and a MAJOR fix would be required to bring the dam into compliance. The DPW team is working with the state to fund the critical work of Phase 3.

Until then, take time to enjoy its history. While checking out the 2018  progress, I pulled stories and stats from the Haskell’s Pond Dam original build In 1902. As with today, the dam work was regarded  a model project. State assistance and contracted elements were required then, too. The numerous links among these two century projects are a fascinating delve and described below. The evolving breaking news in 1902 kicked off with a bang, surprising lawsuits (next stop for one could be Supreme Court), and deft leadership. Readers and history buffs will recognize names. (Tarr ancestors were involved; were yours?)

panorama and contemporary photos – Like a mini Walden pond- Haskell’s Pond during Dam reconstruction Gloucester, MA ©c ryan July 7, 2018.  

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (1)

FAST STATS 2018 Phase 1 & 2 – $1,928,000

Scope for Phase 1 & 2: Construction of a new concrete spillway chute, concrete repairs, clearing of trees and unwanted vegetation and valve replacement at an earthen embankment dam within the City’s active water supply system, and more (A prior $175,000 grant from the state’s Dam and Seawall Program was awarded to support “engineering, permitting and the development of construction documents”  which established scope for Phase 1)

2018 July 2 Haskells Pond Dam reconstruction Gloucester Massachusetts Department of Public Works directing SumCo_ photograph ©c ryan (7)

Contractor: SumCo Eco Contracting,
Status: largely completed
Mayor: Mayor Romeo Theken
DPW Director: Mike Hale
City Environmental Engineer: Lawrence A. Durkin, P.E.
Project start (historic): 1902
Modern project start: 2013-18; RFP for Phase I issued: March 15, 2017
Total project cost: estimated to be $7 million
Funding Awarded to date: $1,925,000 

  • from State: $1,925,000 – The City has done very well with Grants and Loans from the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs (EEA), and its Dam and Seawall Program, Mike Hale and Larry Durkin concur. “They are fabulous to work with.”
No EEA Grant Loan Comment
1 Design  & permitting grant FY 2016 $175,000 Completed 6/30/16
2 Haskell Phase 1 Construction Grant FY 2017 $500,000 Closed 6/30/17 and City reimbursed
3 Haskell Phase 1 Construction Loan FY 2018 $500,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
4 Haskell Phase 2 Construction Grant FY 2018 (Applied to Phase 1 change orders) $500,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
5 Additional FY 2018 EEA, funds applied to Phase 1 change orders $250,000 Submission by DPW to EEA 7/26/18 for reimbursement
6 Haskell Phase 2 Full FY 2019 Grant, to be applied to Phase 3 $500,000 to be realized if Phase 3 goes forward in FY 2019
7 EEA Total to date $1,925,000 $500,000

Phase 3:  Some future phase was anticipated, though obviously impossible to nail down until Phase 1 & 2 were completed. The reconstruction was based on discovery put into works five or more years ago as Durkin and DPW team assessed city’s watersheds. The dam has been deemed unstable and will require a major fix to be compliant. According to Durkin, the scope for Phase 3 will include “a secant concrete wall to be drilled and concrete along the dam crest for its entire length, cored in the bedrock beneath dam for structural stability and a concrete parapet wall tied into the secant wall that provides the necessary containment for the maximum storm as defined by the state” and some exicting ancillary projects I’ll write more about in a future update. Phase 3 is estimated to cost 5 million and DPW is working on grants with the state to ensure that it happens.

Location(s): West Gloucester
Priority:  Mayor Romeo Theken’s Office-City consider water highest priority – this one continues to provide 1/3 of the city’s water

Before / After

before photos courtesy DPW ca.2014  /  after photos ©c ryan 2018

 

 

ORIGINAL 1902 PLANS AND PROPOSAL

Plate 14 West Gloucester showing Haskell's Pond_from Gloucester MA Dept Public Works archives

Reviewing the ordeal that was constructing the dam– one hundred and six years ago –is a fascinating read, and helped me appreciate the major job it’s been in 2018. The original dam construction was contentious and hence the top news story of 1902 and years prior. While researching its beginnings, I was struck by just how many areas of concern and themes of city governance from 1902 remain relevant in 2018. Here’s a short list: the financial condition of the city (“revaluation”), suitable allocations, considering work on Rogers Street, water costs, heroic solo sails, possible steel bridge over Annisquam, Burnham Field play ground, pros and cons of tourism, disagreement over what is considered sound development, new theater on Main Street, announcing state grants, eminent domain, boundary lines, Gloucester Fresh, cut bridge in bad condition, aiming to keep work in town when possible, Stage Fort Park tributes, environmentally friendly innovations,  sustainability, access and oodles of local politics-  Office of Mayor and City Council, city staff, committees, and commissions.

The excerpts below pertain to Haskell’s pond dam from 1902 Gloucester Daily Times  archives that I pulled from reels at Sawyer Free and transcribed for easy access.  Plans and maps are courtesy of Mike Hale and the Department Public Work team. Links to high resolution versions are provided at the end of the post.

January 4, 1902 – MAYOR FRENCH LOSES: Aldermen Vote to Exonerate Water Commissioners

Read more

Austin Healey Seaside summit on Cape Ann

Fun poster (note sponsor Lyon-Waugh) for the 2018 Healey Seaside Summit which has just one more day in our area. I look forward to seeing photographs of these beautiful cars zipping around our scenic shores; send some in to GMG!

poster

group from Austin Healey summit 2018 visit woman owned businesses along Essex Coastal Scenic Byway©Pauline Bresnahan.PNG

Pauline Bresnahan shares this photo and writes: “Ladies from the Austin-Healey summit travelled along our Woman Owned Business on the Essex Coastal Scenic Byway. They are now headed to Beautiful Gloucester Ma to enjoy a sail on Schooner Lannon and the Schooner Ardelle. Thanks Ladies for stopping in.”

« Older Entries