A WHALE OF A TAIL AT THE PAINT FACTORY

“Dive Deep Within” – Goetemann artist Deborah Redwood’s sculpture at the Paint Factory

Don’t you love the scale of Deborah’s piece? Much like Gloucester’s most beloved statues, the “Fishermen’s Wives Memorial,” “Man at the Wheel,” and “Joan of Arc,” “Dive Deep Within” is built to a very human scale and blends beautifully with the environment. “Dive Deep Within” is a statement, but does not try to compete with or dominate the surrounding landscape. Read more about Deborah’s piece here:

Deborah Redwood

and visit her website here: https://www.deborahredwood.com/

When I look at the subtle artistry of “Dive Deep Within,” I am reminded of the humungous abrasive metal sculpture that our community has been highly pressurized to accept, to not only find a suitable location for its installation, but to pay for its fabrication as well. One suggested site was the tiny narrow strip of green grass on the Rocky Neck causeway. When that location was wholeheartedly rejected, the next attempt was to locate the sculpture at the beautiful, but again very small, Solomon Jacob’s Park. This suggestion was especially nonsensical because the Solomon Jacob Park was specifically designed to be an open window to the working waterfront.

Monumentally large sculptures like that perhaps look best when sited in vast open spaces, a midwestern prairie or on a farm field; at a similar place where from the artist has made his home for most of his life, rather than Gloucester’s stunning waterfront.

Greatly appreciating the scale and intention of Deborah Redwood’s “Dive Deep Within”

MORGAN FAUDLS PIKE’S GREAT RED FOX CAPTURE!

Gloucester sculptor and designer Morgan Faulds Pike’s arrestingly beautiful works of art are often inspired by the wildlife and wild habitats of Cape Ann. I love her description of a Red Fox she recently spied. Go here to Morgan’s website to see a collection of her stunning sculptures, carvings for pipe organs, and drawings. And of course, you can always visit her “Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Memorial” on the boulevard.
Thanks so much to Morgan for sharing!!
Hello  Kim,
Heading home Tuesday from an early morning run around the quarries, I saw this fox cross Granite Street toward the Tool Company. She munched on something under a bush in the empty lot while crows, and later mockingbirds, harassed her. I got out of the car and watched her calmly cross at the crosswalk, then head up Curtis street on the sidewalk. A beautiful animal with ink dipped feet and ears and a white tipped fat fur tail. Sorry it’s only iPhone resolution…
Morgan Faulds Pike

Red Fox are so elusive. We used to see them all the time in East Gloucester, especially on the backshore beaches, scavenging early, early in the morning. I see them now much more frequently in West Gloucester (and Gray Fox, too) and Joey recently saw one trotting along in East Gloucester, after years of no sightings.

I read that where you have a greater concentration of Eastern Coyotes there will be fewer Red Fox. I also read that because of habitat competition from the Eastern Coyote, they are now denning closer to people’s homes as these sites are deemed safer from coyotes. Coyotes typically sleep out in the open and don’t usually make a den, unless it’s pupping season, and then they may use a fox’s den.

Walk this way: Gloucester’s stately Stacy Boulevard public works project is breathtaking and one for the ages! Part 1

This view will be changing imminently! Today’s Motif Monday is the work on the Boulevard.

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The marvelous engineering and construction for the boulevard is a HUGE story. In all the collective excitement to walk this way, let’s remember to take a moment to acknowledge this feat.

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Mike Hale, Gloucester’s Director of Public Services, was hired in July of 1999, the very same year that this ambitious boulevard infrastructure planning and funding search began for this project. It was funded in 2014.  That means the current project timeline spanned 4 Mayors, administration, staff and city councils. The construction has been exceptionally well managed and I predict it will be or should be nationally recognized with awards. I have been documenting the progress and in the coming days will post several tributes, contemporary views, historic photos and background to rev up anticipation and respect.

Coincidentally, April 16, 2017 will mark the 94th anniversary of an important piece of the boulevard’s construction.

On that day in history, Gloucester’s city council approved the purchase of two lots, the Grant and Low properties:

“Whereas it is the desire of the board of park commissioners of the city of Gloucester to take in fee by purchase or otherwise certain land in said Gloucester lying between Western Avenue and the sea,

“And whereas, the said board has estimated the expenses of acquiring the same to be $8000,

“It is hereby ordered that the sum of $8000 be and hereby is appropriated from the $90,000 Western Avenue act of 1922 to the board of park commissioners as provided by law for the purpose of acquiring and laying out as a public park such land as the said board of park commissioners consider desirable therefore, being the land as shown on a plan entitled ‘Proposed taking for highway and park purposes, Gloucester, Mass, dated April 16, 1923, John H. Griffin, City Engineer,’ having reference to that portion as shown on said plan as is proposed to be taken for park purposes.” I’ve added the bold emphasis to note the big vision of Western Avenue as a public park and extension of Stage Fort in 1923.

The significant original investment was tangible and long lasting, hallmarks of any successful public works project. Did the Boulevard improve the quality of life in Gloucester? It wasn’t easy. Houses and roads were moved.

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Photo caption: “A VIEW NOW OF THE PAST. Most of us are familiar with the Above View. it Shows the Dwellings which Once Lined the Western Avenue Waterfront Before Work was Started Constructing the New Boulevard.”

These photographs were published in August 1923 and retrieved from the Gloucester Daily Times microfiche reel at Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library.

The caption below describes Kent Circle “where grand stand has been erected for the review of the parades” for Gloucester’s tercentenary celebration. 

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Awaiting full access in 2017 is a mere blip of an inconvenience when considering how fundamental the Boulevard is for Gloucester. Its benefits are priceless.

Tomorrow’s post BRINGING PLANS TO LIFE

Prior posts

MORE EAGLE SIGHTINGS – THIS ONE SHARED BY SCULPTOR MORGAN FAULDS PIKE

Morgan writes, “All I had was the iPhone but, here it is! There were 2. Over the Mill River behind the O’Maley school. I was primed to notice them, having seen the recent shots in GMG.”eagle-gloucester

The two eagles were spotted at 4pm yesterday, Monday. Thanks so much to Morgan for sharing!

In case any of our readers do not already know this, Morgan is the sculptor who created the “Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Memorial.” For more information about the monument, visit the Filed Guide to U.S. Public Monuments and Memorials here.gloucester-fishermens-wives-memorial-sculptor-morgan-fileds-pike

 

 

They That Go Down to the Sea in Ships

Snowy morning scenes from the boulevard and Eastern Point Lighthouse.

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They that go down to the sea in ships.

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The Fisherman 's Family

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Snowy Day Eastern Point Lighthouse

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Swally Note from Morgan Faulds Pike

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Gloucester Sculptor and Gardening Friend Morgan Faulds Pike writes ~

Hi Kim,

Just read your post at GMG and thought I’d send this along since it happened today.

I went into the barn to put the broom back after sweeping the porch and I did the daily check of Swally! OMG!
Had to rush the photos because I didn’t know how much time I had.  I transferred him via his stick to the monarda. Then he flew away into the juniper hedge, perhaps to be shaded while firming up…
He was a tiny caterpillar last fall.  We fed him parsley and you advised us to let him winter in the barn.
Success!

Thanks and Cheers,

Morgan

Morgan Faulds Pike is well-known throughout Gloucester. She is the world famous sculptor who created Gloucester’s beloved Fishermen’s Wives Memorial.

full_size_clay_copyMorgan at Work on the Full-Size Clay for the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Memorial

91_owls-2Leaf-person and Owls by Morgan Faulds Pike