RESULTS Week 6 1851 | #greatteacher Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt concludes #GloucesterMA #TBT

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Gloucester, Mass.  A great teacher at Gloucester High School, Shaun Goulart, creates a local history scavenger hunt/trivia game for his 9th grade students that takes place weekly for 6 weeks.

ANSWERS TO SHAUN GOULART’S LOCAL HISTORY SCAVENGER HUNT TRIVIA WEEK SIX. THIS CHALLENGE IS THE FINAL WEEK IN THE SERIES. GO BACK HERE IF YOU WANT TO SEE WEEK 6 QUESTIONS ONLY.

The challenge Week 6 was to locate the historic map on Cape Ann Museum’s Fitz Henry Lane on Line and study it closely to comb through location prompts. This is a great family activity for all ages. It’s a bit eye spy or Where’s Waldo mixed with atlas map fun. The students were tasked with photographing the same sites as they appear today and creating a labeled presentation.

Visit CAPE ANN MUSEUM FITZ HENRY LANE ON LINE resource and scroll down to the correct map here

Map of the Towns of Gloucester and Rockport (detail of Harbor Village)
Henry Francis Walling (F. Walling)
1851
44 x 34 in.
Henry Francis Walling, Map of the Towns of Gloucester and Rockport, Essex Co. Massachusetts. Philadelphia, A. Kollner, 1851
Cape Ann Museum Library & Archive
“Map of the Towns of Gloucester and Rockport, Massachusetts. H.F. Walling, Civil Engineer. John Hanson, Publisher. 1851. Population of Gloucester in 1850 7,805. Population of Rockport in 1850 3,213.”
Map detail = segment of Harbor Village portion of map showing Lane-Winter property on Duncan’s Point.

  Question – find on 1851 historic map ANSWER- NOW (2019)
1 Duncan’s Point Maritime Gloucester / Railways (former FG Low’s & Eli F. Stacy’s whf)
2 Five Pound Island State Fish Pier
3 Front Street (present sign must be in picture) Main and Short
4 Middle Street (present sign must be in picture) Middle Street
5 High Street School Street and Proctor
6 Fort Defiance The Fort
7 Vincent’s Cove West End Main Street and Rogers section all fill / Gorton’s, Americold, etc
8 Town House Legion
9 Gloucester House Brick building corner of Washington and Main (Puritan House)
10 Two cemeteries 1)cemetery next to Amvets on Prospect 2)St. Ann’s
11 Hospital up  Granite Street veers right to Blyman
12 Town Landing Same (St. Peter’s)
13 Two bowling alleys 1)on Stacy Boulevard (see Cordage manufactury below)

2) on the Fort

14 3 schools study the map!
1)by Univ Church and Eng H& School on Church off Middle on old map
2)looks like where Central Grammar is
3)Prospect and School where apartments are now
4)corner Washington and Gould Ct.
15 Train station Roughly train platform now
16 Engine house Beyond train platform- roughly where Stop & Shop is on RR Ave
17 Canal Street Stacy Boulevard (Tavern side)
18 Cordage Manufacturing Ditto
19 Beach Street Commercial Street (behind Beauport Hotel back to water)

 

Fort Defiance the fort

Prior Posts Continue reading “RESULTS Week 6 1851 | #greatteacher Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt concludes #GloucesterMA #TBT”

RESULTS Week 5 Police | #greatteacher Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt #GloucesterMA #TBT

Gloucester, Mass.  A great teacher at Gloucester High School, Shaun Goulart, creates a local history scavenger hunt/trivia game for his 9th grade students that takes place weekly for 6 weeks. We’re taking the challenge paced one week after the students.

ANSWERS TO SHAUN GOULART’S LOCAL HISTORY SCAVENGER HUNT TRIVIA WEEK FIVE

1)What year was there an ordinance to establish a Police department in Gloucester? ANSWER: 1873 (according to the Gloucester Time Line archives book and the great Gloucester police website here : “In 1799, Isaac Elwell was appointed Inspector of Police. This was a term first used in Boston 14 years earlier to describe the men appointed to keep track of the night watchmen who patrolled the city after dark watching for fires. Constables assisted Elwell and other men who followed him as Inspector of Police until about 1847 when a petition was received by the Selectmen asking for some additional policemen to assist the Inspector of Police. Around 1850 the first night police were used. Only a few of the policemen were paid as the rest either served without compensation or were only paid for working during special occasions. In 1873, a city ordinance establishing a police department was put into effect with nine officers under the leadership of City Marshal William Cronin.”)

Gloucester Massachusetts archives timeline book_20190411_city hall_© Ray ed Sarah Dunlop © photo catherine ryan
Gloucester Massachusetts Historical Time-line 1000-1999 Mary Ray, ed. Sarah Dunlap Gloucester City Archives published in 2002. You can purchase this book from the Archives.

2)The original building used as a jail prior to 1889 was located on Rogers Block, take a picture of this area present day with a member in it. ANSWER: Main Street (harbor side) from Duncan to Porter

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Rogers block = Main Street (from Porter to Duncan) detail from 1891 Walker map

 

3)Where was the first Gloucester police station built in 1889, take a picture with a member in it at the location. ANSWER: corner of Duncan and Roger

 

 

4)Veterans of what war had a hall for them located on the third floor of the building? ANSWER: Spanish American in the police station that was built in 1899. City Hall Read about bronze veteran tribute plaques (including Spanish American) at City Hall here

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from Mr. Goulart Old Police station built in 1899 at the corner of Duncan and Roger (2019 = police parking lot)

1971/1973 newspaper clipping from Sawyer Free

June 1971August 20 1974 wrecking ball to police station

5)What year was the present day police station erected? Take a picture of it with a member in it. ANSWER: 1973

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6)Go to the exterior of the police station and take a picture with an object that would be personal to Mr. Goulart (keyword: Goulart) ANSWER: Officer Jerome G. Goulart memorial bench

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7)Take a picture with a Gloucester Police officer in uniform. Answ. How cool are these officer baseball cards!

 

“Kops-n-Kids” is a Gloucester Police Department (Official) initiative where officers visit Gloucester Schools to interact with students during recess & gym class

8)Ask the cop: What is the code word for “lunch break” over the radio. Submit the answer. ANSWER: 1093

9)For a brief time the “Old Stone Jug” served as a jail, take a picture in front of it with a member in it. What is this building known as? ANSWER: Fitz Henry Lane former house and studio 

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10) Where does the term cop come from? ANSWER: not definitive though according to snopes meaning “nab” closest: “Instead, the police-specific use of “cop” made its way into the English language in far more languid fashion. “Cop” has long existed as a verb meaning “to take or seize,” but it didn’t begin to make the linguistic shifts necessary to turn it into a casual term for “police officer” until the mid-19th century. The first example of ‘cop’ taking the meaning “to arrest” appeared in print around 1844, and the word then swiftly moved from being solely a verb for “take into police custody” to also encompassing a noun referring to the one doing the detaining. By 1846, policemen were being described as “coppers,” the ‘-er’ ending having been appended to the “arrest” form of the verb, and by 1859 “coppers” were also being called “cops,” the latter word a shortening of the former.”- snopes

 

Prior Posts Continue reading “RESULTS Week 5 Police | #greatteacher Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt #GloucesterMA #TBT”

Mary Rhinelander McCarl art exhibition at Matz Gallery

Don’t miss Mary Rhinelander McCarl’s floral still lifes on display January 2019 at the Matz Gallery, Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library.

from the printed matter:

“Mary Rhinelander McCarl- Mary, a Gloucester resident, draws her artistic inspiration from the scenery of Cape Ann. In her youth, she studied both sculpture and figure drawing with George Demetrios. She has worked under the guidance of Juni Van Dyke in the Art Room of the Rose Baker Senior Center and studied watercolors with Susie Field. At present Mary uses her training as an archivist to transcribe and edit the papers of Samuel Elwell Sawyer, Gloucester’s great philanthropist and art collector.”

Stephanie Buck: Shadowed Lives presentation at Sawyer Free

stephanie buck talk at gloucester lyceum and sawyer free public library january 2019 gloucester ma

Stephanie Buck: Shadowed Lives

Saturday January 12, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

In conjunction with the African-Americans and Maritime History Exhibit from the Massachusetts Commonwealth Museum, From Slavery to Freedom, on view in the Matz Gallery, Stephanie Buck, a local expert on Gloucester History, will share information regarding the effects of slavery on Cape Ann.

Senator Tarr on NPR and MA legislators unite

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Senator Tarr, Mayor Romeo Theken, Angela Sanfilippo, Feb 27, 2018 (Mayor Romeo Theken shared this photo)

Feb 28, 2018 – Senator Tarr’s voice came through my car radio on the way to work this morning on WGBH 89.7 “stories we’re following”.  I’ll add a link to the audio if they add it to the website. The story concerned off shore drilling and the senate resolution. Here’s the opening (you can find the complete resolution here  http://www.tarrtalk.com/). Mayor Theken shared photos, and Governor Baker’s letter of support  (see below the “read more” break)

Senator Tarr- Senate Resolution Calls for Protection of Massachusetts’ Waters

 Concerned about the potential for oil and gas drilling off of the coast of Massachusetts? Here is the text of the Senate Resolution that I sponsored with Senator Mike Barrett. The Senate adopted it unanimously. MEMORIALIZING THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TO LIMIT THE PROPOSED EXPANSION OF THE NATIONAL OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS LEASING PROGRAM AND TO PROTECT THE WATERS OFF THE COASTS OF THE COMMONWEALTH AND NEW ENGLAND. Whereas, on January 4, 2018, the United States Department of the Interior announced the publication of a draft proposed program in support of its national outer continental shelf oil and gas leasing program; and…”

In 1979,  Attorney General Francis Bellotti and Sarah Bates and Douglas Foy of Conservation Law Foundation brought suit against the government’s plan to sell oil-lease tracts on Georges Bank.

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JJ Clarke, Angela Sanfilippo, Douglas Foy-  November 24, 1981
Senator Tarr 2000 cenotaph dedication photo gloucester archives
In 2000, throwback photo of Tarr from the Gloucester archives at the dedication of the cenotaph

Continue reading “Senator Tarr on NPR and MA legislators unite”

7PM tonight | Dogtown National Heritage project kicks off at Gloucester city hall

Reminder-  Dogtown could be eligible for the National Register. A team of archaeologists began surveying and reviewing Dogtown the week of November 13. Come to a special public presentation TONIGHT – November 29th in Kyrouz Auditorium, Gloucester City Hall, 9 Dale Avenue, at 7pm.

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 Artistic practice inspired by Dogtown takes on many forms across generations and centuries. I’ve shown examples of 20th century artists and writers connected to Dogtown. Here’s a 21st century one to note: Deborah Guertze, Babson Boulders # (Courage), original small and lovely hand colored etching, ed.50. This particular impression is currently for sale at Rockport Art Association.

Oct 28 GMG post announcing tonight’s public meeting: Before Dogtown was Dogtown: archaeological survey project to be presented at City Hall November 29! Maybe hello blueberries bye bye lyme disease

“Presenters at City Hall on Nov 29th will include Betsy Friedberg from the Massachusetts Historical Commission, who will explain how the National Register program works and what it does and does not do, and Kristen Heitert from the PAL, who will present an initial plan for defining the boundaries of Dogtown as a National Register District. People attending the meeting will be asked to respond to that plan and to express their views about what makes Dogtown special. What should be the boundaries of the proposed National Register District, and what cultural features should be included in it? What would be the benefits of National Register status, and are there any drawbacks?”

43rd Senior Care Meals on Wheels fundraiser buffet breakfast at Gloucester House

Many familiar faces and organizations came together in support of Senior Care’s Meals On Wheels, and showed up early to help host a festive and delicious event. We enjoyed sharing a table with staff from Cape Ann Savings Bank,  GoldenLiving Center, and Betty and John Erikkala from Lanesville. The Valentine’s Day fundraiser buffet breakfast was pushed back to March 10 due to the winter storm. March being March it was lightly snowing when we left.

 

I missed John and Betty Erkkala’s Souvenirs of Lanesville talk at Cape Ann Museum about their new book, but noticed the pocket ornament. The book is  available at the museum shop. Our marvelous city archives were mentioned once or twice!

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Custom place mats gave thanks for the wonderful sponsors. You’ll recognize people in the photographs affiliated with these organizations and businesses.

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Legion then Legion now including photograph printed by Fred Bodin and shared by Sarah Dunlap from the Gloucester Archives

Captain Lester S. Wass American Legion Post 3 8 Washington Street, Gloucester, MA

Gloucester’s Historical Commission and the Legion are working together to plan for the building’s restoration. Sarah Dunlap, City Archivist, shared a historic image that predates the vintage postcard.

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forbes-schol

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