TREMENDOUS COASTAL WATERBIRD CONSERVATION COOPERATORS MEETING!

On Tuesday I attended the Coastal Waterbird Conservation Cooperators meeting, which took place at the Harwich Community Center on Cape Cod. The meeting is held annually to bring together people and organizations that are involved with population monitoring and conservation efforts on behalf of coastal waterbirds. Threatened and endangered species such as Least Terns, Piping Plovers, Roseate Terns, and American Oystercatchers are given the greatest attention.

I was invited by Carolyn Mostello, event organizer, to create a short film, Gloucester Plovers Go Swimming, for the “Strange and Unusual” section. The film features our three little chicks SWIMMING in the tidal creek (see next post). I also provided a group of photos of the late hatching chicks for DCR. The film and the photos were well-received, which was gratifying to me, to be of help in documenting and sharing these wonderful stories.

Conservationists from all seven Massachusetts coastal regions participated, as well as conservationists from nearby states, including representatives from Maine, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire. To name just some of the organizations presenting at the meeting-Mass Wildlife, Trustees of Reservations, Essex Greenbelt, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), Mass Audubon, and US Fish and Wildlife.

In the morning, each region gave the 2019 population census report for nesting birds as well as providing information about problems and solutions. We all share similar challenges with predation from crows and gulls, uncontrolled dogs, enforcement, and habitat loss and it was very interesting to learn about how neighboring communities are managing problems and issues.

Trustees of Reservations Coastal Ecologist Jeff Denoncour presented on behalf of the north of Boston region, of which Gloucester is a part. Essex Greenbelt’s Director of Land Stewardship Dave Rimmer and intern Fionna were in attendance as well. Both Crane Beach and Parker River are having a fantastic year and the numbers are up across Massachusetts, Maine, and Rhode Island. There are still many young chicks yet to fledge on Massachusetts beaches so the final count has not been determined.

The afternoon session was filled with outstanding lectures presented by conservation biologists and all the programs were tremendously informative.

I met Beth Howard from Mass Audubon, who has been involved with care taking the L Street Piping Plovers and Paige Hebert from Mass Wildlife who has been helping manage Roseate Terns. The DCR staff managing the shorebirds at Nahant, Salisbury, Winthrop, and Revere Beach were all there and they are just a stellar group of young people.

It was a great day! Many attendees expressed congratulations for Gloucester fledging three chicks. Last year after attending the meeting I wrote the following and it’s wonderful that our hope for Gloucester’s Plovers was realized this year: “After attending the cooperators meeting, I am more hopeful than ever that our community can come together and solve the problems that are preventing our PiPl from successfully nesting and fledging chicks. What we have going in our favor is the sheer number of amazing super volunteers along with strong community-wide support.”  

BREAKING NEWS – PIPING PLOVER NEST WITH FOUR BEAUTIFUL EGGS AND MANY THANKS TO ESSEX GREENBELT’S DAVE RIMMER AND FIONA HILL FOR INSTALLING THE WIRE EXCLOSURE!

The Piping Plovers have a nest and it is not in the parking lot! Four beautiful, perfect eggs are now being tended to by both Mama and Papa Plover on the beach, in the same general location as the 2016 and 2017 nest locations.

Early this morning, Essex Greenbelt’s Dave Rimmer, assisted by intern Fionna Hill, installed the wire exclosure that helps protect the Piping Plover eggs from canid, avian, and human disturbance and destruction.

Dave is permitted by Mass Wildlife, and is an expert in, building and installing PiPl wire exclosures. Dave and Fionna constructed the exclosure together outside the nesting area so that when they actually had to step into the nesting area to place the exclosure there was minimal disturbance to the nest. Dave noted that it only took the two of them about fifteen minutes to install the wire structure around the nest, and Papa Plover was back sitting on the nest within one minute of completion.

Gloucester’s conservation agent Adrienne Lennon was present at the onset, but had to tend to issues related to the dyke construction at Goose Cove. Dave’s new assistant, Fiona Hill, will be helping to monitor the Plovers for the summer. She grew up in Newburyport and is a a junior at UMass Amherst. Welcome to Good Harbor Beach Fiona and we look forward to working with you!

Papa feigning a broken wing in a classic diversionary display to distract predators.

So sorry the photos are very much on the pink side. I should convert the whole batch to black and white. My darling granddaughter was playing with my camera over the weekend and all the settings were messed up–the photos from the Cape Ann Museum were taken with the white balance set to underwater, and the beach photos this morning set to nine on the red scale! At least now I know how to fix it if it happens again 🙂

Papa back on the nest within a minute of exclosure installation completion.

The waze and wikipedia of bird sightings- Ebird, crowdsourcing since 2002- shows Gloucester whale watching great for birding and

The online database collaboration of Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society compiles aggregate data from engaged birders. What a staggering quantity of volunteers taking the time to share and record data!

Although Cape Ann towns are not ‘hot spots’

it’s fun to sift through the information and peek at some public competition. The top 100 birders in MA are predominantly male.  (We know Cape Ann is a birding hot spot though it may not be a recording hot spot.) There are plenty of reports from scenic North Shore sites: Cranes Beach, Plum Island, Chewbacco Woods, Coolidge Reservation, Eastern Point, and Halibut Point. Less traveled spots such as ‘Lanesville Community garden’ and local cemeteries have a diary entry feel to them and fun to peruse. Checklists indicate the distance and effort taken for any given outing, and the duration, often significant.

There are scores of reports from Gloucester whale watch trips –customers and staff. Look for ‘Stellwagen Bank’ as a listed location. I think I’d like the location column added to one default screen, and a category for whale watching.

ebird

Screenshot_073016_054904_AM

Screenshot_073016_070550_AM Screenshot_073016_064734_AM

 

Screenshot_073016_064814_AM

 

eBird: An online database of bird distribution and abundance. eBird, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Available: http://www.ebird.org. (Accessed: Date [July 30, 2016]).

Gloucester HarborWalk marker for birds/birding is located along the walkway by Gloucester House, I4C2, and Topside Grill.

Gloucester HarborWalk marker for whales is located just outside Tonno.

SEVEN SEAS WHALE WATCH +1-888-283-1776
CAPE ANN WHALE WATCH +1-800-877-5110
CAPT BILL & SONS +1-800-339-4253
YANKEE FLEET +1-978-283-0313

 

Are North Shore bird sightings published in the Boston Globe? If so Gloucester horseshoe crab, plover sandpiper somethings, red knots

I saw the BIRD SIGHTINGS call out in the Sunday Boston Globe and noted the Plum Island list. (Under ‘Miscellaneous’ there is one bird listed from Gloucester.) I have no idea if that is the MassAudubon customary geographic selection, randomly culled, or all that’s available at the time of publication. I suppose I was looking for a  ‘Gloucester’, ‘North Shore’,  or ‘Cape Ann’ heading. I am confident the region is represented because folks like Chris Leahy, Dave Rimmer, Essex Greenbelt, other experts, citizen scientists, and fans report from our communities.

*This just in update: Dave Rimmer reports that the piping plover fencing at Good Harbor came down today.

margaret mary thing002-002

GMG features many bird photographs, from FOBs and contributors especially Kim Smith and Donna Ardizzoni.  Here’s an unofficial appreciator’s list with a few Gloucester sightings: ‘sandpipers’ on Long Beach last week. Piping plover (heard/saw),’plovers’ and ‘sandpipers’ on Good Harbor beach on July 25. One (dead) horseshoe crab and 1 sand dollar (alive) off Wingaersheek on July 26. Piping Plover (heard/saw) on Good Harbor this morning. What have you seen?

20160726_133506

20160726_13345720160726_125927

Continue reading “Are North Shore bird sightings published in the Boston Globe? If so Gloucester horseshoe crab, plover sandpiper somethings, red knots”

Things To Do- Willowdale Meadow Walk Sunday July 25th

Hi Joey,
Jill Buchanan from Essex County Greenbelt here. First, I love what you are
doing with Good Mornign Gloucester- it’s the essence of building community
and communication for this special place.
And in that spirit, I’m wondering if you would be willing to somehow
communicate to your followers about a really cool event that is coming up this weekend- not happening in gloucester, but still a fun thing
for cape anners to do.
It promises to be excellent with really great trip leaders.
Thanks so much.
Jill Buchanan
Essex County Greenbelt Association
978-283-4539
djbuchanan@verizon.net

 

Sunday, July 25, 1 – 3 p.m.
Willowdale Meadow Walk
Willowdale Meadow Reservation, Topsfield
led by Ed Becker  
Come explore this Greenbelt property located at the heart of Willowdale
State Forest. Wildlife abounds here among the forest, meadow and wetland of
the 2,200 acre conservation area.
Directions: From Route 1, take the exit for Ipswich Road in Topsfield,
heading east toward Ipswich. Drive 1.75 miles. If you have reached Gravelly
Brook road, you have gone too far. Park along the fence, on the left. 

Art in the Barn- Today through Sunday

The Essex County Greenbelt is hosting Art in the Barn Today through Sunday at the Cox Reservation in Essex.  Over 150 artists displayed in three of their buildings.  This morning already was a great turn out. Beautiful pieces of jewelry, pottery, sculpture and paintings are on display.  The artists donate 50% of sales to the greenbelt.

Open Today 9:30am-4pm
Saturday  9:30am-6pm
Sunday 10:00am-4pm

Here are some pics from this morning: