WHY YOUR PHOTO OF THE ECLIPSE MAY HAVE A MINI CRESCENT-SHAPE

The simple answer is that it is a moon-shaped lens flare! The flares in your image are crescent, or ellipse, shaped because the source of light was shaped like that. Had it been an ordinary day when the sun was not obstructed by the moon, the lens flares would have been circular. A lens flare is the phenomenon where light is scattered, or flared, in a camera’s lens system, often in response to a bright light. 

The crescents in my Fujifilm camera photos are pale violet; the crescents in my iPhone photos are aqua blue-green.

GloucesterCast 238 With Israel Horovitz, Heidi Dallin, Emme Shaw, Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 8/19/17

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GloucesterCast 238 With Israel Horovitz, Heidi Dallin, Emme Shaw, Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 8/19/17

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Topics Include:
Israel Horovitz- wrote a play- The Indian Wants The Bronx that was first premiered in 1966 (51 years ago) which starred Al Pacino who was as yet undiscovered.  The play won the Obie Award for Best Play, Best Actor (Pacino), and Best Supporting Actor (Cazale).
In 1982 the Film that was at least partially filmed here in Gloucester Author! Author! written by Israel and is paraphrasing from wikipedia- ” concerns a Broadway playwright who strives to solve his family and relationship troubles while trying to get a new play into production.”  Also starring Al Pacino 12 years later.
I saw Kim’s pictures from the opening of Out of the Mouths of Babes now playing at Gloucester Stage purchase tickets here  and Israel looks so hip- What are the keys to staying young and relevant as you get older?
Tuesday Night- Israel Horovitz New Shorts Featuring Professional Boston Actors With a Mix of local Kids that work with Heidi Dallin in The Gloucester Stage Youth Acting Workshop http://gloucesterstage.com/neverdark/
Thacher Island Association Awarded a Grant for A Boat Ramp- www.thacherisland.org
Eclipse on Monday starts at 1:29PM  Still Have Special Eclipse Glasses At Sawyer Free Library
FISH PRINTER JOE HIGGINS WILL BE AT THE WATERFRONT FESTIVAL WITH SOME INSANE DEALS–  “I will have plenty of new prints small and large and t shirts for $5 instead of $25 if out come over and say hi and show me this post”

Author Deborah Cramer asks were there plentiful horseshoe crabs in Gloucester? Leads to Winslow Homer, John Bell, and Cher Ami

Deborah Cramer thanks Good Morning Gloucester for mentioning her book and asks for photographs and stories about horseshoe crabs, otherwise known as the nearly scene stealing co-stars from her inspiring book on red knots (sandpiper shorebirds), The Narrow Edge.

“I’m in the midst of a project right now trying to uncover the almost forgotten history of the whereabouts of horseshoe crabs in Gloucester.  I’ve heard some fantastic stories, like one from a man who used to go down to Lobster Cove after school and find horseshoe crabs so plentiful he could fill a dory. Do you think there’s a value to putting up a few pictures on GMG and asking people to send in their recollections of beaches, coves where they used to see them in abundance?”

We do. Please send in photos or stories if you have them about horseshoe crabs in Gloucester or the North Shore for Deborah Cramer’s project. Write in comments below and/or email cryan225@gmail.com

Here’s one data point. Look closely at this 1869 Winslow Homer painting. Can you spot the horseshoe crabs? Can you identify the rocks and beach?

Winslow Homer Rocky Coast and Gulls (manchester)
Winslow Homer, Rocky Coast and Gulls, 1869, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, installed in room #234 with so many other Homers (Fog Warning, All’s Well, Driftwood, …)
zoomed into horseshoe crabs (detail )
(zoomed into horseshoe crabs)

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While reading The Narrow Edge, and looking at Kim Smith’s Piping Plover photographs, I thought about Raid on a Sand Swallow Colony (How Many Eggs?) 1873 by Homer and how some things change while much remains the same.When my sons were little, they were thrilled with the first 1/3 or so of Swiss Family Robinson.  As taken as they were with the family’s ingenuity, adventure, and tree house–they recoiled as page after page described a gorgeous new bird, promptly shot. They wouldn’t go for disturbing eggs in a wild habitat. The title ascribed to this Homer, perhaps the eager query from the clambering youngest boy, feels timeless. Was the boys’ precarious gathering sport, study, or food? What was common practice with swallows’ eggs in the 1860s and 70s? Homer’s birds are diminutive and active, but imprecise. Homer sometimes combined place, figures, subject and themes. One thing is clear: the composition, line and shadow are primed and effective for an engraving.

 

Homer watercolor 1873

Harper’s Weekly published the image on June 13, 1875. Artists often drew directly on the edge grain of boxwood and a master engraver (Lagrade in this case) removed the wood from pencil and wash lines.

Winslow Homer

 

2016. Wingaersheek dunes and nests 140+ years later.

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Continue reading “Author Deborah Cramer asks were there plentiful horseshoe crabs in Gloucester? Leads to Winslow Homer, John Bell, and Cher Ami”