Gail McCarthy features Diane Polley and Marion Hall “Celebrating a new illustrated children’s book” today’s paper

Great article about the new children’s book, Let’s Go: Animal Tracks in the Snow! by Diane Polley illustrated by Marion Hall, an award winning entry in the Cape Ann Reads contest.

Celebrating a new illustrated children’s book by Gail McCarthy, Gloucester Daily Times, September 6, 2018

Deborah French, Director of Essex’s TOHP Burnham Library says Diane Polley “is an excellent example of a hidden children’s writer that was brought together with Marion Hall, the illustrator, through the Cape Ann Reads initiative to create a wonderful picture book. I’m sure she has more to come for us all to enjoy.”

BOOK LAUNCH CELEBRATION: Saturday, Sept 8 11:30-1:30, Cape Ann Cinema & Stage, 21 Main Street, Gloucester. “This is a free family drop-in event with children’s activities. Meet Diane Polley of Essex, the author and Marion Hall of Manchester, the illustrator, who will be signing copies of their book.”

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Visually stunning and original, Let’s Go Animal Tracks in the Snow, is a gentle and clever story and non-fiction picture book that engenders shared experiences.  Vivid wintery scenes are intimate and expansive, and beautiful watercolors match and extend the text. Expressions of color notes pop from the pages like finding fresh tracks in new snow. This children’s book is an irresistible inside outside story: snuggle up for a good read and wondrous exploration.

Cape Ann Reads 2018 inaugural celebration of children’s picture books by local artists and writers

The Cape Ann Reads inaugural reception celebrating original children’s picture books by local artists and writers was held at City Hall in Gloucester, Massachusetts, January 27, 2018. Linda Bosselman of Sawyer Free Library was the official photographer for the packed event and she captured all its positive energy and people. An upcoming group exhibition featuring these participants will travel to the four Cape Ann communities. As you can see from the celebration pictures, the touring exhibition and its related receptions and readings will be worth a visit! Cape Ann Reads is an initiative by the four public libraries of Cape Ann.

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The Cape Ann Reads reception and awards ceremony opened  in style – thanks to the red-ribbon cutting courtesy of the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce and Ken Riehl.

Cape Ann Reads childrens picture book reception-local authors & artists Jan 27 2018 City Hall Gloucester MA ©Linda Bosselman (33)

Cape Ann Reads 2018 ribbon cutting courtesy CAPE ANN CHAMBER 20180127_133442-ANIMATION

Portraits of the artists and writers

City Hall is a gorgeous venue for an art fair. Linda photographed all the local artists and writers at their individual picture book display booths. Effort was high. Kind friends manned booths for participants who were unable to attend: Ashley was there for Steven Kennedy and Victoria Petway, and Sinikka Nogelo represented Gail and James Seavey.

Cape Ann Reads childrens picture book reception-local authors & artists Jan 27 2018 City Hall Gloucester MA ©Linda Bosselman (20)
Cape Ann Reads Medal Book- The Tree in Dock Square, written by Jean Woodbury (L) illustrations by Bonnie Sylvester (R)

Welcome

Awards ceremony program began with a warm welcome of support for the arts from Mayor Romeo Theken and opening remarks by the Library Directors and special dignitaries

Jurors

Deliberations were held at Cape Ann Museum and Beauport Hotel.

Cape Ann Reads convened a nine member selection panel that included representatives from each of the public libraries: Justine Vitale Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library; Carol Bender, former Children’s and Teen Librarian,  Rockport Public Library (now at Manchester); Kate Strong Stadt, former Head of Youth Services, Manchester-By-The-Sea Public Library; Ann Cowman, Young Adult Librarian, Manchester-By-The-Sea Public Library; and April Wanner, Assistant Librarian at the TOHP Burnham Library, Essex.  Joining these talented library staff members were three artists and award winning children’s book author-illustrators: Pat Lowery Collins; Giles Laroche; and Anna Vojtech. Bob Ritchie proprietor of Dogtown Book Shop provided another crucial area of book world expertise. Cape Ann Reads is grateful for their time and considerable talents to help the participants and the process.

Each library and the Cape Ann Museum designated one child representative for the second jury — a thoughtful panel of children: Eli Porter, Alycia Hogan Lopez, John Recroft, Lucas Rodi, and Josie West. They put in tremendous effort to read every entry, prepare notes, and come together for discussion. They were tasked with close reading and instructions to let us know any books that were favorites or that they wanted to compliment. Several came to assist the event as junior staff.

 

Awards presentation – Cape Ann Reads Gulliver, Honor and Medal books

Continue reading “Cape Ann Reads 2018 inaugural celebration of children’s picture books by local artists and writers”

Rockport native/Globe columnist Sean Murphy joins impressive panel at Rockport Library, May 6, on “Journalism and fake news”

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LITERARY CAPE ANN shares a press release for the impressive May 6 panel discussion they’re presenting at Rockport Public Library

Journalism in the age of fake news and truth telling

ROCKPORT, MASS— Even the experts can’t always tell fake news when they see it. Technology, politics and shifts in reader habits all play a role in a worrying trend that many say is only going to get worse. The antidote to fake news? Information.

All are invited, free of charge, to take part in what promises to be a fascinating and illuminating discussion. Find out more about fake news, how to spot it and what it means for our democracy long-term. Come prepared with questions and concerns.

Journalism in the age of fake news and truth telling — a panel discussion featuring some of the Boston area’s leading journalists and scholars — is at the Rockport Public Library on Sunday, May 6, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Refreshments and a book signing (“The Return of the Moguls: How Jeff Bezos and John Henry are Remaking Newspapers in the Twenty-First Century” by Dan Kennedy) follow the discussion.

The panel of experts includes:

Dan Kennedy: WGBH commentator, Northeastern University journalism professor, reporter and author

Sean Murphy: Boston Globe editor, columnist and journalist

Jane Enos: Gatehouse Media editor and reporter

Caroline Enos: Gloucester High School Gillnetter editor and activist

Kyle Moody: Fitchburg State University communications professor and fake news expert

hosted by Literary Cape Ann – Together we celebrate and support our abundant literary arts Rae Padilla Francoeur  •  Diana Brown McCloy  •  Mary Riotte      

Literary Cape Ann provides the community of Cape Ann with information and events that support and reinforce the value and importance of the literary arts.

coming home to sunset and nice news

Thanks Tim McCarthy, Cape Ann Beacon, for this big reminder about the Cape Ann Reads celebration tomorrow, noon to four. Gloucester City Hall is set up and ready for dozens of area artists and writers and their original children’s picture books!

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Gail McCarthy highlights Cape Ann Reads and Cape Ann Art Haven in Gloucester Daily Times

in the news- Gail McCarthy highlights two family fun events in today’s Gloucester Daily Times

Friday – The annual Cape Ann Art Haven buoy auction is tomorrow night at Cruiseport!

Saturday – The upcoming Cape Ann Reads celebration at Gloucester City Hall is Saturday January 27 from noon to four. Gail’s article includes interviews with the four Library Directors and Mayor Romeo Theken. The color photograph that’s reproduced is a stunning drawing by Kim Smith from one of her children’s picture books, Beauty on the Wing. There’s also a photograph from Alice Gardner’s drawing installation at The Book Store for her published book St. Peter’s Fiesta.  Here’s the link to the article and a clever title design: All Booked Up: Community Reception and Fair Celebrate literature and art for Children by Gail McCarthy, Gloucester Daily Times

All Booked Up spotlight Cape Ann Reads Celebration by Gail McCarthy for Gloucester Daily times January 25 2018.jpg

Continue reading “Gail McCarthy highlights Cape Ann Reads and Cape Ann Art Haven in Gloucester Daily Times”

Gloucester Daily Times update on Cape Ann Reads

Look for special group exhibits and readings to be announced later in 2018- “Cape Ann Reads to Hit the Road” by Gail McCarthy, Gloucester Daily Times

This month: come to Gloucester’s City Hall on January 27 for a Cape Ann Reads celebration. Explore early drafts & drawings as well as published children’s picture art and books–all by Cape Ann artists and writers. The Book Store of Gloucester will have a satellite book shop devoted to published picture books right on site.

Gail McCarthy Gloucester Daily Times announcing Bruce J Anderson grant award for Cape Ann Reads January 8 2017

Cape Ann Reads Children’s Picture Book Celebration reception and fair

Calling all children’s picture book fans! The four Cape Ann library directors and Mayor Romeo Theken hope you’ll join us for a very special Cape Ann Reads reception at Gloucester’s City Hall on Saturday January 27, 2018, to honor the scores of writers and artists that participated in the Cape Ann Reads contest. The party and pop-up portfolio/book fair will be open to the public from 12pm-4pm. There will be a brief awards ceremony at 1:30. Along with the medal and honor books, the jurors selected several more for special recognition. Breaking news: a group show of these will travel to all four communities in 2018 with support from the Bruce J Anderson Foundation, a Gold Sponsor.

Cape Ann Massachusetts can now boast the country’s FIRST ever picture book contest and programming hosted by four public libraries and wonderful community partners. The contest fostered the local children’s picture book network, and business in the region. Five books were self-published (or in the works) since the contest closed, reviewed and sold in local stores. An original Cape Ann Reads trophy by local artist, Jason Burroughs, has been commissioned and will be unveiled at the celebration.

SAVE THE DATE Cape Ann Reads celebration reception Jan 27 2018 (3)

Please contact capeannreads2016@gmail.com if you’d like to sponsor a prize or award–or any cafes or restaurants that want to showcase a small tray of light fare or coffee/tea–as there’s time to be included in the printed matter.

New children’s picture book by Maura Wadlinger! Faraway Grammie

Faraway Grammie: A Rockport Story is a fantastic, original new children’s picture by Maura Wadlinger with illustrations by Christina Ean Spangler.

You may know Maura from the major part she played in establishing Rockport’s Cultural District, or from her gardening, especially with Rockport’s Millbrook Meadow. Contact Maura for pre orders. Stay tuned for more about this beatiful new book, and details announcing when and where we’ll be able to purchase it on Cape Ann.

As a Cape Ann Reads finalist, the book will be featured in the Cape Ann Reads group exhibition and readings!

 

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2017 Call for Applications for Gloucester’s 5th POET LAUREATE is OPEN!

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS JUNE 9

Links for: 2017 Poet Laureate application (digital format) or 2017 Poet Laureate application (PDF format submit 5 copies).

The City of Gloucester’s Committee for the Arts announces the release of the 2017 Call for Applications for the four year position of Gloucester Poet Laureate. 

The position of Gloucester Poet Laureate is dedicated to building community through poetry and encouraging a love of poetry among people of all ages.  The position was most recently held by the late Peter Todd, appointed in 2014.  During Peter’s time as Poet Laureate, he generously shared his talents with his beloved City of Gloucester. 

Under City Ordinance, the process to select the Poet Laureate is administered by the Committee for the Arts and will involve a Selection Panel including representatives from the local literary community thanks to Eastern Point Lit House and The Gloucester Writers Center.  A recommendation from the Selection Panel will be forwarded to the Committee for the Arts for review and then forwarded on to the Mayor for nomination, subject to confirmation by the City Council.

The Call for Applications is available for download at the Committee for the Arts page on the City website: http://gloucester-ma.gov/index.aspx?nid=102.  Copies also are available at the Sawyer Free Library, the City of Gloucester Mayor’s Office, Eastern Point Lit House, the Gloucester Writer’s Center, and other locales.  Applications must be submitted by 12 pm on Friday, June 9th , 2017. Contact Judith Hoglander, Committee for the Arts with any questions.

gloucester CFTA City Hall WPA mural

 

Revised dates for illustrate your own story

Anna Vojtech’s weekly course begins March 28 (not March 14th). Please adjust your calendars.

new dates

Delightful illustration course at Rocky Neck Cultural Center: award winning children’s book author illustrator, fine artist and Film Animator ANNA VOJTECH

Live: Beauport Hotel hosts Cape Ann Reads jury selection panel

How cool is that? Thank you Beauport Hotel for this community support. What a gorgeous venue and fitting locale for this work! Cape Ann Reads is led by the 4 public libraries of Cape Ann. Deliberations for the first ever Cape Ann Creates for Cape Ann Reads Picture Book Contest are in process and underway!

 

 After a year of monthly programming by the libraries and community partners, the Cape Ann Reads contest is in full swing. Cape Ann residents of all ages, students attending school on Cape Ann, and people who work on Cape Ann were invited to create part or all of a picture book for consideration to be published.  A first edition printing of one of these submissions will be published in 2017, timed to coincide with the 75th anniversary of a Caldecott award for the children’s book, Little House, by Virginia Lee Burton, eminent Gloucester artist, author and illustrator. 
To read more about the jurors, please follow this link
Here is the link to the Cape Ann Reads website. 

Opportunities to contribute or sponsor the Cape Ann Reads contest are available.
Sponsors and contributions can boost awards that the jury panels may suggest as they complete their evaluations and determine recognition options.  Sponsor contribution opportunities could include prizes to  artists and writers, underwriting the publishing, and any exhibitions and readings to be held after publication in all the communities.

  • Various sponsorship, naming and friend levels
  • Juried award sponsor (2 prizes $500 each and up to 8 $100 each)
  • honorable mentions, awards, certificates and prizes (varies)
  • Exhibitions/Readings (at least one at each library)

Thank you, Beauport Hotel!

Haunting for Halloween: Pumpkin carving and poetry John Greenleaf Whittier & Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

Jack o’lantern traditions. There’s this – our annual amateur foray

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and then this public art tableau  that we stop for each year, just past 370 Main Street, Gloucester (before the Crow’s Nest heading into downtown Gloucester)

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The history of carving jack o’lanterns includes a description in a Victorian era poem by John Greenleaf Whittier (b.1807 Haverhill, MA-d.1892 Danvers, MA; resided/buried in Amesbury)-  a Massachusetts poet, legislator, journalist, editor, Quaker, and abolitionist. Cape Ann, North Shore, Essex County, and New England appear in his prose. 

Excerpt from The Pumpkin, ca.1846 Thanksgiving poem

Oh, fruit loved of boyhood! the old days recalling,

When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling!

When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin,

Glaring out through the dark with a candle within!

When we laughed round the corn-heap, with hearts all in tune,

Our chair a broad pumpkin,—our lantern the moon,

Telling tales of the fairy who travelled like steam,

In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her team!

 

Whittier was a contributing founder of Atlantic Monthly.  He was wildly popular, successful, and influential in his time. He helped many other writers. Letters to Whittier “poured in at the rate of ten, twenty, and sometimes thirty a day, making all manner of unreasonable requests and sending innumerable axes to grind…” In 1887 “deluged by over a thousand letters and manuscripts at his birthday, he put a public notice…that he could not answer any letters or read any manuscripts…”* Schools, cities and towns across the country were named after him. “People seem determined to use my name lately in many ways. Within a week I have had two ‘literary Institutes’** named for me, and a big vessel launched last week from Newburyport yard carries “Whittier” in brass letters to her element. I hope I shall not next hear of my name attached to notes of hand!”
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps was “one of the many woman writers Whittier befriended, but their relationship was especially close. Whittier wrote her scores of letters during his life and they met often to discuss religious themes. Whittier once wrote of her: Miss Stuart Phelps was there-an intense nature-frail but strong-a Puritan with passion and fire of Sappho and the moral courage of Joan of Arc.”** Phelps spent her summers at the seaside in East Gloucester, and was equally compassionate about social concerns.
Whittier and Phelps joined other luminaries at gatherings held in the Cambridge home of James (editor/publisher) and Annie Fields (writer) and other salons.  Who might be mixing it up there? Charles Dickens, Mary Abigail Dodge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Dead Howells, Sarah Orne Jewett, Lucy Larcom,  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, Phelps, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Celia Thaxter and Whittier. Jewett, Longfellow and others visited and wrote about Gloucester. Here’s a link from the Cornell University library to Phelps’ Atlantic Monthly article The 10th of January  about the tragic 1860 Pemberton Mills collapse and fire in Lawrence, MA*** (estimated 90-200+ killed), less known than the horrific 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire (146 killed).
*Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier 1861-1892, Volumes I II III, 1975, Harvard, edited by John B. Pickard. Fun read!  We’re told one of the colleges was Whittier college, Salem, Iowa
**ditto above and below any mentions from letters in the timeline

Selected Whittier links and timeline bits:

1908 poem: The Gloucester Mother, by Sarah Orne Jewett, copy of McClure’s Magazine where it first was published: http://www.unz.org/Pub/McClures-1908oct-00702
1888: Whittier “Was there ever such a droll thing?”** letter to Annie Adams Fields gossiping and happy for Elizabeth Stuart Phelps in love with a younger man “Love seems to have cured her…I feel rather aggrieved that I wasn’t consulted.” He calls her E.S.P.  To Celia Thaxter who Whittier visited on the Isle of Shoals, “treasuring evenings in her parlor room where she told ghost stories or they exchanged folk tales:   “What do you think of Eliza Stuart’s marriage to young Ward? He is a good fellow and Elizabeth for once in her life is happy!” Phelps married Herbert Dickinson Ward in 1888–he was 27 and she was 44. It didn’t go well: she bucked his surname within three years and wrote Confessions of a Wife in 1902.
1888 Whittier letter to Annie Fields after editing a new edition of his poetry: “I hope I am correcting a little of the bad grammar, and rhythmical blunders, which have so long annoyed my friends who have graduated from Harvard instead of a country district school.”
1886 Whittier poem: To a Cape Ann Schooner
1886 Whittier letter mentioning Elizabeth Stuart Phelps sending a “very pretty shade of fine lace work…because of its exquisite color” gift on Christmas Eve, which Whittier re-gifted 🙂
1884 Whittier letter to Annie Fields: “Have you seen Elizabeth Phelps lately? I am not in favor of capital punishment, but the burglars who robbed her of her hard earnings would fare hard if I were on the jury that tried them…”
1882 Whittier letter “The world can no longer be to me what it was while Emerson and Longfellow lived. They should have outlived me, for Emerson was never sick, and Longfellow until the last two years had splendid health. A feeling of loneliness and isolation oppresses me. But as Emerson said to me the last time I saw him ‘the time is short’ “ collection of Swarthmore college
1879 Whittier letter to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps: “Dr. Bowditch says that a man of active brain ought to make a fool of himself occasionally and unbend at all hazards to his dignity.” admittedly hard for these two
1877  Mark Twain (work friend),  Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow at Whittier’s 70th birthday celebration. Hawthorne and Whittier were not exactly fans of each other’s works.
1873: Whittier thank you note to Elizabeth Stuart Phelps for sending her book
1868: Whittier letter to Annie Fields complimenting Elizabeth Stuart Phelps The Gates Ajar “Good in itself and full of promise.” 1869 he’s promoting it to Harriet Minot Pittman
1868 Whittier thank you note to James Thomas Field for paying him the $1500 check
1866 Whittier poem: Snow bound: A Winter Idyll  his bestseller and dedicated to his family- memories from childhood
1857 Whittier poem: Garrison of Cape Ann* opens with a view of Cape Ann as seen from Po Hill: “From the hills of home forth looking, far beneath the tent-like span,
Of the sky, I see the white gleam headland of Cape Ann.” For readers that have come this far–the complete Garrison of Cape Ann follows the break.
1843 Whittier poem: Massachusetts to Virginia (in reference to George Latimer, alleged fugitive slave) “The fishing smacks of Marblehead, the sea-boats of Cape Ann…”  Woodie Guthrie 1958 This Land is Your Land feels like a 20th Century connection.

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