Tag Archives: Cape Ann Museum

Cape Ann Museum special exhibition of works by artist and illustrator Harrison Cady opens Saturday July 7

WELCOMING HARRISON CADY TO CAPE ANN MUSEUM _20180702_©c ryan

 

From the museum’s press release:

Cape Ann Museum’s special exhibition of works by artist and illustrator Harrison Cady (1877–1970)

Affectionately known to many as the bug painter, Harrison Cady (1877–1970) was a much loved member of Cape Ann’s summer art colony throughout the 20th century. A prolific illustrator, a printmaker and a painter, Cady was one of the last links to our nation’s Golden Age of Illustration, a distinction he earned through his long collaboration with writer Thornton Burgess. View from the Headlands, a special exhibition of works by artist and illustrator Harrison Cady (1877-1970) will open at the Cape Ann Museum on July 7, 2018, and remain on display through October 28, 2018.

Cady began his 70-year career as an illustrator with the Brooklyn Eagle and later worked for numerous popular American publications, including Life magazine, Ladies’ Home Journal, the Saturday Evening Post, and Good Housekeeping. His syndicated comic strip “Peter Rabbit” ran in the New York Herald Tribune for 28 years.

A frequent visitor to Rockport, Massachusetts, Cady made it his permanent summer home in 1920, purchasing a seafront property known as “The Headlands.” With his studio “the Silo” located nearby, Cady shifted his focus to painting landscapes and harbor scenes. Cady was an early member of the Rockport Art Association, founded in 1921.

View from the Headlands draws on public and private collections throughout the region with examples of Cady’s early magazine illustrations, his work with writer Thornton W. Burgess, and his later landscape paintings. The exhibition reflects the Cape Ann Museum’s commitment to preserving and presenting work that celebrates the area’s culture and history.

Harrison Cady (1877–1970). Lane’s Cove, c.1930s. Oil on board. The James Collection, promised gift to the Cape Ann Museum.Cady_Harrison_©CAPE ANN MUSEUM.jpg

Walter Harrison Cady was born and raised in Gardner, Massachusetts, and headed to New York City at eighteen. The successful artist eventually had an eight room studio in the Sixty Seventh Studios building at 27 West 67, NYC. The Cadys purchased a summer house and studio on Atlantic Avenue in Rockport (see photos above). In addition to this exciting and rare chance to see original work by Cady at Cape Ann Museum, there is a new book celebrating Cady’s art currently in production: Madness in Crowds: The Teeming Mind of Harrison Cady. Cady had long ties with the Rockport Art Association and local artists. Cady’s work is in the collection of the Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and various private collections and institutions. The Archives of American Art has a gifted collection of Harrison Cady (sketchbooks, correspondence, estate papers digitized. How fantastic that work will be acquired by the Cape Ann Museum.

photos below: Harrison Cady sketchbook, ca. 1943. Harrison Cady papers, 1902-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Library of Congress

 

 

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Life Magazine, Volume 62, number 1616, page 658 (1913-10-16) Savannah College of Art and Design

 

 

Cape Ann Museum and Historic New England present Thomas Jefferson Coolidge lecture at Coolidge Point by William R Cross

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Ocean lawn, 2006

postcards from my collection- Coolidge Marble Palace, Magnolia, MA and Coolidge Italian Gardens, Magnolia, MA

enjoy press release from Cape Ann Museum below:

SAVE THE DATE: June 23 at 10:00 a.m.

Thomas Jefferson Coolidge: A Man Ahead of His Time

An illustrated talk by local historian William R. Cross

 GLOUCESTER, Mass. (June 13, 2018) – The Cape Ann Museum and Historic New England are pleased to present a special lecture about Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, on Saturday, June 23 at 10:00 a.m. at Coolidge Point: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Manchester, MA. This program is $15 for CAM/HNE members or $20 nonmembers. Advance purchase of tickets is required. Space is limited. Visit capeannmuseum.org or historicnewengland.org for more information, or call 978-283-0455 x10.

Thomas Jefferson Coolidge: A Man Ahead of His Time, presented by William R. Cross, spotlights the 19th century industrialist whose vision and generosity shape Manchester and New England to this day.  Discover the history of Coolidge’s “wild promontory,” which he shaped into one of the most beautiful places in Massachusetts. Following the lecture, enjoy a visit to the grounds of Historic New England’s most recent acquisition; light refreshments provided.

William R. Cross is a member of the Board of the Cape Ann Museum with a deep knowledge of the 19th century history of Manchester and of Cape Ann.  A longtime public and private equity investor, he now serves as a consultant to various museums, and writes and lectures on art and local history.  He also serves on the Board of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture, and has served in the past on many other for-profit and not-for-profit boards, including those of Christ Church (Hamilton, MA), Christians in the Visual Arts (Madison, WI), and the Museum of Biblical Art (aka MOBIA, formerly New York, NY). He received his BA from Yale College magna cum laude, and his MBA from Harvard University.  He resides in Manchester with his wife Ellen; they are the proud parents of two grown sons. 

Coolidge Point: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is located at 9 Coolidge Point, Manchester-by-the-Sea, MA 01944. Several special public programs will be held there this summer. It is one of more than three dozen historic sites owned and operated by Historic New England, the oldest and largest regional heritage organization in the nation. Historic New England saves and shares New England’s past to engage and inform present and future generations. Historic New England engages diverse audiences in developing a deeper understanding and enjoyment of New England home life by being the national leader in collecting, preserving, and using significant buildings, landscapes, archives, stories, and objects from the past to today.

Roy Spittle Electric installing fresh new banners for Cape Ann Museum

Virginia Lee Burton Little House on one side

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Appraisal Day June 2 Cape Ann Museum White-Ellery Historic House

©Cape Ann Museum White Ellery.jpg

From the Cape Ann Museum – ONE DAY ONLY

“The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present an appraisal day with Blackwood March Auctioneers & Andrew Jacobson Marine Antiques at the White-Ellery House (245 Washington Street, Gloucester) on Saturday, June 2 from 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.  Appraisals are $5 per item, limit 3 items. The historic house will be open for viewing without charge. Appraisal tickets can be purchased in advance by visiting camuseum.eventbrite.com or call (978)283-0455 x10.

Historic houses like the Cape Ann Museum’s White-Ellery House remind us that old things are worth hanging on to and when they are properly cared for they shine. In conjunction with the special exhibition Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann before 1900, the Museum presents an appraisal day, encouraging local residents to bring out their treasures, heirlooms and antiques, which illustrate the history of this area. Join appraisers Michael March from Blackwood March Auctioneers and Andrew Jacobson from Andrew Jacobson Marine Antiques

For two generations Blackwood March auctioneers and appraisers, based in Essex, have appraised and sold at auction fine art and antiques for trusts, estates, attorneys and individuals. In the art market they have established auction records for such artists as: Aldro Thompson Hibbard, Emile A. Gruppe and Frederick Mulhaupt, while selling antiques and accessories for strong prices for various clients. In addition to fine art, participants are encouraged to bring: silver, nautical antiques, Chinese items, Art pottery, Oriental carpets, quilts, Textiles, glass, china, and diverse accessories.

For over twenty years, Jacobson Marine Antiques, based in Ipswich,  has dealt in ship models, half hulls and pond models; nautical paintings and prints; rope work and curios; artifacts, medals and commemorative items; vintage photography; navigational instruments’ scrimshaw and whaling implements; ocean liner, steamship, lighthouse and life-saving memorabilia; and out of print books.

The White-Ellery House, located at 245 Washington Street in Gloucester at the Route 128 Grant Circle Rotary, was built in 1710 and is one of just a handful of First Period houses in Eastern Massachusetts that survives to this day. (First Period means c. 1620–1725.) It is a 2 ½ story “saltbox” structure with a massive central chimney that once serviced six fireplaces. Unlike other structures as old as this, the White-Ellery House has had very few interior alterations over the years. Stepping inside today, visitors enter much the same house they would have 300 years ago.

The White-Ellery House is on the National Register of Historic Sites because of its unique construction and important interior features. The house was built for the Reverend John White (1677–1760), brother-in-law of Cotton Mather, former Chaplain at Fort Saco, author of New England’s Lamentations (1734) and Gloucester’s first settled minister. In keeping with White’s esteemed position in the community, the House exhibits a certain elegance and refinement, perhaps best reflected in the surviving interior details.

At the time the House was constructed, the surrounding area was Gloucester’s Town Green—the center of the community. The Reverend Mr. White’s church, also called a meeting house, was located on the Green and most of the townspeople lived in the immediate area. The Annisquam River was readily accessible and was an important means of transportation for early residents, most of whom were farmers or simple tradesmen, and their families.

The second owner of the White-Ellery House was James Stevens who kept it as a tavern between 1735 and 1740. The House was owned next by the Ellery family who retained ownership of it until 1947. Although the center of Gloucester long ago moved from the Town Green to the Harbor Village, the site remains the entrance to Gloucester and an important historical site.

In 1947, plans were unveiled showing the soon-to-be-constructed Route 128 coming into Gloucester directly through the Town Green and literally on the doorstep of the White-Ellery House. Realizing the House’s importance, the City of Gloucester took it by eminent domain and sold the building to the Cape Ann Historical Museum with the proviso that it be moved immediately. Under the leadership of Museum president Alfred Mansfield Brooks, the House was picked up and moved approximately 100 yards to its present location. For the next decade, Brooks oversaw restoration of the structure, a process which successfully preserved much of the original fabric of the House and which has allowed visitors today to see this gem of First Period architecture, still standing on the edge of Gloucester’s former Town Green. The barn alongside the White-Ellery House is also a First Period structure, built in the mid-1730s, exhibiting the same early construction techniques as the House.

Today, the White-Ellery House serves as a study property, inviting visitors to explore not only the history of early American architecture but also the story of an ordinary New England family who worked hard to provide for themselves and to raise their children, who took part in events of local and national importance, and who sought to preserve their legacy in the face of an ever changing world. The House also serves as a unique venue for art installations and related programming which are held at the site during the summer months.”

Gloucester in the news: Leon Doucette wins global art contest

Leon Doucette’s work was recognized in the American Portrait Society‘s 20th annual International Portrait Competition. A group show for the finalists was held  April 2018.

Beautiful news! Gloucester Daily Times, May 4, 2018 “Local Artist Wins Global Contest: Portrait of Girlfriend Takes Drawing Category”

Leon Doucette Gloucester Daily Times May 4 2018 (2)

20th anniversary International Portrait Competition
2018 Finalists The Art of the Portrait Conference
April 19-22, 2018 – Washington, DC area
It has been a record setting year for the Portrait Society of America. February 1st marked the beginning of our 20th year sharing a passion for the portrait, as of today we have almost 1,000 people registered for the annual conference, and at midnight on February 22, we surpassed our previous number of entries by over 400 – with 2,733 entries submitted to the International Portrait Competition.  Portraiture is alive and well! Thank you to all the artists that submitted work and were part of such a historic time in our organization. Congratulations to the 24 selected finalists

photos (click to enlarge): (1)2016 private commission stemming from 18 Up and Under 30 exhibition at the Hive (2)Nov 2015 portrait of Leon (3) 2015 artist page

Massachusetts Whale Trail #whaletrailMA and more in Gloucester

The Massachusetts Whale Trail “is a special collection of museums and attractions, whale watching, and historic sites and tours with a connection to whales.” Capt Bill & Sons, 7 Seas Whale Watch, and Cape Ann Whale Watch are included.

WhaletrailMA

Naturally, Gloucester had created a version on the HarborWalk which you can find on line or on the trail at marker #36 right by Tonno Restaurant, Gloucester, MA.  Whale watching is beloved here in town. The Gloucester HarborWalk has whale watch information, points of interest and a tab to all the local whale watching  companies.”Most offer daily whale watching trips from April through October.”

SEVEN SEAS WHALE WATCH +1 (888) 283-1776
CAPE ANN WHALE WATCH +1 (800) 877-5110
CAPT BILL & SONS +1 (800) 339-4253
YANKEE FLEET +1 (978) 283-0313

When O’Maley 6th graders study Gloucester and visit the HarborWalk, the student thank you drawings featured whale tails and spouting whales. It’s common for local kids to be invited to birthday parties on whale watch trips.  Donna Ardizzoni photographed and wrote about her Right Whale sightings from shore spring 2018, and more whale sightings around town. Parsons Street wall Mural (by the Fish Net HarborWalk street mural) was painted by local kids under the direction of Cape Ann Art Haven and features a great whale.

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Ocean Alliance headquarters is located in Gloucester. Kim Smith posted the announcement for its most recent National Geographic special. 

Maritime Museum (opening May 26) and Cape Ann Museum are included on the new Whale Trail map. Cape Ann Museum collection includes Hartley’s study for Whales Jaw Dogtown

Hartley-WhalesJaw collection CAPE ANN MUSEUM Gloucester Mass

Stores along Main Street and throughout Gloucester’s neighborhoods have art and goods inspired by whales. Look for hand carved wood sculptures at Willow Rest. Savour Wine & Cheese, Gloucester, MA

 

 

 

Gloucester Public School 10th Anniversary ARTS festival

Beautiful colorful banners on Dale Avenue announce GPS 10th anniversary annual ARTS festival, Saturday May 12th 11-4pm, at City Hall, Cape Ann Museum, and Sawyer Free Library! Sponsored by Gloucester Education Foundation; what a milestone!

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Virginia Lee Burton Folly Cove designer’s diploma from Cape Ann Museum featured in Massachusetts masterpiece trail

Virginia Demetrios is Virginia Lee Burton’s married name and author credit she used for her work as Folly Cove Designer and founder. Her linocut was curated for the MASSterpiece trail 🙂 from Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism (MOTT): https://www.flipsnack.com/eohed/massachusetts-masterpiece-trail.html

Virginia Lee Burton Demetrios

fun mass masterpiece trail.jpg

Explore them all!

Calling all grandparent caregivers! Sawyer Free library hosting a fascinating program with community partners just for you

Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Libary Childrens Services Tuesday April 24, 2018 5:30-7pm 

“Opening Doors, Opening Hearts: Grandparents raising Grandchildren Cape Ann: Guest speakers Deborah Doucette author of Raising our Children’s Children: Room in the Heart and Colleen Pritoni, Director of Commission on the Status of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren.”

This original & innovative event is hosted by Sawyer Free Library Childrens Services in collaboration with community partners like: Cape Ann Museum,  Cape Ann YMCA, Senior Care, The Open Door, Healthy Gloucester Collaborative, WIC, Pathways, NS MVP, and Backyard Growers.

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Larry O’Toole Amazing map and Historic murals at O’Maley School #GloucesterMA

Five monumental Larry O'Toole paintings circa 1948- reinstalled O'Maley School circa 1971 - Gloucester MA DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 wit

photo above- Five monumental Larry O’Toole (1909-1951) paintings circa 1948 were rescued and reinstalled O’Maley School circa 1982. Gloucester MA excellent DPW crew Mike Hale, Joe Lucido, Phil Curcuru, Mike, and John inspecting 2018 with ©c ryan.  Thank you DPW! City art is routinely checked. Photo by Phil Curcuru below- note the artist’s distinct “L” signature

Larry O'Toole signature photo by Phil Curcuru Gloucester MA DPW  #5 installed at O'Maley painting pre dates 1951.jpg

If you haven’t seen the series of five murals painted circa 1945 by fine artist and muralist, Larry O’Toole (1909-1951), that were rescued and installed (decades ago) at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, perhaps you’ve noticed a poster of his brilliant pictorial map around Cape Ann.

O’Toole published editions of the map in 1947 and 1948. Reproductions of “A Salty Map of Cape Ann: Gloucester-Magnolia-Rockport-Pigeon Cove-Lanesville-Bay View-Annisquam” the 1948 blue version are available at Cape Ann Museum shop.  The delightful map includes inventive and intricate details and local nods: a shout out to Ben Pine’s* wharf, “All maps like this have a sea serpent;” schooners like the Henry Ford and Gertrude Thebaud (again Pine); historic sites and characteristic scenes not to miss “Artists and Seagulls”; and upcoming landmarks to look forward to like the Annisquam Bridge slated for completion in 1950. The numbered border framing elements could have been inspired by Virginia Lee Burton.close up zoomable map (sold) can be found here 

 

Gloucester, Massachusetts Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner Gertrude Thebaud against the Canadian schooner Blue Nose for the fisherman trophy, one of the three men who made

Ben Pine office, 1941, Howard Liberman FSA/OWI photograph

Ben Pine* portrait by FSA/OWI photographer, Howard Liberman, titled “Gloucester, Massachusetts. Capt. Ben Pine, the man who raced the schooner “Gertrude Thebaud” against the Canadian schooner “Blue Nose” for the fisherman’s trophy, is one of the three men who made Gloucester. The others were Tom Carrol and Ray Adams.” (author’s note: Ray Adams was a gal so the compliment is for two men and one woman…).

Art can be seen on the walls throughout the Gloucester Mariner’s Association in Howard Liberman’s faint photos from 1941. I’m looking for more interior shots. Some of the art could be O’Toole’s, who completed commissions for Pine.

Carved fish models at the Gloucester’s Mariners Association (Fishermen’s Institute)

Howard Liberman FSA photo Gloucester Mariners Association.jpg

 

Cape Ann Museum Kids Calligraphy with Albina Papows!

CAM Kids Calligraphy.jpg

Learn calligraphy basics in a morning class with specialist Albina Papows. Inspired by the special exhibition Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann before 1900. Write your name, use calligraphy tools and leave with a sampler to take home. This family workshop is recommended for children 7 and up with an adult. Registration required. To register, please contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org or (978) 283-0455 x16.

Read more at : http://www.capeannmuseum.org/events/cam-kids-second-saturday04-14-18/

 

free Teacher workshop at Cape Ann Museum with support from Essex Heritage | “Unfolding Histories” exhibition opens March 31!

Exciting news from Cape Ann Museum:

March 2018

Teachers throughout Essex County are invited to Cape Ann Museum to study Unfolding Histories: Cape Ann Before 1900, the first major exhibition to bring together historical and archival material from nine Cape Ann institutions focused on life during Cape Ann’s early years, including stories which illuminate the Native American and European contact period, the Revolutionary War, and 19th century history and culture.

Teachers who attend the April 7th Teacher Workshop will discover strategies to increase student literacy with primary source documents using an inquiry-based learning model to tie larger themes to our local area. Designed for K–12 teachers currently working in public & private schools throughout Essex County, this free workshop is a way to earn 10 PDPs for attending the session and creating an activity plan, with additional opportunities to earn more. Space is limited to twenty teachers; registration required. For more information please contact Essex Heritage Education Director Beth Beringer at bethb@essexheritage.org or (978) 740-0444.

The Unfolding Histories exhibit will be on view March 31, 2018- September 9, 2018. Massachusetts Teacher Association members are admitted free!

 

THE UNLIKELY STORY OF THE FOLLY COVE GUILD

Led by beloved children’s author Virginia Lee Burton, this group of mostly untrained women created immortal designs.

Atlas Obscura

By Cara Giaimo

Folly Cove Designers Eino Natti “Polyphemus” 1950 Cape Ann Museum

One by one, the prints unfold before you. One shows sheep leaping in the grass, another, children on a tree-hung swing, the moon shifting above them. All are charming, sophisticated, and unbelievably detailed. They take the essence of everyday objects and activities, and unspool them into mesmerizing patterns. No matter how much you may want them, though, you can’t get these prints on Etsy. In fact, you can’t get them anywhere.

They live mere miles from where they were produced, at the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester—the last bastion of the nearly forgotten Folly Cove Designers. Helmed by a children’s book illustrator and comprised of her previously untrained friends and neighbors, the Folly Cove Designers were hardworking, tight-knit, and sincere—so sincere, they eventually voted themselves into obscurity.

To children worldwide, Virginia Lee Burton is the beloved hand behind half a dozen classics, including Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, and The Little House, intricately illustrated tales of close-knit communities. But to her neighbors at Folly Cove, on the north shore of Massachusetts, she was Jinnee Demetrios. Jinnee and her husband, the sculptor George Demetrios, moved to the area in 1932 with their one-year-old son Aristides, who was soon followed by Mike. The couple quickly became community pillars, making art all day, and spending evenings gathering their friends and neighbors for raucous sheep roasts.

“Folly Cove gets its name because it would be folly to bring a ship in and turn it around,” says Christine Lundberg, producer of the film Virginia Lee Burton: A Sense of Place, as well as the upcoming Beautiful and Useful: The Art of the Folly Cove Designers. This ethos carried over into the rough-and-ready town life. “You couldn’t get pretty little things,” says Lundberg. “If you wanted them, you had to make them.” An artist through and through, Jinnee surrounded herself with homemade treasures, including, as the story goes, a particularly nice set of block-printed curtains. One of her neighbors, Aino Clarke, admired the curtains so much she wanted to make her own. Jinnee and Aino struck a deal: Jinnee would give Aino top-to-bottom design lessons if Aino, a member of the local orchestra, would teach Jinnee’s sons the violin. (A less legendary, but perhaps more truthful, version of this tale holds that Aino suggested Jinnee give design lessons to her neighbors in exchange for money to buy the necessary paper to illustrate her first book.)

Regardless of exactly how the two came together, Jinnee’s flint struck on Aino’s iron sparked an artistic movement. Within its rock-hard exterior, Folly Cove harbored a vein of artistic impulse that dated all the way back to the 1800s, when painters had flocked there to take advantage of the seashore’s distinct sunlight. (“If you spend time lying on the granite around here, you get creative powers,” one resident told Lundberg). As Jinnee and Aino dove into the lessons, other members of the community began joining them.

Folly Cove Designers Virginia Lee Demetrios “George’s Garden” 1964  Printed in her favorite color. Cape Ann Museum

Thus began the Folly Cove Designers (FCD), a ragtag group of locals united by their desire to fill their lives and their minds with a particular form of well-thought-out beauty. Many members were, like Aino Clarke, the children of Finnish immigrants, and sought to combat the economic and emotional hardships of the Great Depression. Others were so-called “Yankees,” who had moved permanently to Folly Cove after vacationing there as children, and who wanted something new to do. Eino Natti, one of the group’s few male members, was an Army veteran and former quarryman—experiences he drew on for prints such as Polyphemus, of a granite-carting train, and PT, which shows near-identical soldiers in mid-squat. Elizabeth Holloran, the local children’s librarian, printed young people skiing and sugaring. “A majority of them were never artists,” says Cara White, director of the Cape Ann Museum’s Folly Cove gallery. “They were editors, architects, housewives, accountants.”

The Folly Cove Designers “diploma,” presented to each member by Jinnee upon their entrance to the guild. Cape Ann Museum.

READ MORE HERE

COLLEEN’S ARTS AND CRAFTS FOR LITTLE ONES ON DISPLAY AT THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM!

My friend Colleen teaches the sweetest and most fun art class for local youngsters, ages three to seven. Inspired by nature, the projects Colleen leads the children in creating are always wonderfully whimsical. Currently, at the children’s activities room at the Cape Ann Museum, you can see a display of work by her young artists.


Stop in and see-I think you will be utterly charmed, as was I! 

*   *   *

The Cape Ann Museum has several excellent children’s programs scheduled for February vacation.

Wednesday, February 21

Play creative movement games with Sarah Slifer Swift of MAGMA studio and create art that moves!

Thursday, February 22
What’s art got to do with basketball? Shoot hoops at the YMCA, then come to the Museum and sculpt basketball players inspired by those of sculptor Walker Hancock.

Ages 6-12. CAM Members $30/day; non-members $45. Additional children receive discounted rate. To register, please contact Education Coordinator Kirsten Vega at kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org or (978) 283-0455 x16

Image: Walker Hancock (1901–1998), Basketball Players (c. 1961–1977). Bronze. Museum purchase with funds generously provided by Evelyn Bartlett, 1982 [Acc. #2576].

#AcornPress in action: Mary Rhinelander demonstrates printmaking at #GloucesterMA O’Maley Middle School, also

the upcoming weekly workshop at Cape Ann Museum that Mary Rhinelander will be teaching is SOLD OUT, again. Look for future offerings.

The very dedicated and talented O’Maley art teacher, Brett Dunton, shares some action shots of fine artist and master printmaker, Mary Rhinelander, guest teaching printmaking with the authentic Acorn press in one of the 8th Grade art classes at O’Maley Innovation Middle school. Note the foot.

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Fine artist Mary Rhinelander guest teaching linoleum block printing on historic Acorn press at O’Maley Innovation Middle School, with teacher Brett Dunton art class, Gloucester, MA February 2018

Historic portraits sometimes belie the physicality of the process

einonatti on press

Aino Natti (Isabel’s grandfather)

Wonder if the O’Maley students will try this energetic technique? photograph of Aino Clarke from the Cape Ann Musem Folly Cove collection  Read more

Cape Ann Museum teams up with YMCA and MAGMA to promote youth art and sport this February vacation

Within its galleries or on the local road, Cape Ann Museum’s inventive partnering promotes art and projects all children can take part in.

Cape Ann Museum education coordinator, Kirsten Vega, shares special upcoming February programming including two new offerings during school vacation 2018: movement games and art at MAGMA, plus basketeball and art with the YMCA.

Thursday, February 8, 10:30-11:30 am: Young at Art – Folly Cove Designer Valentines. Bring your toddler to Cape Ann Museum for Young at Art on the second Thursday of each month. During this special Valentine’s Day session, we’ll explore the Folly Cove Designers exhibit, touch printmaking tools, learn a song with hand motions, and print our own Valentine’s Day cards. Recommended for children ages 4 and younger with an adult. Free for members or with Museum admission. 

Saturday, February 10, 10:00-12:00 pm: Valentine Workshop with Coco Berkman. Hand print your own animal themed Valentine’s Day cards in printmaker Coco Berkman’s family workshop! Participants leave with a set of cards. Ages 6+ / Free for families.  Space is limited; e-mail kirstenvega@capeannmuseum.org for reservations.

 February 20 & 21, 1:00-4:00 pm February School Vacation: Let’s Move at the Museum! Wednesday, February 21 | 1:00-4:00 pm Play creative movement games with Sarah Slifer Swift of Movement Arts Gloucester (MAGMA) studio and create art that moves. Thursday, February 22   | 1:00-4:00 pmWhat’s art got to do with basketball? Shoot hoops at the YMCA and create basketball player sculptures inspired by Walker Hancock.  

Saturday, February 27: 1:00-1:45pm: Family Tour  A tour for history detectives of all ages! Discover the story of Cape Ann by taking a closer look at 10 objects from paintings to film. End your tour in the Activity Center with hands-on fun and art-making. Recommended for families with children under 12. Free for CAM members or with Museum admission. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

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That’s a big movie poster! Dead in the Water Cape Ann Museum premiere

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from the Cape Ann Museum- Gloucester Screening set for “Dead in the Water” FEB 10

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association,  is pleased to present “Dead in the Water”,  on Saturday, February 10 at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.  The documentary film dealing with the devastating impacts of federal regulations on the lives of New England ground fishermen was produced and directed by Rockport native and professional filmmaker David Wittkower. A panel discussion with film participants will follow each showing. Tickets are $8 for Museum members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations can be made at camuseum.eventbrite.com or call (978)283-0455 x10.

Two and a half years in the making, “Dead in the Water” is Wittkower’s fifteenth documentary film. It was shot in different coastal towns and features scenes and interviews with area fishermen, their spouses and other family members; advocates for fishermen; elected officials; and community activists.  “This film opens the doors for the world to see how difficult and dangerous the life of a fisherman is,” said John Bell, a former three-term mayor of Gloucester (2002 -08). “On top of that, the impact of misguided federal regulations on fishermen has never been presented as powerfully as it is in ‘Dead in the Water.’ This film packs a real punch. It stays with you long after you’ve seen it.” The film also includes the song, “Gloucester Harbor Shore” by Grammy® Award winner, Paula Cole.

Wittkower, a graduate of the American Film Institute in cinematography, describes “Dead in the Water” as an examination of the “relentless destruction of the New England ground

Read more

Cape Ann Museum

January is Membership Month.  Also every year the Museum opens its doors free of charge to all Cape Ann Residents during the month of January.  If you have never been there, you are missing out on a great day of learning and enjoyment.

For more information please check on the link below:

http://www.capeannmuseum.org/

 

 

MAJOR NEWS: RHONDA FALOON TO RETIRE FROM THE CAPE ANN MUSEUM

WE LOVE YOU AND WILL MISS YOU RHONDA!

THANK YOU

Dear Friends,

I’m writing to let you know that after almost 13 years as the Executive Director of the Cape Ann Museum, Ronda Faloon has announced her retirement plans. She will continue in her role as Director until May of 2019 and will work with the Museum’s Board of Directors to ensure a smooth transition.

Ronda has led the Museum through a time of meaningful change. When she accepted the director’s position, she spoke of making the Museum “matter” to the community every day. Under her leadership, the Museum has grown into a well-respected and vibrant cultural institution of which we can all be proud.
Perhaps the most visible accomplishment of her tenure was the completion of the transformational renovations in 2014. Less visible, but equally as important, Museum membership has grown and financial support has doubled. The quality and number of our exhibitions and programs have expanded over the years. We have a stronger collection: We’ve been the recipient of major gifts of art and other major gifts are on the horizon. Our two historic houses – the 1710 White Ellery House and 1804 Captain Elias Davis House – have been stabilized and improved. We’ve placed a high premium on scholarship, as evidenced by the development of the online catalogue raisonnéFitz Henry Lane Online and our recent symposium on Lane’s lithography. This past year, we welcomed close to 30,000 visitors – twice as many as were seen a decade ago. Our audiences are more engaged and we have a deeper and richer relationship with our surrounding communities.
I know that Ronda would want me to acknowledge the collaborative nature of these accomplishments. This could not have been done without her colleagues who tirelessly invest their innumerable talents and efforts toward advancing the Museum’s mission or the work of committed Board members and volunteers who offer guidance and wisdom, and who also “roll up their sleeves.” Nor could this have been done without those of you who have encouraged and inspired her, and generously supported the Museum each and every year.

While there is never a perfect time for a transition, the Museum has never been stronger or more prepared for change. We have a renewed commitment to our mission and recognize that there is power in being a small, intimate museum with a stellar collection and a singular story to tell.

We’re close to completing an update of our strategic plan (2018-2023) which will guide our initiatives over the next years and lead us toward the celebration of the Museum’s 150th anniversary and Gloucester’s 400th anniversary in 2023. This is indeed an exciting moment in the Museum’s history and an exciting time for new leadership.

Ronda and I are truly grateful to all of you who are committed to the growth and prosperity of our extraordinary museum.

With warm wishes for the new year,

John Cunningham
President of the Board  
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