Boston Globe rave review for Yella on the Water restaurant #GloucesterMA

Love the title and wonderful review!

“On the menu Yella on the Water seems to have become instantly popular, and we could see why.”

Read “Lebanese cuisine with a splash of Gloucester” by Coco McCabe and Doug Stewart Boston Globe 11/20/19 here

 

Yella on the Water Gloucester Massachusetts_ November 2019 © c ryan (2)

Discovery Channel ‘Expedition Unknown’ host Josh Gates is from Manchester by the Sea | don’t miss Billy Baker’s gem of a ‘secret’ story Boston Globe

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John Tlumacki Boston Globe photo The Krupat family found buried treasure in Boston's North End article by Billy Baker.jpg

excerpt –

“…Then early last year, “Expedition Unknown,” a television show on the Discovery Channel, did a special on “The Secret” that set off a new frenzy of treasure hunters.

“I’ve been making travel adventure shows for 10 years, and I’ve never seen anything like the reaction to that show,” said Josh Gates, the show’s host, who is a Tufts grad and a native of Manchester-by-the-Sea. “So many people contacted me, and a lot of them were from the Boston area because it’s long been believed that one of them was hidden there.”

The Krupat children, 12-year-old Molly and 10-year-old Jack, saw the episode and called their parents into the room, knowing this would be right up their father’s alley. Jason Krupat makes his living as a puzzle and game designer. Soon, the family began making weekend trips into the city to work on what had come to be known as “the Boston verse.”

Great read. Hidden treasure, a family’s quest, and ‘The Secret’ by Billy Baker Boston Globe, here.

photos above – John Tlumacki Boston Globe “The Krupat family found buried treasure in Boston’s North End” and West Construction Corp., Halifax.

 

Boston Globe recommends upcoming Walt Whitman celebration in Gloucester

Save the date: Special Walt Whitman collaborative celebration presented by Gloucester Writers Center and Cape Ann Chamber Music scheduled for November 17, 2pm, St Paul Lutheran Church, Gloucester, MA.

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calling Marty Luster 🙂

Boston Globe seashore jaunt all #GloucesterMA | Beauport Museum, Halibut Point restaurant, Virgilio’s, Bananas

Gloucester in the news again this weekend about  a great road trip. See today’s Sunday paper- Boston Globe By Linda Greenstein

Read full article  here

to see more mentions from their itinerary.

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Gloucester in the news: Cape Ann Museum back to back stories in the Boston Globe

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More than just kids’ stuff: Children’s literature inspires shows at the MFA and Cape Ann MuseumBoston Globe by Mark Feeney October 14, 2018

Mark Feeney highlights the Cape Ann Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in the Boston Globe Sunday Arts Museum Specials edition because of  concurrent spectacular and rare exhibitions: Winnie the Pooh Exploring a Classic opened September 22 and continues through January 6th, 2019 at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston;  Virgina Lee Burton “The Little House: Herstory” opens November 3rd at the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester and continues until March 31, 2019.

Mark Your Calendars! Here are Cape Ann Museum art shows inspired by children’s literature on display now, upcoming and not to miss:

  • Harrison Cady exhibition continues through November 9th retrospective of a dazzling Golden Age of Illustration legend, cartoonist and fine artist 
  • Virginia Lee Burton exhibition The Little House: Herstory opens November 3rd  Burton resided and worked in Gloucester, Mass., where she created some of America’s most popular and seminal children’s books. She received the Caldecott medal in 1943 for The Little House. Other books include Katy and the Big Snow and Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. She is renowned for her influential work as a Folly Cove textile designer and founder. Cape Ann Museum is the biggest repository of her art and archives. This 2018 survey will be gorgeous!

If you time it right there is a window of overlap where you can visit both the Harrison Cady and Virginia Lee Burton exhibitions.

  • A group show celebrating Cape Ann Reads new original children’s picture books by local artists and writers will open in January

Barr-Klarman Foundations team up on 25 million arts initiativeBoston Globe October 3, 2018 

Cape Ann Museum received $375,000 Barr-Klarman investment funding in recognition of its stellar contribution to arts and culture in Massachusetts. The Barr Klarman Arts Initiative will disperse 25 million to 29 arts organizations; Cape Ann Museum is one of 3 North of Boston recipients.

Boston Globe comes to #GloucesterMA for a perfect weekend

“How to spend a perfect weekend in Gloucester and the other cape”, by Christopher Muther, Boston Globe. 

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Article describes some Gloucester highlights: Cape Ann Museum and Harrison Cady exhibition, Gloucester Beaches, Stage Fort Park, Half Moon Beach, Gloucester Shuttle, Cape Ann Cinema, Gloucester Stage, Schooner Thomas E. Lannon, Hammond Castle Museum, Perfect Storm, Wicked Tuna, Rocky Neck, Latitude 43, Lobsta Land, Zeke’s Place, Willow Rest, Beauport Hotel, Ocean Hotel at Bass Rocks, Beth Williams, and (couldn’t get a reservation at) Duckworth’s Bistro.

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Detail from Harrison Cady on exhibition Cape Ann Museum 

 

Rockport native/Globe columnist Sean Murphy joins impressive panel at Rockport Library, May 6, on “Journalism and fake news”

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LITERARY CAPE ANN shares a press release for the impressive May 6 panel discussion they’re presenting at Rockport Public Library

Journalism in the age of fake news and truth telling

ROCKPORT, MASS— Even the experts can’t always tell fake news when they see it. Technology, politics and shifts in reader habits all play a role in a worrying trend that many say is only going to get worse. The antidote to fake news? Information.

All are invited, free of charge, to take part in what promises to be a fascinating and illuminating discussion. Find out more about fake news, how to spot it and what it means for our democracy long-term. Come prepared with questions and concerns.

Journalism in the age of fake news and truth telling — a panel discussion featuring some of the Boston area’s leading journalists and scholars — is at the Rockport Public Library on Sunday, May 6, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Refreshments and a book signing (“The Return of the Moguls: How Jeff Bezos and John Henry are Remaking Newspapers in the Twenty-First Century” by Dan Kennedy) follow the discussion.

The panel of experts includes:

Dan Kennedy: WGBH commentator, Northeastern University journalism professor, reporter and author

Sean Murphy: Boston Globe editor, columnist and journalist

Jane Enos: Gatehouse Media editor and reporter

Caroline Enos: Gloucester High School Gillnetter editor and activist

Kyle Moody: Fitchburg State University communications professor and fake news expert

hosted by Literary Cape Ann – Together we celebrate and support our abundant literary arts Rae Padilla Francoeur  •  Diana Brown McCloy  •  Mary Riotte      

Literary Cape Ann provides the community of Cape Ann with information and events that support and reinforce the value and importance of the literary arts.

Boston Globe on #GloucesterMA Dogtown

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Dogtown has inspired artists working in all media. This photo shows some of the panels comprising the Dogtown Commons section of the Frederick L. Stoddard monumental “conventionalized treatment” (his favored descriptor) of Gloucester and the region — two story “mural fresco in situ, completed in 1934 for Saunders House, Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Public Library, under the auspices of the WPA. The city of Gloucester was awarded an impressive array of WPA-era pursuits- from creative expression in all media to civic construction projects.

Boston Globe article: A Plan to keep Dogtown wild and Free by Sarah Shemkus 

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Carol Ackerman Boston Globe obituary

Lovely tribute to long term teacher and volunteer – Carol Ackerman (December 17, 1941 – October 31, 2017) Boston Globe obituary by Marvin Pave published Dec 3rd (following special memorial service held in the Shalin Liu Performance Center). Ackerman served on many boards in the community — Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free, the Gloucester UU, Rockport Music, and Wellspring.

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Obit in the Gloucester Daily Times

 

Gloucester High School in Sunday Boston Globe

Boston Globe article 12/3/17

Gloucester High School Extends First Aid to Mental Health by Laura Elyse King

Mayor Romeo Theken adds “we’ve also been doing these workshops with all employees and managers, too.”

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Boston Globe lists the Great Marsh symposium NOV 9th- public invited

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Great marsh logoThere’s still time to register today or walk in tomorrow for the Great Marsh Coalition 5th annual special conference on rising water issues and natural systems. Register thru Essex County Greenbelt $20 fee  WHEN: November 9, 2017, 8:30AM- 3:15PM. WHERE: Woodman’s in Essex.

From the Great Marsh Coaltion:

Generous Great Marsh coalition symposium supporters (many are coalition members)- local municipalities, Essex County Greenbelt, Essex National Heritage Area, Mass Audubon, Ipswich River Watershed  Assoc., League of Women Voters Cape Ann, Merrimack Valley Planning Commission, Metropolitan Area Planning Commission (MAPC), National Wildlife Federation, and The Trustees 

What is the Great Marsh Coalition?

The Great Marsh Coalition is a group of organizations and agencies that began meeting in spring 2000 to discuss ways of building a regional consciousness and identity for the Great Marsh. The Coalition supports a coordinated approach to education, research, protection, and management to promote preservation, restoration, and stewardship of the Great Marsh. Current Coalition members include (but are not limited to): City of Gloucester is one of Eight Towns and the Great MarshEssex County Greenbelt AssociationEssex National Heritage AreaIpswich River Watershed AssociationMassachusetts Audubon SocietyMassachusetts Office of Coastal Zone ManagementMassachusetts Department of Environmental Management’s ACEC ProgramParker River Clean Water Association, Cultural Alliance of the Lower Merrimack Valley, and The Trustees of Reservations.

GREAT MARSH COALITION

Boston Globe article and Continue reading “Boston Globe lists the Great Marsh symposium NOV 9th- public invited”

Boston Globe focus on farm & sea to table | Gloucester’s Cape Ann Fresh Catch

Today’s Boston Globe: Meat and Seafood Supporters Tap Into Community Support by Johanna Seltz

features Gloucester CSA CAPE ANN FRESH CATCH: http://www.capeannfreshcatch.org/

“which started in conjunction with the Gloucester Fisherman’s Wives Association in 2008 and has about 400 people signed up for the current season…Recent species include…”

“Marshall gets her fish from about a dozen Gloucester fishing boats, and every CSA package includes a note with the name of the boat that caught the contents…” 

Boston Globe Cape Ann Fresh Catch Sept 17

#GloucesterMA in Boston Globe & Cape Ann Beacon- Good Harbor Beach Salt Island for sale, again

July 2016 Salt Island Good Harbor Beach

Salt Island, Good Harbor Beach and Brier Neck are naturally connected. The five acre Salt Island is about 1000 feet from Good Harbor Beach in Gloucester, Massachusetts. A sandbar links the island and beach at low tide. I’ve culled a few milestones in its history. Scroll down to 2017 to find the links for the Cape Ann Beacon and today’s Boston Globe.

SALT ISLAND TIMELINE BITS

1860

History of the Town of Gloucester: Cape Ann, John Jame Babson’s published history includes a shipwreck of the vessel, Industry, at Little Good Harbor Beach near Salt Island in 1796

19th century

Joseph Parsons’ family operated a lobster business from Salt Island

pre 1919

silent movies were filmed on location

1919 Fox Film Co Bride Number 13

Parts of the Fox Film Corporation movie, Bride Number 13, were shot on location at Good Harbor Beach and Salt Island. The 15 part serial silent film –“the most costly pictures ever made…would consume expenditures of at least one million dollars.” It was conceived and written by Edward Sedgwick, directed by Richard Stanton aka “Salt Island’s Mighty Emperor”, and starred Marguerite Clayton, Jack O’Brien, and Ed Rossman. The script was inspired by Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.

Here are a few fun excerpts from 1919 correspondence published in the book, “My father, a silent films pioneer,” by George E. Mcavoy:

“Again the picturesque Gloucester shores have been sought by a motion picture corporation for scenery and the noted Fox Film Company of New York, with its prominent director, Richard Stanton, has arrived at Hotel Harbor View, East Gloucester, to start immediately on the work of filming “Bride Number 13” at Salt Island off Brier Neck.

“It was decided that Salt Island in Gloucester, Mass., would be the setting of the silent film thriller, “Bride Number 13.” This island was an island at high tide and part of the mainland at low tide. Fox film Co. was building a wooden castle on the island, which was about one hundred feet high and hosted the actions of this silent film…” 

“(This was five days before the real tornado blew the wooden castle out to sea.)”

Oct 24, 1919“Dear Mother: I left Mary and the babies in Gloucester. I am on my way through New Hampshire and Maine for a lumber camp location. I expect to be back in Gloucester Monday night…

the time for the blowing up of the castle on Salt Island and the rescue of the brides from the pirate band is rapidly approaching…

Billy Carr of Gloucester, Chief Gunner’s Mate on the Navy submarine R-1 that was assigned to the picture, was to play the hero who rescues one of the brides, slashes through the nest of cutthroats, leaps into the basket with her and off. It was now November 10th. A throng of 3,000 was at Good Harbor and all over Brier Neck to watch…On the fourth day Bill Carr was called away on duty and his place was taken by Tom Corbiey…”

“Mr. Sedgwick has achieved something heretofore unknown in moving picture production. He conceived the idea of the story, witnessed and helped direct the scenes, acted in them, had a hand in the grinding of the film, and in fact had a part in every process of the film production…”

“While all bid good-bye to Gloucester last night, there was a general expression of a desire to return and several of the company said that they intended to return here next summer for the vacation period if not in picture work.”

“The explosion was a heavy one and its shock was felt in all parts of the city. It shook the windows of houses on Mt. Vernon Street and vicinity, also at East Gloucester and as far as Rockport. It occurred at 4:20 o’clock and people who felt the shock readily attributed it to the blow-up of Salt Island.”

photo caption: Bride 13 star Marguerite Clayton and kids on vacation during filming of Bride 13. Background shows the stately castle film set on Salt Island

film set castle on salt island good harbor beach gloucester ma- Mary McAvoy with sons

1923 The Silent Command

Then and now: filmmakers love Gloucester.

Fox Film Corporation returned to film the patriotic silent era Navy spy film, THE SILENT COMMAND on Good Harbor Beach, again on the Briar/Brier neck side.

The Silent Commander filed on Good Harbor Beach Salt Island

1923 was a busy year for Gloucester, MA. In addition to the municipality managing the bustling tercentenary, Gloucester welcomed another major Fox movie production to shoot on location at Good Harbor Beach. The film was made in cooperation with the Navy. It was directed by J Gordon Edwards, and starred Edmund Lowe and Bela Lugosi in his first American film. It’s essentially a spy thriller with a honeypot formula: foreign power attempts to secure plans to the Panama Canal and blow it up. The villains are thwarted by the US Navy. The production required assistance from the city’s fire department and city electrician. The film crew stayed in Gloucester at the Harbor View Hotel and the Savoy. Local people were cast and spectators lined the beach to watch the thrilling production.

BEFORE CGI:

I love this excerpt from the Gloucester Daily Times describing the staged wreck and tremendous waves washing the crew (stuntmen and Gloucester locals) overboard:

“A crowd of several hundred thronged the (Good Harbor) beach for the picture taking and enjoyed the proceedings, which were interesting, and at times thrilling…The Good Harbor beach setting is a clever contrivance, and constructed to produce a natural rocking motion of a steamer in a heavy sea. The rocking is produced by four winches operated by a crew of 10 men…Storm scenes were filmed yesterday afternoon with local actors, Stuart Cooney, son of Marion J. Cooney, taking the part of the hero and making a thrilling climb into the rigging to the crow’s nest during the height of the storm. Fred Kolstee, a rigger, commanded the crew of the steamer. The crew were (locals) Alfred Marshall, Tony Amero, Tom Bess, Peter Rice, James Francis, James Whittle and William Byers. Rain was produced from lines of hose, and a most realistic effect was produced by two aeroplanes, the wind from the speeding propellors driving the water about, and rushing through the rattlings and rigging with all the vengeance of a real gale at sea. Three times the big tank of water was released and the thousands of gallons broke over the deck in a most thrilling manner. There was some concern among the movie men before the water was released that some of the men might get buffeted about and get hurt, and they were cautioned to hold on tight.

However, it was a mere trifle for Gloucestermen, veterans of many a gale on the banks.

It was best expressed by Alfred Marshall when he stepped toward the ladder to leave the craft after the picture taking was done. Alfred was quite vexed. “Blankety, blankety, blank___, is this the best you can do? Blank, I’ve bailed bigger seas than that out of a dory. And he sung it right out so all could hear, too.”

Stuart Cooney ensured that the movie was a success from a technical perspective and “purchased the outfit and (took) it over” after the filming finished. He was a Gloucester pioneer in the film industry that’s still going strong. Film Cape Ann facilitates bringing local productions here, like the award winning Manchester by the Sea.  The Wikipedia page doesn’t have any mention of Gloucester, but it helped me with an illustration for The Silent Command lobby poster.

1923 silent FOX movie The Silent Command filmed on location Good Harbor Beach Gloucester MA

See for yourself; here’s a link to the complete movie. A few of the Gloucester scenes (not all) 1:03:44, 1:08:54, 1:09:54 (some coast), 1:10:21,  1:10:52 (dory lowered from navy ship), 1:11:12 (beach island)

AFI for TCM brief synopsis: “This is one of those ‘Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean’ pictures. Full of the ‘Star-Spangled Banner,’ patriotic to the nth degree with the navy floating all over the screen. A real hero, a vamp, and a flock of thrills.” (from Var review.) Foreign agents, determined to destroy the United States Navy’s Atlantic Fleet and the Panama Canal, after an unsuccessful attempt to obtain from Capt. Richard Decatur information regarding mine positions in the Canal Zone, hire adventuress Peg Williams to vamp Captain Decatur, thereby putting him at their mercy. Decatur, advised by the Chief of Naval Intelligence, plays along with the spies to gain their confidence. He leaves his wife and is dismissed from the Navy as a result of his association with Miss Williams. Finally, he goes to Panama, thwarts the saboteurs, saves the fleet and the canal, and gains honorable reinstatement and the gratitude of his country for his heroism.”

1940s

Guy Parsons used one of the old family fishing shacks as a summer place

1950s

By now the fishing shacks were no longer visible

1952

Parson family sold Salt Island

1959

James Kimball purchased Salt Island for $2000

1972

Yankee Magazine article about Bride Number 13 Lights! Camera! Disaster! by Joseph E. Garland

1979

Gloucester Daily Times article mentions that James Kimball “has no plans for the island, although in the past he has thought of building a summer home on the island. When I was young my family spent their summers on Brier Neck…So when the island became available I jumped at the chance.”

2000

One of  the designated “Special places in Gloucester”

2005

“Special places in Gloucester” appendix list for the MA Heritage Landscape Inventory Program, MA Dept of Conservation and Recreation Essex National Heritage

September 7, 2011

GMG abou the Filming of Bride 13 on Salt Island by Fred Bodin

“Where is this film? I’d love to know. All sources indicate that Bride 13 was either lost or destroyed, as happened with many silent films. The reference used for this post was the May 1972 Yankee Magazine article, Lights! Camera! Disaster!, authored by the late Joseph E. Garland of Gloucester.”

and September 9, 2011 GMG Filming of Bride 13 on Salt Island Fred Buck Cape Ann Museum adds photos from the location filming 

2013

Salt Island listed for sale $300,000 plus beach parking passes for the family

2017

Salt Island listed For Sale $750,000

September 2017 Cape Ann Beacon

Sept 1 Cape Ann Beacon “Salt Island is for Sale” by Jason Brisbois

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2017 BOSTON GLOBE

Today’s paper: Sept 16 Boston Globe “A Gem or a Rock: For $750,000 Salt Island Could Be Yours” by Billy Baker

“If somebody buys it and builds, it’s because these guys didn’t step up to the plate and protect it the way my father did when I was a little girl, ” said Maslow, who pointed out that she and her siblings are not rich people with big summer houses. “I can’t help it if someone buys it and paints it purple and puts pigs on it.” – Karen Maslow

“…this island has been available for public use informally for generations thanks to the goodwill of that family. That point should not be lost.” — Chris LaPointe, Essex County Greenbelt

Boston Globe Sept 16 2017 Salt Island for sale

Trulia listing for Salt Island exclaims “Showings available only at low tide!”

 

Boston Globe on Cape Ann Museum Gloucester MA Rockbound art exhibition!

Here’s the link (plus some installation photos) to the Boston Globe Cate McQuaid review of Cape Ann Museum’s wonderful exhibition “Rockbound: Painting the American Scene on Cape Ann and Along the Shore” (on view through October 29) and “The Importance of Place: A Sketchbook of Drawings by Stuart Davis”. 

I’ve included some installation shots of the show that I took in June, and will write more about this must see exhibition. The paintings are superbly displayed and most were generously lent from private collections else we wouldn’t have a chance to see them!

Boston Globe Cate McQuaid review Cape Ann Museum Rock Bound 2017

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Gloucester beaches in the Boston Globe | Officer Al D’Angelo, Jack Doyle, Bob Ryan, & Heidi Dallin SHINE!

Ways to beat the traffic and work around MBTA closures– Bob Ryan (General Manager Cape Ann Transportation Authority) and Heidi Dallin (Gloucester Stage and so much more) are such incredible Gloucester–and greater Cape Ann– ambassadors.

Enjoyable read-

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Boston Globe article by Hattie Bernstein  “Heading to the Beach this Weekend? Here’s Some Parking Tips” 

CATA Stage Fort Park trolley shuttle Park N Ride 

Gloucester Harbor Water Shuttle  and lighthouse tours

MR. SWAN IN THE BOSTON GLOBE!

Mr. Swan super stressed and panting while being chased around Henry’s Pond.

Mr. Swan Makes the Big Time in the Boston Globe!

In Rockport, Chasing Mr. Swan

Article by Boston Globe correspondent Emily Sweeney

Photos courtesy Kim Smith

A popular swan at Henry’s Pond in Rockport managed to stay one step ahead of rescuers who were trying to capture him Tuesday.

The elderly bird, known affectionately as “Mr. Swan,” has been a common sight at the pond for many years. During that time, he’s fathered many cygnets and outlived two of his mates, and led a peaceful existence on the water.

But things took a turn recently when Mr. Swan hurt his leg. Although he could still swim, some people began to notice that Mr. Swan was having difficulty walking. And they began to worry.

Soon enough, the Animal Rescue League was called in to help.

“The swan is considered a community pet, so the goal was to capture it, have it treated, and then returned to the pond,” said Michael DeFina, a spokesman for the Animal Rescue League.

While that mission sounds simple, carrying it out proved to be anything but. Catching Mr. Swan turned out to be an impossible task for the organization’s rescue team. Armed with large nets, the two rescuers — Bill Tanguay and Mark Vogel — used kayaks to pursue Mr. Swan on the water. At one point, Vogel almost caught Mr. Swan in his net, but the bird was able to break free.

Mr. Swan eventually sought refuge in the reeds, and the rescuers decided to call off the chase.

“The swan was stressed, and the soaring temperatures made him very tired,” said DeFina. “The fact he eluded capture and was able to swim without showing obvious signs of pain led to the conclusion that the injury may not be that severe.”

“After giving up the chase, ARL and the concerned parties agreed to continually monitor the swan’s condition, and if it worsens, ARL will be contacted to get the swan medical attention, and again, have him returned to the pond,” DeFina said.

Kim Smith, a Gloucester resident who counts herself among one of Mr. Swan’s many fans, described the rescue attempt as a “wild swan chase.”

“He was chased back and forth across the pond,” she said.

What made his escape even more impressive is Mr. Swan’s age. According to Smith, sightings of Mr. Swan date back to the early 1990s, which would make him at least 27 years old. (Smith knows Mr. Swan well: she’s spent the past six years filming him for a documentary film.)

“He’s an amazing creature,” she said.

DeFina said that the average lifespan for a swan in the wild can be about 10 to 15 years due to the hazards they can encounter (getting caught in fishing gear, getting hit by a boat, etc.), while a swan living in a protected environment can live 20 to 30 years.

“It’s clear that there are certainly people in Gloucester who care for this swan, if he’s in fact been around that long,” DeFina said.

Smith said that although the Animal Rescue League’s efforts were well-intentioned, she’s happy that Mr. Swan eluded capture.

“He’s lived this long, he deserves to spend his last days in his own neighborhood with his friends,” she said.

Long live Mr. Swan.

Emily Sweeney can be reached atesweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter@emilysweeney.

BOSTON GLOBE: GLOUCESTER’S PASTAIO VIA CORTA DANIELLE GLANTZ!!

Congratulations to Danielle for the terrific article in the Boston Globe. We’re so fortunate to have Danielle and her amazing pasta (and other deliciousness) shop!!

Danielle Glantz makes pasta in 10 to 12 shapes each day at her shop, Pastaio Via Corta, in Gloucester. PHOTO BY JINTARA NUTPRASAS