David Collins shares vintage photos of Stage Fort Ave homes near Barrett’s Camp #GloucesterMA |searching for artist Byron Brooks Part 3

In response to Searching for artist Byron Brooks (Part 1) and (Part 2), David Collins, a Good Morning Gloucester reader and amateur geneologist, was inspired to act. First he emailed a PDF family tree for artist, Byron Lloyd Brooks, and then shared vivid remembrances and vintage photographs in response to the artist’s timeline in Gloucester, Massachusetts. These are wonderful additions to filling out Brooks story and a peek into Gloucester and Stage Fort Park history. Thanks so much, David!

For a time, Brooks lived in 12 Stage Fort Avenue. Collins’ family lived in 7 Stage Fort Avenue 1940s-1960s. Does anyone know the neighbors Collins mentions or have more photographs of long gone homes and Barrett’s Camp at Stage Fort Park? I’m looking forward to scouting for that boulder.

Part 3 Searching for artist Byron Brooks – David Collins responds:

historic photo courtesy David Collins for artist Bryon Brooks research_shows Stage Fort Park Avenue ca 1940s_his sister with friend_Gloucester MASS
ca. 1950, courtesy photograph to assist with Byron Brooks research from David Collins (his sister with her friend by side entrance 12 Stage Fort Ave, Gloucester, Massachusetts )

“Hello, Catherine, Here is a little more information on the artist Byron L. Brooks, in case you are still interested. I have attached a family tree for him. It does also have some information on his two wives that I know of. I am not a professional genealogist, so don’t take the information as gospel. I grew up at what was then 7 Stage Fort Avenue (no “Park” in the address) in the late 1940s, 50s and early 60s in the house that is now 1 Anchor Lane, I believe. We moved to Connecticut in 1961 the week I turned 16. The house Byron lived in, 12 Stage Fort Avenue, was, back when I lived there, a 2-family house.  Most of the other houses in that part of the neighborhood were, or had been, summer camps. Stage Fort Avenue Y-ed at our house and both parts, one going on to one of the Park’s parking lots and the other going past us to Barrett’s Camps, were named Stage Fort Avenue. The house in front of Byron’s, the address was 10 Stage Fort Avenue back then and is now 7 Stage Fort Avenue, didn’t exist – at least not in the large form it is in now. Sam and Marion (Kerr) Johnson lived there. I think the house burned down in about 1975.

Ralph and Evelyn (DeCoste) Bradstreet lived in the downstairs part of 12 Stage Fort Avenue and several families lived upstairs over the years. Byron must have lived in the neighborhood a while before my family did. I think my folks moved to #7 about 1939 or so. I don’t know when the Bradstreets moved into #12. That said, Byron Brooks was my mother’s 2nd cousin. They share Ephraim Brooks [1818-1905] and Ruth Ward [1816-1892] of Nova Scotia as great-grandparents.

However, I had never heard of Byron until your 2nd GoodMorningGloucester article. I even collect art by people who called Cape Ann home – Charles Movalli was my best friend growing up*. I also have an extensive family tree that I have worked on for many years. Still, I had no idea Byron existed!  Of course, I had his parents in my mother’s part of our tree. I have now added information on him and his many siblings because of your articles. Thank-you! Hope this helps you, in return.” David Brooks 7/1/18

PHOTO COURTESY DAVID COLLINS_ 12 Stage Fort Avenue ca1947_razed_shared for Byron Brooks artist catalogue_Gloucester MA
photo credit: 12 Stage Fort Avenue, Gloucester, MA. ca.1947 photo courtesy David Collins

photo credit below (click to enlarge): 7 Stage Fort Avenue ca.1947-57 (L), and Stage Coach Inn vintage postcard, both images courtesy David Collins

about the photo with the girls on the rock and Stage Fort Avenue homes THEN (now gone):

“This one is of my sister and the girl (and her dog) who lived upstairs at 12 Stage Fort Avenue for several years while we lived on Stage Fort Avenue and then moved to School Street in Manchester. Her father, originally from Rockport, was a 7th cousin of Byron Brooks but I doubt he knew. The girls are sitting on a rock outside the side entrance to downstairs #12, the one the people we called Auntie Evelyn and Uncle Emerson (Ralph Emerson) Bradstreet (both cousins of each of my parents) probably used most often. It led into their kitchen. The doorway at the stairs in front (in the other picture I sent you) led into a hall, with stairs running up to the 2nd floor apartment and also a door at the left into the downstairs apartment.

The building behind the girls and to the left was, at least at one time, a Barrett camp. I think sometimes people bought them and made them more permanent homes even if they didn’t live in them year-round. The family’s name sounded like Brown-eyes but I don’t remember how it was actually spelled. Oh, I do remember: William and Irene (Douglas) Brauneis. Irene Douglas’ brother (a close friend and fishing buddy of my uncle) and his wife and family and his parents lived in the large house at the top of the hill behind the camps that was not a camp. I think the Brauneis family lived in theirs, maybe even full time eventually, long after we had moved.

The next home which looks altogether different was rented out in the summer, too, but I have no idea who lived in it. In the next camp to that one, not in the picture, a Mrs. Morrison spent the summer and her daughter and family, the Kilroys, would join her for a few weeks. Mrs. Kilroy had grown up in Gloucester. I hung around with daughter Carol and brother Robert the part of the summer when they were in town…Henry and Pauline (Osmond) Garvey and family lived in the Barrett camp that abutted our property on (what was then) Stage Fort Avenue. Great family. They would summer there from Tuckahoe, New York, but both had been brought up in Gloucester. ”- David Collins

*author’s note – more on this connection later

Byron Brooks on line catalogue (updated)

 

SUNDAY, TOMORROW, IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO THE SEE THE EXQUISITE CHARLES MOVALLI EXHIBIT AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

The Charles Movalli exhibit at the Cape Ann Museum closes Sunday, May 21st. Don’t miss! The Cape Ann Museum is open on Sundays from 1:00pm to 4:00pm.

For over forty years, Charles Movalli (1945–2016) was a pillar of Cape Ann’s year-round art community, a distinguished landscape and marine painter, a prolific writer and advocate for the arts, and a widely respected teacher.

His paintings have been showcased in solo and group exhibitions throughout the region and showered with awards; his writings on art and artists have been published widely, and his editorial skills earned him a 25-year stint as contributing editor of American Artist magazine. Often referring to himself as “the luckiest man in the world,” Movalli created a body of work which continues to inspire and delight viewers.

This exhibition is drawn from private collections throughout the region and is complemented by gallery talks and discussions exploring Movalli’s career and influence. A full list of program-related exhibits can be found here.

AL BEZANSON’S GREEN DRAGON SCHOONER FEATURED IN CHARLES MOVALLI PAINTING!

Did you know that the schooner shown here in the Charles Movalli painting is none other than Gloucester’s Al Bezanson’s Green Dragon?

Saturday, April 1st, at 2pm author and art historian Judith Curtis is giving an illustrated lecture to accompany the “Charles Movalli: Cape Ann and Beyond” exhibit currently at the Cape Ann Museum. To reserve seating and read more about the event go to the museum’s website here. 

Cape Ann Museum on busy Saturday: art by Nell Blaine, Juni Van Dyke, Pat Lowery Collins, Margarett Sargent, Eric Hudson, Charles Movalli

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Cape Ann Museum docent Margaret Bernier spoke about Honor Moore’s biography of Margarett Sargent, Moore’s Grandmother. The Cape Ann Museum Book Group is reading  The White Blackbird: A Life of the Painter Margarett Sargent. Sargent’s painting Women and Mirror was acquired by the museum in 2002 and is on current temporary display to coincide with the book group and women’s history month. A beautiful Nell Blaine, a diptych by Pat Lowery Collins and two works by Juni VanDyke are also featured. Contact Kate Bibeau to learn more about the book group and other special events like the museum’s second recent on line photo competition, At the Water’s Edge, deadline April 30.

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installation March 2017 Cape Ann Museum. Looking at Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) Women and Mirror (Self Portrait with Model) 1933-1936, oil on canvas. Gift of Alvin and Estella Hochberg, 2002.
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Margarett Sargent and Vivian Pickman

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Pat Lowery Collins 2006 diptych

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Mini ERIC HUDSON exhibition (1864-1932) Cape Ann Museum March 2017

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Eric Hudson, Manana Monhegan Island, c.1920s

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Also CHARLES MOVALLI EXHIBITION

IMG_20170325_150616 Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum on busy Saturday: art by Nell Blaine, Juni Van Dyke, Pat Lowery Collins, Margarett Sargent, Eric Hudson, Charles Movalli”

PARTY SNAPSHOTS FROM THE BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL CHARLES MOVALLI EXHIBIT OPENING TODAY AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

charles-movalli-exhibit-cape-ann-museum-dale-movalli-granddaughter-lauren-oconnor-copyright-kim-smithDale Movalli and Granddaughter Lauren

Lovers of Cape Ann scenes and vistas, don’t miss the exquisite Charles Movalli exhibit “Cape Ann and Beyond,” opening today at the Cape Ann Museum. The reception is free and open to the public. Cape Ann’s landscapes seen through the eyes of Movalli are simply gorgeous. GO today!

 

 

 

 

From the Cape Ann Museum: The Cape Ann Museum will host a special exhibition of paintings by Charles Movalli, opening on Saturday March 4 and remaining on display through May 21, 2017. Cape Ann & Beyond will be drawn from private collections throughout the region and will be complemented by gallery talks and lectures exploring Movalli’s career and the Cape Ann School of painters.

For over forty years, Charles Movalli was a pillar of Cape Ann’s year-round art community, a distinguished landscape and marine painter, a prolific writer and advocate for the arts, and a widely respected teacher. His paintings have been showcased in solo and group exhibitions throughout the region and showered with awards; his writings on art and artists have been published widely and his editorial skills earned him a 25 year stint as contributing editor of American Artist magazine. Often referring to himself as “the luckiest man in the world,” during his long and successful

Dave and Maggie Sullivan Interview Charles Movalli Part II

In the second clip, Charlie discusses what he means by “simplicity” in his work.  Interestingly, he chooses a highly complex scene – the aft deck of a dragger – to illustrate his meaning.

Thanks For Watching

Dave and Maggie Sullivan Interview Charles Movalli

GloucesterArtists.com got a chance to talk with Charles Movalli at his home/studio last week.  Charlie is well known as an author, editor, teacher, and artist around Cape Ann – a contemporary of some of the best painters in the world.

In this first video clip, he uses one of his paintings to illustrate his use of light and dark shapes as the basis for rendering a scene.

Thanks For watching
See http://www.GloucesterArtists.com for more great interviews