CRANE BEACH PIPING PLOVER UPDATE FROM TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS JEFF DENONCOURT

 

Trustees of Reservations ecologist Jeff Denoncour kindly shares information about the Piping Plovers at Crane Beach and he wrote two days ago with an update for us on their Piping Plover population. “Unfortunately the weather has been pretty inclement this year making it tough to monitor and really nail down the number of pairs. That mixed with an abundance of birds and a lot of loss due to storms and high tides and a bit of predation its really hard for me to get an accurate pair count right now. I am estimating that we have more than 33 plover pairs.

So far we have discovered 36 plover nests, but right now we only have 19 active nests. 3 of the 36 nests are renests, which is why I’m saying we have 33 or more pairs. Some pairs have been scraping consistently in areas but have not laid eggs.

Our first nest is due to hatch tomorrow.”

I sent him an email this morning and hopefully we’ll have news of hatchlings!

If you would like to learn more about the outstanding work of the Trustees of Reservations Shorebird Protection Program go here.

Least Tern (left) and Common Tern Crane Beach

FANTASTIC PRESENTATION BY CRANE BEACH ECOLOGIST JEFF DENONCOUR AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

Jeff Denoncour, the Trustees of Reservations Eastern Region Ecologist, gave an outstanding and informative presentation to a packed audience Saturday afternoon. Subjects included the formation and history of Crane Beach, marsh, and dunes; the seven uniquely different ecological zones; the many species of flora and fauna that comprise the rich biodiversity at Castle Island; and the Trustees protective measures managing rare and endangered species.

Since 2010, Jeff has managed the Trustees Shorebird Protection Program at Crane Beach. Because of the very excellent shorebird management at Crane Beach, 2018 was a banner year, with 42 pairs of nesting Piping Plovers and approximately one hundred PiPl chicks fledged. Our community can learn a great deal from the success at Crane Beach in how to better manage shorebirds migrating and nesting at Cape Ann beaches.

We learned from Jeff that Crane Beach is part of a string of barrier beaches formed from sediment deposited by the outflow of the Merricmack River. Salisbury Beach is at the northern end, then Plum Island, then Crane, with Coffins and Wingaersheek at the southern end. The sand that was deposited at Salisbury Beach is the coarsest; the sand at Wingaersheek the lightest and finest as it would have more easily flowed furthest away from the mouth of the river.

Excerpt from a previous post OUTSTANDING COASTAL WATERBIRD CONSERVATION COOPERATORS MEETING! talking about Jeff and the success of the Crane Beach Trustees Piping Plover

“Readers will be interested to know that our region’s Crane Beach continues to have one of their best year’s ever. Trustees of Reservations Jeff Denoncour shared information on the latest census data from 2018 and Crane Beach has a whopping 76 fledglings, with 25 more chicks still yet to fledge. Because of the huge success at Crane Beach, the northeast region, of which we are a part, has fledged a total 136 of chicks in 2018, compared to 108 in 2017, and as I said, with more fledglings still to come! The northeast region encompasses Salisbury Beach to the Boston Harbor Islands.

Jeff noted that this year they had less predation by Great Horned Owls. Because of owl predation, several years ago the Trustees gave up on the wire exclosures and now use electric fencing extensively. The Great Horned Owls learned that the Piping Plover adults were going in an out of the exclosures and began perching on the edge of the wire, picking off the adults as they were entering and exiting the exclosure.

Crane has an excellent crew of Trustees staff monitoring the Least Terns and Piping Plovers, as well as excellent enforcement by highly trained police officers. No dogs are allowed on Crane Beach during nesting season and dogs are prevented from entering at the guarded gate. As we saw from one of the graphics presented about nesting Double-crested Cormorants, when a dog runs through a nesting area, the adults leave the nest, temporarily leaving the eggs and chicks vulnerable to predation by crows, gulls, raptors, and owls.”

Jeff Denoncour and Courtney Richardson, Director of Education and Public Programs at the Cape Ann Museum

TODAY – Reminder Cape Ann Museum Crane beach talk 3pm

courtesy photo for cape ann museum_0448 © t. barrieau the trustees

photo credit: T. Barrieau/The Trustees

Courtney Richardson at the Cape Ann Museum shares information about an upcoming special event at the museum:

Lecture – Life on the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach, Saturday Jan. 19th, 3PM

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with The Trustees, is pleased to present a lecture about the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach with ecologist Jeff Denoncour. This program is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach. This program is free for Museum members, Trustees members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10. 

When one thinks of Crane Beach, the sea, sun, and sand might be the first things that come to mind. But how did the forces of nature create the stunning landscape? What’s special about this incredible barrier beach and marshlands it protects? How do The Trustees protect special places and care for our vulnerable coast? Join Jeff Denoncour, an ecologist with The Trustees, for a dive into the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach, how they protect our coastal resources, and examples of success stories resulting from their work.

Jeff Denoncour is the Eastern Region Ecologist with The Trustees where he manages and monitors ecological resources on its properties in Eastern Massachusetts. Jeff grew up on Cape Ann and has spent most of his life living along the coast. He has 11 years of experience managing rare and endangered shorebirds that nest on beaches. For the past eight years, he has been managing the Shorebird Protection Program on Crane Beach, as well as other natural resources that make the Crane Beach such a treasured place.

This program is offered in conjunction with Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach a special exhibition of the paintings of Dorothy “Doffie” Arnold.  The works on view at the Cape Ann Museum offer an ever changing vista of Crane Beach as observed across Ipswich Bay from Arnold’s studio in Bay View (Gloucester). Painted in the 1980s, these acrylics on paper are part of larger series of works by Arnold that take as their subject the intersection of water, land and light viewed from a single vantage point over a period of years. With a low horizon line, a sky that is often turbulent and waters that range from placid to racing, the paintings reflect the strong influence of nature on the artist and her work.

A 1980 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Dorothy Arnold maintained studios in Cambridge and Gloucester. While much of her work is large scale, the Crane Beach paintings measure just 11×15 inches. Her work, which includes landscapes, still lives, figure studies and abstractions, was the subject of an international retrospective in 2001–2003. It was Arnold’s wish to exhibit her art locally in an effort to strengthen the community’s appreciation of the culture and traditions of the area.

cape ann museum flyer for life on the edge the ecology of crane beach special lecture in collaboration with the trustees_during dorothy arnold exhibition jan 2019

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “TODAY – Reminder Cape Ann Museum Crane beach talk 3pm”

Cape Ann Museum & The Trustees present “Life On the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach” Jeff Denoncour lecture

courtesy photo for cape ann museum_0448 © t. barrieau the trustees

photo credit: T. Barrieau/The Trustees

Courtney Richardson at the Cape Ann Museum shares information about an upcoming special event at the museum:

Lecture – Life on the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach, Saturday Jan. 19th, 3PM

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with The Trustees, is pleased to present a lecture about the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach with ecologist Jeff Denoncour. This program is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach. This program is free for Museum members, Trustees members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10. 

When one thinks of Crane Beach, the sea, sun, and sand might be the first things that come to mind. But how did the forces of nature create the stunning landscape? What’s special about this incredible barrier beach and marshlands it protects? How do The Trustees protect special places and care for our vulnerable coast? Join Jeff Denoncour, an ecologist with The Trustees, for a dive into the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach, how they protect our coastal resources, and examples of success stories resulting from their work.

Jeff Denoncour is the Eastern Region Ecologist with The Trustees where he manages and monitors ecological resources on its properties in Eastern Massachusetts. Jeff grew up on Cape Ann and has spent most of his life living along the coast. He has 11 years of experience managing rare and endangered shorebirds that nest on beaches. For the past eight years, he has been managing the Shorebird Protection Program on Crane Beach, as well as other natural resources that make the Crane Beach such a treasured place.

This program is offered in conjunction with Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach a special exhibition of the paintings of Dorothy “Doffie” Arnold.  The works on view at the Cape Ann Museum offer an ever changing vista of Crane Beach as observed across Ipswich Bay from Arnold’s studio in Bay View (Gloucester). Painted in the 1980s, these acrylics on paper are part of larger series of works by Arnold that take as their subject the intersection of water, land and light viewed from a single vantage point over a period of years. With a low horizon line, a sky that is often turbulent and waters that range from placid to racing, the paintings reflect the strong influence of nature on the artist and her work.

A 1980 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Dorothy Arnold maintained studios in Cambridge and Gloucester. While much of her work is large scale, the Crane Beach paintings measure just 11×15 inches. Her work, which includes landscapes, still lives, figure studies and abstractions, was the subject of an international retrospective in 2001–2003. It was Arnold’s wish to exhibit her art locally in an effort to strengthen the community’s appreciation of the culture and traditions of the area.

cape ann museum flyer for life on the edge the ecology of crane beach special lecture in collaboration with the trustees_during dorothy arnold exhibition jan 2019

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum & The Trustees present “Life On the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach” Jeff Denoncour lecture”

Cape Ann Residents Enjoy FREE Admission January at Cape Ann Museum and you should see the line up of special art events!

CAPE ANN MUSEUM free admission to cape ann residents in january each year_©c ryan

Upcoming shows and special events planned for January- check out the news from Cape Ann Museum. Become a member!

January is Membership Month! Cape Ann Residents Enjoy Free Admission All Month

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (December 19, 2018) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to announce that January is Membership Month, a time when all Cape Ann residents are invited to visit the Museum and participate in programs free of charge. The goal of membership month is to show the Cape Ann community the benefits of enjoying the Museum all year!

The Cape Ann Museum tells multiple stories, all relating to a single remarkable place and during the month of January all Cape Ann residents (Rockport, Gloucester, Manchester-by-the-Sea and Essex) are welcome to enjoy its galleries for free.  From Cape Ann’s earliest days as a fishing and shipping port to its mid-19th century role in the granite industry, to its singular charms of light and sea that have attracted countless artists from the 19th century to the present, Cape Ann boasts a rich and varied culture of nationally significant historical, industrial, and artistic achievement.  If you’ve never been to the Cape Ann Museum before, now is the time. Its collections represent the history of this remarkable place, its people, its industries and especially its art and culture—we invite you to explore!

In addition to its permanent collections, the Museum offers a rotating schedule of special exhibitions throughout the year as well as related programs and events for adults and families. This is a wonderful opportunity to visit (or revisit) the current special exhibition, The Little House: Her Story which celebrates the 75th anniversary of the publication of the Little House, written and illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton and the newly opened exhibition Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads, award-winning children’s books by local artists and writers inspired by the 2017 Cape Ann Reads original picture book competition. Also on display are the paintings of Crane Beach by Dorothy Arnold in the special exhibition Sky, Horizon, Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach.

Whether you are looking to spend a quiet day of contemplation after the busy holiday season, wishing to share a bit of your home town with guests or have lived here for years but just never visited, the Cape Ann Museum welcomes you for a visit celebrating you and this wonderful place in which you chose to live.

In addition to free admission, the Museum has lined up a full schedule of programming for visitors to enjoy:

Wednesdays from 4:00 p.m. to 4:30 p..m.
Story Time in the Gallery

Young visitors are invited to join CAM staff and special guests for story time in the gallery. Offered in conjunction with The Little House: Her Story and Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads. Free and open to the public. Museum closes at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, January 5 at 10:30 a.m.
Winter Shorts Gallery Tours

Join CAM docents for three 20-minute themed mini tours. Topics include: artists who captured similar subjects; provocative portraits; and Virginia Lee Burton as teacher. Free for Museum Members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations recommended and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

Saturday, January 5 from 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.  
Opening Reception – Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads

Join us for a celebration of the award-winning children’s book authors and illustrators inspired by the 2017 Cape Ann Reads original picture book competition. Free for Museum members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission.

Wednesday, January 9, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Appraisal Night with Brattle Book Shop’s Ken Gloss

Join Antiques Road Show veteran Ken Gloss for a closer look at antique books and manuscripts, with special emphasis on children’s literature. Offered in conjunction with The Little House: Her Story. Free for Museum members and Cape Ann residents; $10 nonmembers/nonresidents. Reservations required and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

Thursday, January 10 at 10:30 a.m.
Young at Art: At the Beach

Toddlers and caregivers are invited to take a closer look at Sky, Horizon, Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach

Free for CAM members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Space is limited. Reservations required. For more information or to make a reservation, please call 978-238-0455 x12 or email sarahflanagan@capeannmuseum.org.

Saturday, January 12 from 10:00 – 12:00 p.m.
CAMKids Second Saturdays: Cape Ann Reads

Explore the inventive worlds of children’s book illustrators in the Cape Ann Reads exhibition then create your own storybook in the Activity Center. This program is free and open to the public. For more information or to make a reservation, please call 978-283-0455 x16 or email sarahflanagan@capeannmuseum.org.

Saturday, January 12 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Blockprinting Demonstration

Drop by to see blockprinting in action with artist Mary Rhinelander. Offered in conjunction with The Little House: Her Story. Free for Museum members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission.

Friday, January 18 from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Surveying the Collections: Historic Quilts

On select Fridays through April, the public is invited to observe CAM curatorial staff as they survey the collection. Join us for one session or all four to gain a better understanding of the Museum’s holdings. Free for Museum members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission.

Saturday, January 19 at 10:30 a.m.
Winter Shorts Gallery Tours

Join CAM docents for three 20-minute themed mini tours. Topics include: practical art objects; cloud paintings; and artwork in the Captain Elias Davis House. Free for Museum Members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations recommended and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

Saturday, January 19 at 3:00 p.m.
Perspectives on Crane Beach Ecology

Join Trustees’ coastal ecologist Jeff Denoncour for an overview of Crane Beach. Offered in conjunction with Sky, Horizon, Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach. Free for Museum members and Cape Ann residents; $10 nonmembers/nonresidents. Reservations required and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

Saturday, January 26 at 10:30 a.m.
Winter Shorts Gallery Tours

Join CAM docents for three 20-minute themed mini tours. Topics include: Cape Ann granite; the year 1804; and I spy. Free for CAM Members and Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations recommended and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

Saturday, January 26 at 1:00 p.m.
Family Tour

Enjoy an animated family tour of the Museum to explore paintings, sculptures and maritime objects. Created for children ages 3 – 12 with a caregiver. This 30-minute tour ends in the Activity Center for art projects and play. Free for CAM members or with Museum admission. Reservations required. For more information or to make a reservation, please call 978-283-0455 x16 or email sarahflanagan@capeannmuseum.org. 

Saturday, January 26 at 1:00 p.m.
A Conversation with the Curators

Gallery A4 Chief Curator Michiyo Okabe and Atsuko Tanaka join CAM Curator Martha Oaks to discuss the cultural collaboration behind The Little House: Her Story. Free for Museum members and Cape Ann residents; $10 nonmembers/nonresidents. Reservations required and can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com.

 

About the Cape Ann Museum

The Cape Ann Museum has been in existence since the 1870s, working to preserve and celebrate the history and culture of the area and to keep it relevant to today’s audiences. Spanning 44,000 square feet, the Museum is one of the major cultural institutions on Boston’s North Shore welcoming more than 25,000 local, national and international visitors each year to its exhibitions and programs. In addition to fine art, the Museum’s collections include decorative art, textiles, artifacts from the maritime and granite industries, two historic homes and a sculpture park in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Visit capeannmuseum.org for details.

The Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $12.00 adults, $10.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. For more information please call: (978)283-0455 x10. Additional information can be found online at http://www.capeannmuseum.org.

 

 

OUTSTANDING COASTAL WATERBIRD CONSERVATION COOPERATORS MEETING!

Piping Plover Chick Lift-off! – Not quite ready to fly yet, but testing his wings and airborne for a few seconds.

On Tuesday this past week my friend Deborah and I attended the Coastal Waterbird Conservation Cooperators meeting, which took place at Cape Cod Community College in Barnstable. The meeting is held annually to bring together people and organizations that are involved with population monitoring and conservation efforts on behalf of coastal waterbirds. Threatened and endangered species such as Least Terns, Piping Plovers, and American Oystercatchers are given the greatest attention, while the meeting also encompasses efforts on behalf of heron, cormorant, and egret species.

American Oystercatchers

Conservationists from all seven Massachusetts coastal regions participated, as well as conservationists from nearby states, including representatives from New Jersey, Maine, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire. To name just some of the organizations presenting at the meeting-Mass Wildlife, Trustees of Reservations, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), and US Fish and Wildlife. Gloucester was well represented. In addition to Deborah and myself, two members of the Animal Advisory Committee also attended; chairperson Alicia Pensarosa and former animal control officer Diane Corliss. Many of you may remember our Mass Wildlife Piping Plover intern Jasmine. She was there to give a presentation on habitat vegetation utilized by nesting Piping Plovers. Her aunt, Gloucester’s Terry Weber, was there to support Jasmine. This was Jasmine’s first time speaking in public and she did an excellent job!

Each region gave the 2018 population census report for nesting birds as well as providing information about problems and solutions. We all share similar challenges with predation from crows and gulls, uncontrolled dogs, enforcement, and habitat loss and it was very interesting to learn about how neighboring communities are managing problems and issues.

Just one highlight of a day filled with helpful insights and useful information is that we can be very proud of our state—Massachusetts is at the leading edge of the Piping Plover recovery effort. The representative from New Jersey was there specifically to learn from Massachusetts conservationists on how they could possibly improve their recovery program as the New Jersey PiPl population is not growing, with fewer and fewer each year retuning to nest. As you can see from the graph provided at the meeting, the Canadian recovery is going very poorly as well.

Readers will be interested to know that our region’s Crane Beach continues to have one of their best year’s ever. Trustees of Reservations Jeff Denoncour shared information on the latest census data from 2018 and Crane’s has a whopping 76 fledglings, with 25 more chicks still yet to fledge. Because of the huge success at Cranes Beach, the northeast region, of which we are a part, has fledged a total 136 of chicks in 2018, compared to 108 in 2017, and as I said, with more fledglings still to come! The northeast region encompasses Salisbury Beach to the Boston Harbor Islands.

Jeff noted that this year they had less predation by Great Horned Owls. Because of owl predation, several years ago Crane Beach gave up on the wire exclosures and now use electric fencing extensively. The Great Horned Owls learned that the Piping Plover adults were going in an out of the exclosures and began perching on the edge of the wire, picking off the adults as they were entering and exiting the exclosure.

Crane has an excellent crew of Trustees staff monitoring the Least Terns and Piping Plovers, as well as excellent enforcement by highly trained police officers. No dogs are allowed on Crane Beach during nesting season and dogs are prevented from entering at the guarded gate. As we saw from one of the graphics presented about nesting Double-crested Cormorants, when a dog runs through a nesting area, the adults leave the nest, temporarily leaving the eggs and chicks vulnerable to predation by crows, gulls, raptors, and owls.

Crane Beach Least Tern fledgling.

Compare the Least Tern to Common Tern in the above photo. It’s easy to see why the birds are called Least Terns; they are North America’s smallest member of the tern and gull family (Crane Beach).

Another interesting bit of information shared–if you listen to our podcasts, back in April, we talked about the potential dilemma of what would happen if Snowy Owls remained on the beaches as the Piping Plovers returned from their winter grounds. Knowing that Snowy Owls (Bubo scandiacus) and Great Horned Owls (Bubo virginianus) are close cousins and that the Great Horned Owl eats Piping Plover chicks and adults, I was concerned that a Snowy might eat our PiPl. At one particular beach on Cape Cod, a Snowy stayed through mid-July. An adult Piping Plover skull was found in the owl’s pellet.

Snowy Owls remained in Massachusetts this year through July.

After attending the cooperators meeting, I am more hopeful than ever that our community can come together and solve the problems that are preventing our PiPl from successfully nesting and fledging chicks. What we have going in our favor is the sheer number of amazing super volunteers along with strong community-wide support.  

Piping Plover fully fledged and flying up and down the beach – we”ll have these next year!

2015 Crane Beach Parking Permit Stickers on Sale

Hi Joey,

It’s hard to believe we’re thinking about beach season, but it’s nice to have something to look forward to! That said, while I know Gloucester residents have Good Harbor beach to enjoy, I thought I would share the below release announcing Crane Beach Parking Stickers are now on sale for the year. Hope you are well and, as always, thanks for your consideration!

Best,

Holly Hannaway

The Trustees of Reservations Announce

2015 Crane Beach Parking Permit Stickers on Sale

Beach Sticker Program Offers Significant Savings on Year-Round Visits

to One of the Northeast’s Most Beautiful Beaches

download

The Trustees of Reservations (The Trustees) announced today that Crane Beach Parking Permits are for sale online. Purchasing a 2015–2016 Crane Beach Parking Permit sticker will allow Trustees’ members to park at Crane Beach for no additional charge, offering a significant savings for frequent beach visitors. The cost of the sticker for Trustees’ members is $75.

Blair Steck, Director of Membership Acquisitions for The Trustees, encourages members to take advantage of the sticker program noting, “it’s the best beach deal to be found on the North Shore. For just $75, Trustees’ members can take enjoy the beach all day, all year – whether it’s taking long walks along the pristine shoreline in the off-seasons, spending a sun-filled Fourth of July with family and friends, or plunging in the Atlantic for a refreshing dip mid-August.”

The parking sticker program is available to Trustees’ members. Membership in The Trustees starts at just $37 for students and seniors, $47 for individuals, and $67 for families. As a Trustees’ member, not only do you enjoy significant savings at Crane Beach, but you’ll also enjoy discounts at other Trustees properties and programs locally and across the state – from the Castle Hill Summer Concert Picnic Series and the luxurious Inn at Castle Hill in Ipswich, to Appleton Cooks! workshops and farm-to-fork events.

Crane Beach is open year-round, 8am to sunset, with restroom facilities available and rangers on-site daily. Dog walking and horseback riding is permitted on the beach in the winter months, from October 1—March 31. Visit www.thetrustees.org/greendogs for permitting and information. From Memorial Day to Labor Day the beach is fully staffed with rangers, lifeguards, and EMTs. The Crane Beach store, featuring refreshments and merchandise, is open daily as well as the bathhouses, with toilets and changing areas, and outside showers and picnic area. The beach staff provides transportation to the beachfront for visitors needing extra assistance.

For nonmembers and Trustees’ members who do not purchase a sticker, 2015 beach pricing remains the same this year. Nonmembers pay $20 on weekdays and $25 on weekends and holidays during the summer beach season (Memorial Day to Labor Day) and Trustees members without a sticker pay $10 on weekdays and $15 on weekends and holidays. Beach admission price is reduced after 3pm and during the offseason.

Membership and Crane Beach sticker and admission fees help support the critical work of The Trustees of Reservations, including the ongoing management, maintenance, and care of special places like Crane Beach and other remarkable natural and cultural treasures on the North Shore and across the state.

For more information, to become a member or renew your membership, and to purchase a beach sticker, visit www.thetrustees.org/cranebeach, email cranebeach@ttor.org, or call 978.921.1944 ext. 1885. For parking updates, beach information and more, follow The Trustees on twitter @CraneBeachMass and Facebook www.facebook.com/craneestate.

Essex – A Front Rolls Through

About 3:45 on Friday, a front rolled through the area providing menacing clouds, incredible spots of sunlight and snow showers in the sky that melted before they hit the ground. Just incredible! Glad to live on Cape Ann and be able to see capture a few scenes like these.  Click the images for larger view

The Latest Striper Video From Brianmoc

After one of the slowest May in years (10 years according to my logs) warmer winds and less rain brought bigger fish up river for Thursday, Friday, Saturday but not Sunday as the fish rested that day. Bait was herring dropping back but warm on Sunday. it got so warm we will be looking for the sand eels as bait in the coming weeks. Finicky fish all three days as the bass had all the bait they could eat and there heads where down pushing bait out of the marsh

Kathy Slifer Things To Do Recommendation A Fall Hike To Crane Beach-

Kathy writes-

Hi Joey , I really enjoyed the pictures Bill O’Conner put up about things to do close to home . We have such wonderful places to explore within 20 minutes of Main St. I see a series here 

Dont forget a fall hike to Crane Beach . Viva Cape Ann .

Kathy Slifer

IMG_2186IMG_2187

Brianmoc Video To Get All You Striper Fishermen Horny

There are some big fish around as Brian shows in this video from May 22-

Brian writes-

42 inch 25+ pound fish Catch & Release Striped bass top water Fishing MA Crane Beach Ipswich Essex 5/22/11 not the first fish of the year but the biggest year. Started my spring fishing with some nice striped bass riding the outgoing tide. This big striper Came up and gulped the jumping minnow down on the first cast. What made this fun was I the rod. I used a 3/8oz – 1oz Temple fork salmon pole 8’6″ or TFO rod. This was not as fat as your avg late season fish but at 25p it was fun fight on light tackle and even bent the vmc hooks. What you are experiencing is a very good tool that if handled right a competent can land very large fish and make fishing for smaller fish that more fun!