Help Us Rebuild Magnolia Pier Auction

Below please find some of the items that will be part of the auction.

 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! All are welcome, whether you are a MB&T member or not!
LIVE Auction
ART Sales
Cash Bar
Light Hors d’Oeuvres
Live Music
Parking available at BOTH the MB&T AND the Magnolia Beach Corporation lots
This will be THE Social event of the YEAR! Manchester, Magnolia and Gloucester, coming together as ONE to SAVE OUR PIER

September 21, 2018

Manchester Bath and Tennis Club
27 Raymond Street
Manchester, MA  01944

 

IRON VILLAGE YOUR 2018 MEN’S SEINE BOAT CHAMPIONS!

Huge shout out to underdogs Iron Village for winning the most nail-biting, neck-in-neck, toe-to-toe men’s seine boat race ever seen in the history of the Saint Peter’s Fiesta races. Congratulations Iron Village!!!!

From our Friend Len Burgess

Gloucester SCHOONER CHALLENGE HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO JULY 9TH.

 

—DON’T MISS THIS FUN EVENT— It should be a sell-out so sign on-board early. Ticket price is tax deductible and will benefit the Essex Shipbuilding Museum.

FOR TICKETS and info: Visit the Museum’s secure website:

https://www.essexshipbuilding.org/museum-store/6th-annual-schooner-challenge

or call: (978) 768-7541 or email: chris@essexshipbuilding.org Tickets are $50.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Meeting tonight @Sawyer Free Libary

IMG_20180131_081835.jpgCommunity Development Block Grant (CDBG) Meeting

Thursday, February 8

5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Address:
Sawyer Free Library, Friend Room
2 Dale Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930

This meeting is an INFORMATIONAL PUBLIC HEARING to address any questions and explain the CDBG RFP requirements and to obtain the views of the citizens of Gloucester regarding the CDBG Program. The Grants Division of the Community Development Department will be seeking proposals from qualified organizations, agencies, or individuals for its Program Year 2018 (PY18) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. The CDBG Program is designed to promote safe, sanitary, and affordable housing, encourage handicapped accessibility, improve public facilities, support social service and job training activities, provide economic development assistance, and improve the living environment for low- and moderate-income residents of the City of Gloucester. The 2018 CDBG Program is expected to be funded through a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Funding of proposals is contingent upon receipt of funding from HUD.

BALD EAGLE SOARING OVERHEAD

Year of the Bird

The year 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, passed in 1918. The treaty is a seminal piece of legislation that has saved, and continues to save, the life of billions upon billions of North American birds. Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Geographic, Audubon, and BirdLife have created a timely alliance, joining forces this year to celebrate birds, while also raising awareness about the current dangers that they face.

I have been thinking a great deal about the Year of the Bird while out photographing and today on an early morning dune walk, a juvenile Bald Eagle flew overhead, soaring high, high up in the clouds. It was a first for me, to see a Bald Eagle, and it was simply thrilling. Bald Eagles have been helped tremendously by the stewardship allowed for under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Bald Eagle Protection Act, and the banning of DDT.

Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are one of eight species in the genus Haliaeetus, or “sea” eagles. They are the largest birds of prey in Massachusetts, with a wing span of six to seven feet. Bald Eagles were extirpated (made non-existent) from Massachusetts during the early 1900s. From 1982 to 1988, forty-one young Bald Eagles from Michigan and Canada were relocated to Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts. Eagle numbers have increased steadily since that time. In 2015 (most recent record), the highest number ever recorded, at least 51 pairs, of Bald Eagles maintained breeding territories in Massachusetts.

Why are birds so important? I can think of myriad reasons–practical, aesthetic, and personal. Practically speaking, birds are like the earth’s housekeepers. They annually eat trillions of insects and pick clean carcasses of millions of dead animals. Many species of birds are pollinators–think of hummingbirds sipping nectar from zinnias and Baltimore Orioles drinking nectar from flowering fruit trees along their northward migratory route. Birds, too, are the proverbial canary in the coal mine. The presence and abundance of birds (or lack thereof) speaks to the health of our environment.

BIRDS ARE BEAUTIFUL! They connect us to the natural world that surrounds, and everyone can enjoy their beauty. We don’t all have access to daily bear watching, elephant safaris, or whaling adventures, but everyone can look out their window or go for a hike and see a beautiful bird. Evolved from dinosaurs, but bellwethers for the future, protecting birds and their habitats ensures a healthy planet for future generations.

From AUDUBON

The History and Evolution of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

The law has already saved billions of birds’ lives. Here’s how it’s accomplished so much in its 100-year history.

Passed a century ago, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act prohibits the harming of just about all native birds, along with their nests and eggs. To this day it remains the primary tool for protecting non-endangered species. As threats to birds continue to evolve, so does the law itself.

Here’s a look back at some of the key moments in the law’s evolution to date.

1800s: With essentially zero regulations in place, market hunters decimate U.S. bird populations, in part so that well-to-do women can wear hats adorned with ornamental feathers. By the end of the century, Labrador Ducks and Great Auks are extinct, soon to be joined by Passenger Pigeons, Carolina Parakeets, and Heath Hens. Numerous other species stand on the brink. Outrage over these alarming trends leads to the formation of the first Audubon societies, as well as other conservation groups.

1900: Congress passes the Lacey Act, the first federal law to protect wildlife. It takes aim at market hunters by prohibiting them from selling poached game across state lines.

1913: Congress passes the Weeks-McLean Migratory Bird Act, which, in another broadside against market hunters, bans the spring shooting of migratory game and insectivorous birds and declares them to be under the “custody and protection” of the federal government. However, two district courts soon rule the act unconstitutional.

1916: The United States signs a treaty with Great Britain (acting on behalf of Canada, then part of the British Empire), in which the two countries agree to stop all hunting of insectivorous birds and to establish specific hunting seasons for game birds. The stated goal is to preserve those species considered beneficial or harmless to man.

1918: To implement the new treaty, Congress passes the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which officially makes it a crime to “pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill,” or “sell” a migratory bird or any of its parts, including nests, eggs, and feathers. The newly passed act eliminates “the necessity of watching the legislation of every state and of combating the numberless attempts to legalize the destruction of birds for private gain,” according to famed ornithologist Frank M. Chapman (also the founder of Audubon magazine).

1920: The U.S. Supreme Court shoots down a challenge to the constitutionality of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, ruling that it does not violate states’ rights.

1936: Following up on its treaty with Great Britain, the United States signs a similar treaty with Mexico (it would go on to sign additional treaties with Japan and the Soviet Union in the 1970s). As a result, more birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and habitat conservation and pollution abatement is encouraged.

1940: Congress passes the Bald Eagle Protection Act, the first federal legislation to ban hunting or otherwise disturbing America’s national emblem (it would later be amended to include Golden Eagles). Modeled after the MBTA, it nonetheless fails to stem the Bald Eagle’s decline at the hands of DDT poisoning.

1970s: For the first time, U.S. prosecutors begin charging not just hunters who violate the MBTA, but also oil and gas, timber, mining, chemical, and electricity companies. Though not directly targeting wildlife, these industries incidentally cause millions of bird deaths each year that could have been avoided with simple infrastructure modifications, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. In publicly available documents, the DOJ states that it will first notify companies of a violation and work with them to correct it. But if they “ignore, deny, or refuse to comply” with best management practices, then the “matter may be referred for prosecution.”

1972: An amendment to the MBTA protects an additional 32 families of birds, including eagles, hawks, owls, and corvids (crows, jays, and magpies). Even more species have been added since, bringing the total number to 1,026—almost every native species in the United States. With such additions, the word “‘migratory” in the act’s title becomes largely symbolic—many birds that do not embark on actual migrations are still protected.

2000: A federal appeals court holds that private citizens (such as conservation groups) may sue the government over alleged violations of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Nonetheless, they remain unable to sue out-of-compliance private companies, which differs in that regard from the Endangered Species Act and many other environmental laws.

2001: Just before leaving office, President Bill Clinton orders all relevant federal agencies, including the Department of Defense and the U.S. Forest Service, to take migratory bird conservation into account as part of their regular decision making.

2002: A federal district court rules that the U.S. Navy violated the MBTA during live-fire exercises in the northern Marianas Islands. Congress responds by exempting the incidental taking of birds during “military readiness activities.”

2013: In a first, the Department of Justice enforces the MBTA against a wind farm operator, imposing $1 million in penalties for the killing of Golden Eagles and other protected birds at two sites in Wyoming. It follows this up a year later with $2.5 million in penalties against a second Wyoming wind farm operator. Actual enforcement of the MBTA against these problems tends to be sporadic.

2015: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces that it will rethink the MBTA’s implemention to hold industries more accountable for the harm they do to birds. Specifically, the changes will address bird deaths due to open oil pits, power lines, gas flares, cell phone towers, and wind turbines—which combined kill millions of birds each year.

2017: The Trump Administration does away with the USFWS’s potential rulemaking updates. Also in 2017, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) introduced an amendment to the SECURE American Energy Act that would change liability under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) to no longer cover incidental takes. This would prevent any enforcement of industrial impacts, end accountability from oil spills, and removed incentives to protect birds, all of which Audubon opposes.

“Rep. Cheney is giving oil and gas companies and other industries a free pass to kill birds with impunity,” said David Yarnold, Audubon’s President and CEO, in an official statement.

Dune sunrise this morning

It is that time again

2017 Cover

Gloucester Rotary Photo Contest,
Photo submission deadline: September 29, 2017 12:00 pm EST

The Gloucester Rotary Club will publish a 12-month Cape Ann photo calendar for 2018 as a fundraiser. All profits will go to the Gloucester Rotary Club’s efforts to raise money that supports the many community and international activities in which the club is involved.

In Order to publish a beautiful calendar, the Club is requesting high quality digital photos that show the unique beauty of Cape Ann throughout the year– landscapes, seascapes, harbor scenes, sunrises/sunsets, boats, wildlife, etc. As we will be featuring one photo per month, we need images from each season: winter, spring, summer and fall. Photographs from Gloucester, Rockport, Essex and Manchester will be accepted.

Full contest rules and requirements are available online at http://www.gloucesterotary.org. All entries must be received by 12:00 p.m. on Friday, September 29, 2017.

More information about the Rotary Club of Gloucester is available online at http://www.gloucesterrotary.org and http://www.facebook.com/RotaryGloucesterMA
Gloucester Rotary Club Announces Photography Contest

What?

A 12-month Cape Ann photo raffle calendar that will be sold through the Gloucester Rotary Club. A raffle ticket will be attached to each calendar and a winning number will be chosen each week in 2018. All profits from the calendar sales will go to the Gloucester Rotary Club’s efforts to raise money that supports the many community and international activities in which the club is involved.

2018 Calendar Theme: Land, Sea and Sky of Cape Ann

Landscapes, seascapes, harbor scenes, sunrises/sunsets, boats, wildlife, etc. Most importantly we want very high quality digital photos that show the beauty of Cape Ann. As we will be featuring one photo per month, we need images from each season: winter, spring, summer and fall. Photographs from Gloucester, Rockport, Essex and Manchester will be accepted. A selection committee from the Rotary Club will make the choices.

Technical specifications & rules:

Horizontal, color, minimum size 12 x 8” digital .jpg files at 300 dpi, maximum size 12 mb. In your entry submission email, title and identify where the photos were shot (e.g., Smith Cove) and, if possible, the month they were created. Photo title must be in your file name (example: kayakers-smith cove-may.jpg). Make sure to give your name and contact info in the email with your entries, including your mailing address, phone number and email address. Because of the large number of entries we expect, entries that do not meet the minimum size requirements and/or photographers who fail to provide the required entry info will be automatically rejected. In addition, no copyright watermarks are to be embedded in the photos or they will be disqualified.

Photographers who submit photos understand that we may need to slightly crop or downsize the winning entries for printing purposes and accept this. We reserve the right to use low res files of winning entries to help advertising the sale of the calendar. Winning entrants will have the photo title or location and photographers name printed under the photo.

How many?

Maximum 3 entries per person

For you

$50 will be paid for each winning entry chosen for the calendar, as well as photo credit.

Where to?

All entries must be emailed to: photocontest@gloucesterrotary.org

Entry Deadline: Friday, September 29, 2017, 12:00 PM

Download flyer here