FOR OUR FATHERS collaboration | soprano Ute Gfrerer & mixed media artist Lisa Rosowsky at Gloucester Meetinghouse April 28 co-sponsored by Temple Ahavat Achim

UU Church

UU and Temple Gloucester MA

press release for upcoming program:

FOR OUR FATHERS, Sunday, April 28, 2019 7:30pm, at the Gloucester Meetinghouse: acclaimed Austrian soprano Ute Gfrerer, accompanied by pianist William Merrill, and renowned Boston artist Lisa Rosowsky present a deeply moving evening of song and art, based on the legacy of silence of their two fathers during World War II, one an Austrian member of the Nazi Youth Party, and one a French Jew. In a unique collaboration, the two artists present a Holocaust-themed program of music and mixed media artworks, based on memories of their fathers.  The event is co-hosted with Temple Ahavat Achim. The Meetinghouse (home of the Unitarian Universalist Church) is located on the green at the corner of Middle and Church Streets (accessible side entrance at 10 Church Street with an elevator).  Tickets ($45 preferred, $30 general, $10 students with ID, under 12 free) are available at the door and in-advance with more information at gloucestermeetinghouse.org

About the program from the artist, Lisa Rosowsky: 

When we met in 2017, Ute had already developed a repertoire of musical performances incorporating music that had been set to poems by writers caught up in the Holocaust, and for more than a decade I had been creating mixed media works of art around being the daughter of a survivor. We knew we wanted to find a way to weave together our work into an audio-visual program, and it became my task to craft the presentation. We were amazed by how many of her songs matched up thematically with my pieces! Our goal was to move the audience seamlessly between each song and each work of art, setting both into historical context while offering insight into our individual experiences with our fathers. Over the course of a few months, we developed this performance, which we are pleased to share with you.

Benefit event:  This event is co-sponsored by Temple Ahavat Achim with support from the Paulson Fund, by the Series Sponsors of the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation, and by the Massachusetts Cultural Council.  Proceeds will be used to benefit the ongoing preservation of the historic (1806) Meetinghouse as well as to support Temple Ahavat Achim’s Rabbi Myron and Eileen Geller Endowment Campaign for the Sylvia Cohen Religious School and Family Learning

ForOurFathersPoster.jpg

Esther Pullman exhibition reception Saturday April 13th Cape Ann Museum

Esther Pullman Marshall's Farm Stand Greenhouse Storm Fans and Cat 2006 (2)Esther Pullman Marshall's Farm Stand Greenhouse Storm Fans and Cat 2006

news from Cape Ann Museum

ESTHER PULLMAN

Green Places/Green Spaces/Greenhouses

April 13 – June 16, 2019

OPENING RECEPTION Saturday, April 13, 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Join artist Esther Pullman for the opening of an exhibition of her large-scale panoramic photographs. Reception is free for Cape Ann Museum members or with Museum admission. Shot over a twenty-year period, these large-scale panoramic photographs of greenhouses explore such universal themes as the passage of time, the cycle of the seasons, death and rebirth, and have also unavoidably become a metaphor for our threatened planet.

EXHIBITION-RELATED PROGRAMS

While you’re at it marking your calendars

Pullman’s work is featured in two openings on Pleasant Street on April 13th and it’s easy to schedule both!

Pullman’s work is included in a group show, A Turning Poing: the Contemporary Landscape, at Jane Deering Gallery, which represents her work. The gallery is located next to the museum. The show is opening the same day:

Venue: Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester, Mass.
Group show: A Turning Poing | The Contemporary Landscape
Artists: Gabrielle Barzaghi, Paul Cary Goldberg, Tom Fels, Jacob Hessler, Jeff Marshall, Adin Murray, Esther Pullman, Steve Rosenthal and Erma Wheeler from New England; Nell Campbell, Gail Pine and Young Suh from California; Gail Barker, Neeta Madahar and Michael Porter from the United Kingdom
Opening Reception: Saturday April 13, 4:00-6:00pm

Saturday April 13th art show opening ‘A Turning Point | the contemporary landscape’ Jane Deering Gallery #GloucesterMA

Venue: Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester, Mass.
Group show: A Turning Poing | The Contemporary Landscape
Artists: Gabrielle Barzaghi, Paul Cary Goldberg, Tom Fels, Jacob Hessler, Jeff Marshall, Adin Murray, Esther Pullman, Steve Rosenthal and Erma Wheeler from New England; Nell Campbell, Gail Pine and Young Suh from California; Gail Barker, Neeta Madahar and Michael Porter from the United Kingdom
Opening Reception: Saturday April 13, 4:00-6:00pm

Courtesy photographs

Esther Pullman . 'Wood' 2016 . Archival Pigment Print . 7x5.5 inches
Esther Pullman

Read more information about this spring exhibition here

jdg2

 

Jane Deering Gallery presents A Turning Point | the contemporary landscape group show art reception Saturday April 13th

GBarzaghi . Rocks and Trees 2012 . Pastel on Stenhenge paper . 19x25 inches.JPG
Artist: Gabrielle Barzaghi of Gloucester. Title of art work: Rocks and Trees 2012 pastel on paper

Jane Deering Gallery presents A Turning Point | the contemporary landscape with an opening reception Saturday April 13th from 4:00-6:00pm.  The exhibition addresses the timely question Beautiful world, where are you going? and explores our fragile relationship with the natural world. The exhibition will run through mid-June and includes regional and international artists whose works are held in museum, corporate and private collections: Gabrielle Barzaghi, Tom Fels, Jacob Hessler, Jeff Marshall, Adin Murray, Esther Pullman, Steve Rosenthal from New England; Nell Campbell, Gail Pine and Youngsuk Suh from California; Gail Barker, Neeta Madahar and Michael Porter from the United Kingdom. The gallery is located at 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester MA.  Gallery hours: Friday/Saturday/Sunday 1:00-5:00pm and by appointment at 917-902-4359 or info@janedeeringgallery.com.

Contact:
Jane Deering
Jane Deering Gallery
917-902-4359
info@janedeeringgallery.com

Scenes from Paige Farrell solo exhibition at Jane Deering Gallery

The exhibition Paige Farrell | Relationships at Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester MA continues through February 27th. Selections from Farrell’s writings are paired with her closely observed motifs, some man made, some natural. The sense of place whether the weather or locale becomes all Farrell– often soft, atmospheric and peaceful. 

Scenes from the reception 

 

 

 

NEA allocates 27 million and the winning arts applicants are…

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) 2019 grant recipients were announced this month. Poetry was competitive.

  • For the NEA 2019 Artworks 972 of 1605 eligible grants were funded (ranging from $10,000-$100,00 totaling more than $25 million)
  • For the NEA 2019 Challenge America 138 of 221 eligible applications to receive $10,000 each for a total of $1.38 million
  • For the NEA 2019 Creative Writing Fellowships in poetry–  35 of 1700 eligible applicants (none having won an NEA fellowship before) to receive $25,000 each. “Visit the Arts Endowment’s Literature Fellowships webpage to read excerpts by and features on past Creative Writing Fellows and recipients of Literature Fellowships for translation projects.”

Comparison by state from N. Dakota 1 grant $30,000 to NYC 252 grants 6.8 million

NEA 2019 grant awards state comparison © catherine Ryan.jpg
NEA 2019 grant awards popped into chart comparison©catherine ryan

 

Here are the details for Massachusetts 40 grants totaling $1,085,000. In 2019 there were three projects awarded on the North Shore: RAW Beverly; Decordova Museum; and PYD in Somerville. Continue reading “NEA allocates 27 million and the winning arts applicants are…”

Artist, writer, sommelier- PAIGE FARRELL | RELATIONSHIPS photography exhibit at Jane Deering Gallery #GloucesterMA

Don’t miss evocative pairings Paige Farrell solo exhibition

PFarrell . Untitled 2018 . Archival pigment print . 8x10 inches IMG_9404

 

PFarrell . Untitled 2018 . Archival pigment print . 10x8 inches IMG_2656

 

The exhibition Paige Farrell | Relationships will be at Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester MA through February 27th with a reception on Saturday February 23rd from 4:00-6:30pm. Farrell (writer, sommelier, and wine consultant) reveals the relationship between the world of two arts — the art of photography and the art of the grape. Her monthly wine column appears in Northshore Magazine, and she writes for The SOMM Journal, Boston Wine School, Winestone, and Reservoir and Wollaston Wine & Spirits. Farrell will be traveling to Valencia, Spain in March as the official wine correspondent for the Boston press, then to the Champagne region in France. Farrell holds a BA in French from the University of Massachusetts Amherst with studies at Paris-Sorbonne University, Paris, France and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Presently, she is a Diploma Candidate with the prestigious Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET). Gallery hours: Saturday and Sunday 12noon-5:00pm and by appointment at farrellpaige@gmail.com

Cape Ann Museum names new Museum Director!

Cape Ann Museum_20181219_© catherine ryan.jpgNews from Cape Ann Museum:

For the past 17 years, Ronda Faloon has been a constant champion for the Cape Ann Museum. During her tenure as Executive Director she has guided us through a period of tremendous growth. She has expanded our facilities, grown our visitation and membership and elevated the role that the Cape Ann Museum plays within our community. She has advanced our mission and made the Cape Ann Museum a truly special place.

When Ronda first announced that she would retire in the spring of 2019, the Board of Directors formed a Search Committee, co-chaired by Board members Henrietta Gates and Suzi Natti. The Board also engaged the services of a nationally recognized firm that specializes in museum related executive searches. The Search Committee was focused on identifying an individual who would understand and appreciate who we are as an organization and would have the ability to guide us through the implementation of our Strategic Plan 2018-2023.

Inquiries and applications were received from all over the country. The Search Committee met and reviewed many candidates who were evaluated based on their ability to serve the needs of the Museum, our membership and our community. 

I am pleased to announce that the search has been successful.

Effective April 1, 2019 Oliver Barker will become Director of the Cape Ann Museum.

Oliver joins us from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston where he supervises a portfolio of fundraising and international engagements and is responsible for developing partnerships with foundations, corporations and governments. Prior to joining the MFA, Oliver worked as Curator & Project Director for the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. He began his career as the Director of Education & Visitor Services for the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy where he lived for nearly a decade. Oliver holds a master’s degree in Arts and Cultural Management from the University of Melbourne and an Honors Degree in Fine Arts, Painting and Printmaking from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), in Melbourne, Australia.

Oliver has deep family ties in Gloucester* and has been a frequent visitor to the Cape Ann Museum for 20 years. He lives in Wenham with his wife and children.

I am confident that you will enjoy meeting Oliver and getting to know him. He is a thoughtful, respectful and charismatic leader who has the ability and perspective required to guide us through the next chapter of our own story.

Thank you for your continued support of the Museum. I look forward to seeing you at one of the Museum’s many great events this year, including Homer at the Beach: A Marine Painter’s Journey, 1869-1880, opening in August.

Sincere regards,

Charles D. Esdaile

President, Board of Directors

*Lundbergs

Patriots hype | It’s on! MFA Boston vs the J Paul Getty 3pm today #MuseumBowl twitter showdown

Over the past few years, museums join in the Super Bowl spirit via trash talk on social media accounts. From humorous challenges and clever collection puns it’s morphed into big stake art bets for Super Bowl contenders: Some wins have triggered a museum loan from the losing city’s rival fine arts institution. Yesterday (see below) the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced a twitter showdown with the J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. Look for #MuseumBowl and @mfaboston and @GettyMuseum. It’s going down at 3pm TODAY, Friday, Feb 1, 2019. I don’t know if there’s a wager but I hope so! It’s great fun no matter what.

The MFA makes good use of their archives dog, Riley.

 

MFA Boston twitter account Museum Bowl 2019

now theyre cooking

we want the Getty famous painting Hans Hoffman Hare.jpg

Architectural plans for the Cape Ann Museum curatorial center at White Ellery property by the Babson house

Signs of clearing for the exciting Cape Ann Museum addition for a curatorial center on the White-Ellery property January 2019 Gloucester, Massachusetts

Enjoy comparing plans and photos plus a link to a higher resolution PDF of new groundscape single page from the architectural plans

cape ann museum curatorial archives center white ellery campus

 

babson house next to white ellery barn and new cape ann museum curatorial and archives center_20190127_© catherine ryan

behind and around babson clearing for cape ann museum_ new fence_20190127_© catherine ryan

today new fence and visibility (above) vs google (below) old fence & more overgrowth…there is forsythia along there

google still showing old fence and overgrowth.jpg

cape ann museum clearing for archive curatorial center _20190127_© catherine ryan
from Poplar (Babson straight back, White Ellery and Barn to the right)
from poplar side_gravel access_new sewer_cape ann museum_20190127_© catherine ryan
Poplar (gravel access)

In the news: as #GloucesterMA Annisquam River Bridge readies for MBTA rebuild – is there time for design?

I don’t suggest that the treacherous bridge needs to be “preserved” or want to impede progress. However, I believe there is still time to repeat my pleas (since 2012). Great design impacts future investment. Is there a small way that the design can tip its hat to Edward Hopper, Gloucester, and New England for this landmark and beacon for Cape Ann, this cherished vista across the Great Marsh?

See GMG POST September 9, 2017 for design nod aesthetic suggestions (rather than structural) The budget is good!  “Does the MBTA new design for the Annisquam River Bridge look like a prison tower to you?” 

Here’s how the bridge and new condos looked November 9, 2018 (double click to enlarge photos from the wordpress mosaic format)

 

 

January 8, 2019 article by Ray Lamont Gloucester Daily project. “READYING FOR REBUILD”

the design plans illustrated are the same as published previously

gloucester daily times ray lamont coverage new annisquam commuter bridge january 2019

catherine-ryan-identifying-edward-hopper-annisquam-river-bridge.jpg

 

TODAY – Reminder Cape Ann Museum Crane beach talk 3pm

courtesy photo for cape ann museum_0448 © t. barrieau the trustees

photo credit: T. Barrieau/The Trustees

Courtney Richardson at the Cape Ann Museum shares information about an upcoming special event at the museum:

Lecture – Life on the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach, Saturday Jan. 19th, 3PM

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with The Trustees, is pleased to present a lecture about the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach with ecologist Jeff Denoncour. This program is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach. This program is free for Museum members, Trustees members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10. 

When one thinks of Crane Beach, the sea, sun, and sand might be the first things that come to mind. But how did the forces of nature create the stunning landscape? What’s special about this incredible barrier beach and marshlands it protects? How do The Trustees protect special places and care for our vulnerable coast? Join Jeff Denoncour, an ecologist with The Trustees, for a dive into the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach, how they protect our coastal resources, and examples of success stories resulting from their work.

Jeff Denoncour is the Eastern Region Ecologist with The Trustees where he manages and monitors ecological resources on its properties in Eastern Massachusetts. Jeff grew up on Cape Ann and has spent most of his life living along the coast. He has 11 years of experience managing rare and endangered shorebirds that nest on beaches. For the past eight years, he has been managing the Shorebird Protection Program on Crane Beach, as well as other natural resources that make the Crane Beach such a treasured place.

This program is offered in conjunction with Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach a special exhibition of the paintings of Dorothy “Doffie” Arnold.  The works on view at the Cape Ann Museum offer an ever changing vista of Crane Beach as observed across Ipswich Bay from Arnold’s studio in Bay View (Gloucester). Painted in the 1980s, these acrylics on paper are part of larger series of works by Arnold that take as their subject the intersection of water, land and light viewed from a single vantage point over a period of years. With a low horizon line, a sky that is often turbulent and waters that range from placid to racing, the paintings reflect the strong influence of nature on the artist and her work.

A 1980 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Dorothy Arnold maintained studios in Cambridge and Gloucester. While much of her work is large scale, the Crane Beach paintings measure just 11×15 inches. Her work, which includes landscapes, still lives, figure studies and abstractions, was the subject of an international retrospective in 2001–2003. It was Arnold’s wish to exhibit her art locally in an effort to strengthen the community’s appreciation of the culture and traditions of the area.

cape ann museum flyer for life on the edge the ecology of crane beach special lecture in collaboration with the trustees_during dorothy arnold exhibition jan 2019

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “TODAY – Reminder Cape Ann Museum Crane beach talk 3pm”

Public Art happiness is … Renowned Williamstown Art Conservation Center caring for historic Gloucester murals!

Thanks to Mayor Romeo-Theken, city officials & departments and staff, residents, volunteers, archives and generous grant awards & donations, — Gloucester’s extant historic mural collection has begun a new chapter and is beginning to receive most fitting care at the illustrious Williamstown Art Conservation Center!

Williamstown Art Conservation teams commence work for Gloucester MA_on its historic mural many WPA era _20180510_© Catherine Ryan.jpg
WACC conservation teams on the ground in Gloucester, MA, 2018

 

Located on the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute campus, The Williamstown Art Conservation Center​ (WACC) is a non-profit institution that was established as the regional conservation center for New England by the US government back in 1977.

WACC_20180620_© catherine ryan.jpg
The Williamstown Art Conservation Center is located on the campus of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts. (architect Tadao Ando)

 

The summer 2017 issue of Art Conservator, WACC’s indispensable industry magazine, ​focused on the center’s 40th anniversary milestone and Director Tom Branchick. The back page prints the 2017 Center consortium members.

 

williamstown art conservation center member consortium 2017
Gloucester Massachusetts art collection stands with important American collections and just might be the first municipality on this list!~

You can peruse the issue here or follow the link to explore a complete digitized repository of current and past issues. The WACC website URL is: www.williamstownart.org

 

Conservators at the center assessed the condition  and performed necessary triage because of the invaluable support from the city’s Community Preservation Act (CPA). CPA funding and Williamstown Art Conservation Center’s stature are inspiring endorsements for broadcasting the project and compelling additional financial support. As money is raised, every mural will have its necessary care regimen completed. Donations in support of the mural care can be sent c/o the Auditor’s Office, City of Gloucester, 9 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, MA (note mural restoration). All murals will be displayed in Gloucester as soon as their care is completed.

Sneak peek then and now:

The former Eastern Avenue School (85 Eastern Avenue) was the site for the monumental mural, Schooldays, by Frederick L. Stoddard, from 1936.  This multi-panel triptych was painted 8 feet high and nearly 60 feet long despite an array of unusual architectural challenges. My hunch for its original location on the main floor was confirmed thanks to Barbara Tarr. I’m looking for interior photos of the school that show the mural installed. Over time the school walls were resurfaced, doors blocked, and an elevator installed. Based on my expertise, I recognized that a stand alone piece was misattributed and must have been dispersed, not as bad as the scarecrow in the Wizard of Oz after the flying monkeys descend-… still it was dire and will be amazing to have it whole once again! Special thanks go to Gloucester’s Department of Public Works.

catherine ryan correct attribution and rediscovery for major and amazing frederick l stoddard gloucester ma 1936 mural © catherine ryan

 

 

 

 

Mary Rhinelander McCarl art exhibition at Matz Gallery

Don’t miss Mary Rhinelander McCarl’s floral still lifes on display January 2019 at the Matz Gallery, Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library.

from the printed matter:

“Mary Rhinelander McCarl- Mary, a Gloucester resident, draws her artistic inspiration from the scenery of Cape Ann. In her youth, she studied both sculpture and figure drawing with George Demetrios. She has worked under the guidance of Juni Van Dyke in the Art Room of the Rose Baker Senior Center and studied watercolors with Susie Field. At present Mary uses her training as an archivist to transcribe and edit the papers of Samuel Elwell Sawyer, Gloucester’s great philanthropist and art collector.”

FREE youth and family program at Cape Ann Museum Saturday morning!

 

Once Upon a Contest Selections from Cape Ann Reads opening at Cape Ann Museum_January 5 2019 Gloucester MA (2).jpg

 

 

 

Stop by Cape Ann Museum Saturday morning January 12th from 10:00 a.m to 12:00 p.m for a fun reception!  As part of CAM Kids Second Saturday series, explore the inventive worlds of children’s books in the special exhibitions on view this winter: The Little House: Her Story and Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads! Meet some of the writers and artists featured in the exhibit, enjoy light refreshments, draw & color, explore the gallery with a “Seek & Find” and more!

 

 

 

Also look for Story Time in the Gallery each Wednesday through March!

cape ann reads-print

walking to a world of new books at cape ann museum_once upon a contest_20181222_©catherine ryan

Cape Ann Museum & The Trustees present “Life On the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach” Jeff Denoncour lecture

courtesy photo for cape ann museum_0448 © t. barrieau the trustees

photo credit: T. Barrieau/The Trustees

Courtney Richardson at the Cape Ann Museum shares information about an upcoming special event at the museum:

Lecture – Life on the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach, Saturday Jan. 19th, 3PM

The Cape Ann Museum, in collaboration with The Trustees, is pleased to present a lecture about the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach with ecologist Jeff Denoncour. This program is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach. This program is free for Museum members, Trustees members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. Reservations required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10. 

When one thinks of Crane Beach, the sea, sun, and sand might be the first things that come to mind. But how did the forces of nature create the stunning landscape? What’s special about this incredible barrier beach and marshlands it protects? How do The Trustees protect special places and care for our vulnerable coast? Join Jeff Denoncour, an ecologist with The Trustees, for a dive into the natural history and ecological significance of Crane Beach, how they protect our coastal resources, and examples of success stories resulting from their work.

Jeff Denoncour is the Eastern Region Ecologist with The Trustees where he manages and monitors ecological resources on its properties in Eastern Massachusetts. Jeff grew up on Cape Ann and has spent most of his life living along the coast. He has 11 years of experience managing rare and endangered shorebirds that nest on beaches. For the past eight years, he has been managing the Shorebird Protection Program on Crane Beach, as well as other natural resources that make the Crane Beach such a treasured place.

This program is offered in conjunction with Sky/Horizon/Light: Perspectives on Crane Beach a special exhibition of the paintings of Dorothy “Doffie” Arnold.  The works on view at the Cape Ann Museum offer an ever changing vista of Crane Beach as observed across Ipswich Bay from Arnold’s studio in Bay View (Gloucester). Painted in the 1980s, these acrylics on paper are part of larger series of works by Arnold that take as their subject the intersection of water, land and light viewed from a single vantage point over a period of years. With a low horizon line, a sky that is often turbulent and waters that range from placid to racing, the paintings reflect the strong influence of nature on the artist and her work.

A 1980 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Dorothy Arnold maintained studios in Cambridge and Gloucester. While much of her work is large scale, the Crane Beach paintings measure just 11×15 inches. Her work, which includes landscapes, still lives, figure studies and abstractions, was the subject of an international retrospective in 2001–2003. It was Arnold’s wish to exhibit her art locally in an effort to strengthen the community’s appreciation of the culture and traditions of the area.

cape ann museum flyer for life on the edge the ecology of crane beach special lecture in collaboration with the trustees_during dorothy arnold exhibition jan 2019

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum & The Trustees present “Life On the Edge: The Ecology of Crane Beach” Jeff Denoncour lecture”

Ellen F. Kenny from Mass Center for the Book, Mayor Romeo-Theken, & Justine Vitale share photos from Once Upon a Contest at Cape Ann Museum

Stop by and meet some of the participants featured in Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads at a special Cape Ann Museum CAM KIDS second Saturdays family activity on January 12, 2019, from 10AM-12PM. Later that same day, artists Mary Rhinelander and Julia Garrison are offering a printmaking linocut demo related to the Folly Cove designers and the major Virginia Lee Burton The Little House Her Story exhibition!

Thanks to the four public libraries of Cape Ann and Cape Ann Museum, Once Upon a Contest: Selections from Cape Ann Reads is a testament to the imagination and immense artistic talent of artists and authors. Below are photographs from the first reception for the exhibit at Cape Ann Museum January 5, 2019.

Courtesy photos from Ellen F. Kenny, Mass Center for the Book. Thank you for capturing the spirit of the reception at Cape Ann Museum! Mass Center for the Book Facebook [Folks featured in the big group shot from L-R: Anna Vojtech (Artist-Author), Claire Wyzenbeek (Artist-Author), Jean Woodbury (Author), Christina Ean Spangler (Artist), Maura Wadlinger (Author), Juni VanDyke (Artist), John Plunkett, Martha Geraghty ( Author), Barbara McLaughlin (Artist-Author)]

 

The Cape Ann Museum reception was beautiful. Everybody from the museum is so welcoming. The courtesy photos below document the start of the reception from Mayor Romeo Theken, Justine Vitale, and others. See Kim Smith’s photos from later in the afternoon and from another visit here! We’re so grateful to have a record of this joyous time. The show continues at Cape Ann Museum through February 24 before traveling throughout Cape Ann in 2019.

Installation view Once Upon a Contest at Cape Ann Museum December 2018.jpg

 

View and/or print out the Once upon a contest selections from cape ann reads trifold brochure. It’s paginated at 6pp but can be assembled like so:

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, message about the superpower of art & culture

December 2018 looking ahead:

“We are on the front lines of a war on poverty. Not necessarily a shortage of material wealth, although its distribution in America is both a consequence and contributor to the current distress.

The poverty our field confronts every day is that which Robert Kennedy confronted while running for President in 1968. He contrasted the wealth represented in the nation’s gross national product with the wealth necessary to sustain a democracy and make life worth living. 

He said, “…the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

We are currently in one of the best economies in a generation, but studies show record declines in our sense of well-being. Worse yet, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. Major newspapers are sounding the alarm. In the Washington Post, George Will writes that loneliness, a major public health problem, is in “epidemic proportions” and that people are unhappier, more isolated and less fulfilled. David Brooks claims, in the New York Times, the biggest factor is the crisis of connection. We are “in a straight-up social catastrophe,” he writes. 
 
For nearly the last 20 years, those of us who advocate for the arts and culture have made the economy the centerpiece of our argument. We’ve collected economic impact data, counted the jobs we create and the taxes we generate, and touted our centrality to the tourism industry. We became the poster child of the creative economy. In an environment of it’s the economy stupid, these arguments won over state legislators and delivered budget increases to state arts agencies.

Five years ago, I wrote a column for a national arts blog suggesting that it was time to dial back the economic argument, even suggesting that there is something powerful about the intrinsic value of the arts. That the transforming power of culture is the power of creative expression, human engagement, and empathy. 

This is the poverty of our time. When Kennedy spoke of joy, beauty, intelligence, integrity, wit, wisdom, courage, compassion, and devotion he spoke of the ideals that are inherent in art and culture.

The arts and culture are the antidote to what ails us as a nation. In fact, they can both prevent and cure. Studies show that creative and cultural participation enhances human health and well-being leading to: reduced social isolation; opportunities for learning; calming experiences and decreased anxiety; more optimism, hope and enjoyment; increased self-esteem and sense of identity; increased inspiration and “meaning-making;” and better communication.

I can write about the studies and outcomes, but the heart is more articulate:
“It is a remarkable experience to witness a high school student watching a young adult with down’s syndrome or cerebral palsy offer a sonnet, and think to himself, ‘I want to do that. I want to have that kind of courage, that kind of conviction.’ Or to be a man or a woman of any age and watch someone you have typecast in your heart of hearts as somehow less than, stand in the center of a crowd and speak a truth about what it is like to dream of being seen for all of what you offer and know that a wall has just fallen…and through that kind of honest performance, know that you have been changed for the better,” writes Maria Sirois about Community Access to the Arts in Great Barrington, an organization that unleashes the arts in people with disabilities.

Music can help stroke victims regain their speech. You’re never too old to sing, or dance, or paint. Victims of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia find calm and clarity through the arts. Art is a universal language that bridges race, ethnicity, and culture – in a neighborhood, or across continents. The arts help explain the complexity of physics or climate change. Science and art are close cousins, sharing the bloodlines of creativity, risk taking, and problem solving.
 
Massachusetts cultural organizations are committed to serving everybody in the Commonwealth. They joined a new program this year to offer the benefits only the arts and culture can provide to people who have fallen on hard times and are receiving assistance through the state EBT card, a card that provides help to families living near the poverty level. Our organizations agreed to offer free or greatly reduced admission prices to EBT cardholders. In our first year, we tracked 220,000 EBT admissions. 

Nearly a quarter of a million doses of arts and culture to people in need. Again, the heart is in the stories. One concertgoer, who had not been able to attend a concert in years said, “It was nice to have a slice of my old life back.” Another said “It’s hard to describe the feeling of being able to do something ‘normal’ when everything else isn’t.”

The Mass Cultural Council is not an economic development agency, but when we do arts well, tourists visit and spend money, communities become destinations and better places to live, jobs are supported and created, innovators want to live here, and build new businesses.
 
The Mass Cultural Council is not an education agency, but when children have a quality experience participating in the arts, in school, and out of school, they exercise their creative minds, learn to think critically, are better observers and team players, and get a better education.

The Mass Cultural Council is not a human service agency, but when some of our most troubled youth participate in arts programs that give them a productive outlet for their fears and anger, provide a supportive community, build self-esteem and teach skills that will last a lifetime, these young people are saved from gangs, prison, drugs, even death.

In her book “Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum writes:

“Citizens cannot relate well to the complex world around them by factual knowledge and logic alone. The third ability of the citizen, closely related to the first two, is what we can call the narrative imagination. This means the ability to think what it might be like to be in the shoes of a person different from oneself, to be an intelligent reader of that person’s story, and to understand the emotions and wishes and desires that someone so placed might have.”

Martha Nussbaum is a close reader of Aristotle, who defined the good life as one that was authentically meaningfully rich: rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, great accomplishment, and enduring achievement.

George Will writes of the crumbling of America’s social infrastructure and the need for new habits of mind and heart, new practices of neighborliness. David Brooks says, “It’s not jobs, jobs, jobs anymore. It’s relationships, relationships, relationships.” Real relationships, not virtual or transactional ones. True engagement of heart and mind.

The poverty we face is one we can defeat. Novelist Alice Walker once said, “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”
 
Story. Imagination. Empathy. This is our superpower: the power of culture.” – 
Anita Walker , Executive Director, Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) 

Visit the Mass Cultural Council website

Have a podcast listen – Creative Minds Out Loud:  podcast for art and Culture –  Informative and lively conversations with arts and cultural leaders. Creative Minds Out Loud is a project of the Mass Cultural Council, and is hosted by Executive Director Anita Walker. https://creativemindsoutloud.org

 

 

Don’t miss artists Mary Rhinelander and Julia Garrison give special block printing demonstration at Cape Ann Museum

rhinelander - snow day

Blockprinting Demonstration in the Gallery

Artists Mary Rhinelander and Julia Garrison demonstrate the techniques of the Folly Cove Designers

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased present a blockprinting demonstration with artists Mary Rhinelander and Julia Garrison on Saturday, January 12 from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. These artists have long been inspired by the Folly Cove Designers. Drop by the Museum to see the Folly Cove Designers exhibition and to watch printing in action. This program is free for Museum members, Cape Ann residents or with Museum admission. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10.

Mary Rhinelander is a professional artist with an MFA in printmaking.  She has had many solo and group shows and her work is in both public and private collections. She has painted murals, designed logos and book covers, illustrated for a variety of publications, and taught students of all ages.  In 2004 she founded a fine art card business, Mermade Press. With a deep affinity for the Folly Cove Designers and Virginia Lee Burton in particular, it has been Mary’s great pleasure to bring block printing workshops into Cape Ann’s public schools with the support of CAM and the Gloucester Education Foundation. Mary will be joined by Julia Garrison, an artist with ties to Lanesville, who until recently owned and operated the Sarah Elizabeth Shop in Rockport’s Whistlestop Mall.

The Folly Cove Designers were a group of 45 designer-craftsmen who worked together between 1938 and 1969 producing carefully wrought designs cut into linoleum blocks and printed (primarily) on fabric. Their common interest was in producing solid designs and in good craftsmanship. The Folly Cove Designers was composed almost entirely of women, most being residents of Cape Ann and a majority having no artistic training prior to becoming involved in the group. They worked under the leadership of Virginia Lee Burton Demetrios, who devised a design course which she offered to her friends and neighbors in the Folly Cove neighborhood. Participants were urged by Demetrios to look to their surroundings for inspiration, to draw “what they knew” and to sketch their subjects over and over again until they made them their own. This program is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition The Little House: Her Story which takes a closer look at Virginia Lee Burton Demetrios and her award winning story, The Little House.

Mary will also be teaching a blockprinting class on Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. starting on January 23.

This custom 4-week course for adults offers the opportunity to create artwork surrounded by the inspirational work of the Folly Cove Designers. Sketch, carve linoleum blocks and print an original work to take home. Materials provided. $125 CAM members/$145 nonmembers. Space is limited, registration required.

Image credit: Snow Day. Courtesy of Mary Rhinelander.

About the Cape Ann Museum

The Cape Ann Museum has been in existence since the 1870s, working to preserve and celebrate the history and culture of the area and to keep it relevant to today’s audiences. Spanning 44,000 square feet, the Museum is one of the major cultural institutions on Boston’s North Shore welcoming more than 25,000 local, national and international visitors each year to its exhibitions and programs. In addition to fine art, the Museum’s collections include decorative art, textiles, artifacts from the maritime and granite industries, two historic homes and a sculpture park in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Visit capeannmuseum.org for details.

The Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $12.00 adults, $10.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. For more information please call: (978)283-0455 x10. Additional information can be found online at www.capeannmuseum.org.

mary rhinelander and julia garrison blockprinting demo at cape ann museum for virginia lee burton her story and folly cove designers exhibition jan 2019