Here’s The Info With Times For @mrjamiemcdonald @Adventureman Arrival In Gloucester On Wednesday Also Links To His Facebook Page For More Info

HERE IS THE INFO WITH TIMES TO RUN!! JOIN IN AS ADVENTUREMAN FINISHES HIS 5,500 MILE US RUN IN GLOUCESTER- PLEASE SHARE!!!!

Itinerary Wednesday March 27:

*** 6 miles out – don’t worry, it’ll be a nice slow pace!

– Meeting point: Sweeney Park, 113 Summer St, Manchester By the Sea
– Time: 2.30pm 

***1.7 miles out (if you’d like a shorter run)

– Meeting point: Hammond Castle
– Time: 3.45pm

***0.7 miles from the finishing point:

– Meeting point: Stage Fort Park (lots of parking nearby, apparently!)
– Time: 4pm

***Finishing point at the Fisherman’s Memorial Statue – where Jamie will dip his hand in the Atlantic Ocean, having done the same 5,500 miles ago in the Pacific!

-Time: approximately 4.15pm 

After the finish, the nearby Beauport Hotel has confirmed they will be putting on a welcome celebration and reception for supporters, so please do feel free to join us to celebrate the incredible achievement…

For More About Adventureman and his journey check out his Facebook page (I swear your computer or phone will not spontaneously burst into flames if you click the link)

This is a link > https://www.facebook.com/AdventuremanJamieMcDonald/ (links bring you places for more information)

 

 

April 9 Meeting Details

Seaside Garden Club

Easy First Steps to
an Earth-Friendly Garden with Rebecca Warner

Rebecca Warner offers simple methods for making compost and
improving soil, by using easy ways to make mulch from free materials you find
close to home. Rebecca reveals a time-saving, earth-friendly way to prepare
beds for annuals and vegetables in the spring. She will give us a quick recipe
for making peat-free potting mix for use in your containers.

Rebecca Warner is a home gardener in Newton, Massachusetts with thirty
years’ experience working toward a sustainable garden. Her book, “The
Sustainable-Enough Garden,” is the story of her quest to make a beautiful
garden that’s environmentally friendly. Toward that end she has overhauled her
garden practices, from composting to mulching, lawn care to irrigation. She
blogs weekly at http://thesustainable-enoughgarden.blogspot.com/.

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APPLY TODAY FOR GLOUCESTER BIOTECHNOLOGY ACADEMY!

Cape Ann Community

The deadline for priority admission has passed, but applications are still being accepted for the upcoming Gloucester Biotechnology Academy class of 2020!

Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity to learn hands-on science at the bench, and get your career started in biotech!

Visit gmgi.org/apply to learn more and download the applications.

Reach out to John Doyle, Education Director with any questions at john.doyle@gmgi.org

GBA logo

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Adventureman and His Peeps are as Fun as they are Awesome

I had the absolute pleasure of meeting Adventureman and his team at Sweeney Park in Manchester-by-the-Sea at 6:00 tonight (Monday) to absolutely zero pomp and circumstance. It felt a little weird to meet them with no real grandeur, but…as we all know…that is because we are saving the giant welcome for WEDNESDAY at 4:00 pm.  Tonight was about a quiet finish….as they prepare for a day of rest and most likely LOTS of reflection. It will be nice for the group to take some time together before sharing their tremendous finish with the city of Gloucester, the far reaching social media universe, fans around the world….and, of course, their beloved Gloucester, England.

They landed at Sweeney Park clearly spent, but in super good spirits….hugged, danced and sang a bit (there may have been a harmonica…it’s kind of a blur)….and then went about the business of tending to Caesar and their gear.  Speaking of Caesar….he (it?) was safely tucked away at a neighbor’s house (THANK YOU if you are reading…you know who you are) and then we tended to the task at hand…Dinner….and maybe some drinks. Thanks to Callas for a great night!

Dinner out with this crew was exactly how you might expect it to be.  Hysterical….crazy fun….and like Thanksgiving dinner with dear old friends.  Joey, Pat D. and I were so happy to sit down and break bread with Adventureman, his phenomenal dad, the unbelievable support team, and a new friend who ran the last 30 miles with them.  You couldn’t ask for a kinder, funnier, and more gracious group of people….and we can’t wait for you to meet them all on Wednesday.

Thanks to the amazing generosity of some good people who will be named later, the team is getting some great rest and are further planning their monumental finish.  PLEASE be sure to be there to celebrate them and this epic adventure.  And, if you’re able, consider making a donation to help the sick children that Jamie (Adventureman) cares so deeply about.  DONATE HERE 

Some of my favorite video of the evening is Joey schooling the group about the Greasy Pole….after they had schooled us on the sport of cheese rolling and a quick rendition of “Michael Row Your Boat Ashore” after Joey suggested that they might be interested in taking a dory out for a row tomorrow (after running 210 marathons). Gloucester, England and Gloucester, Ma have a lot to learn from each other….such as some vocabulary differences (but that’s a post for a different day).

Welcome to Cape Ann, Adventureman!  We are SO HAPPY that you are here!

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@adventureman @mrjamiemcdonald arrived in Manchester! Please read, the schedule that is stickied to the top of GMG is accurate for his finish in Gloucester Wednesday .

http://www.goodmorninggloucester.com

Click the link. I promise it will take you to the Adventureman times of arrival and finish on WEDNESDAY.

We met at Calas tonight!

$450,000 call for Public Art | East Boston Police Station

RFP East Boston police station march 25, 2019.jpgBid is open-
Eligibility – This Call to Artists is open to all artists, artisans, architects, landscape architects, or teams with experience in public art, site responsive design, project management, and construction administration.

Deadline April 25, 2019

Introduction
The City of Boston, as part of its Percent for Art program, invites artists or artist teams to apply to create permanent public artwork to complement the new East Boston Police Station.

Call released: March 25, 2019, 12:00 PM EDT
Deadline for responses: April 25, 2019, 11:59 PM EDT
Budget: $450,000

Click here to read the full RFP. To print, please download first.

Click here to read the Press Release

Sawyer Free Library new building presentation March 27

Sawyer Free Library Gloucester Massachusetts_20190306_© catherine ryan

Keep What Works at the Library – Keep What Works at the Library”, Martha Bowen letter to the editor, Gloucester Daily Times, March 23, 2019

Keep What Works at the Library LTE by Martha Bowen Gloucester Daily Times_March 23 2019.jpg

UPCOMING MEETINGS THIS WEEK

  • ON Tuesday       March 26, 2019 Library Trustees meeting from 5:30-7:30PM
  • ON Wednesday March 27, 2019 there is a Library (new) Building Committee meeting from 4pm – 6pm. The monthly meetings sometimes follow the traditional schedule of meeting on the last Wednesday of each month at 4:00 pm, and sometimes they have been/will be combined with Trustee meetings, etc. Do confirm ahead: 01/30/2019, 02/27/2019 02/26/2019, 03/27/2019, 04/24/2019 LOCATION: confirm SFL location if Friend Room or one of two rooms upstairs/downstairs in Saunders. There may be other informal ad hoc meetings.

Since the last meeting February 26, 2019

 

City Hall from Sawyer Free Gloucester MA_20190306_© catherine ryan

library event page March 25 2019
website 3/25/19

Continue reading “Sawyer Free Library new building presentation March 27”

BREAKING NEWS: OUR PIPING PLOVERS HAVE ARRIVED AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH!!!!!!

Our beautiful Piping Plovers have returned! This afternoon we observed them foraging at the shoreline, then chased up to the wrack line by a bounding off-leash dog. After the dog departed the area, the two PiPls dozed off in the drifts of sand and dry beach grass.

The pair look plump and vigorous, not nearly as weary looking as the PiPls that arrived last year on April 3rd, after the four March nor’easters.

Unbelievably, the male is already displaying courtship behavior! And even more amazingly so, he was doing it within mere feet of where they have nested for the past three years.

I know I sound like a broken record, but today was an on-leash day. There were at least a half a dozen dogs off-leash in the forty-five minutes Charlotte, Tom, and I were there. I purposefully bring Charlotte to the beach on on-leash days because of the out of control dogs. A forty to fifty pound off-leash Golden Retriever puppy came bounding up to Charlotte, while its owner stood back shouting he’ll slobber all over her. I was more concerned with the oversized pup knocking her over and used considerable force to hold the puppy back, while Tom scooped up Charlotte. Everyone I spoke with was not aware of the dog laws, old laws and the new laws, and the new 300.00 fines. All the ordinances on the books are not going to do a thing, unless they are enforced.

 

ADVENTUREMAN IS ON SCHEDULE TO ARRIVE ON WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON!

Please help give Jamie a true Gloucester welcome! Jamie hails from Gloucester, England and it is an honor that he chose Gloucester, Massachusetts as his final destination on his 5,500 mile cross country journey.

See Joey’s up-to-the minute schedule of when Adventureman will be arriving to Gloucester, posted at the top of the blog, and for Facebook readers, at goodmorninggloucester.org.

Serendipity’s Playhouse 88 Bass Avenue #GloucesterMA | Grand Opening Friday March 29, 2019 4:30PM

Serendipity's Playhouse_Gloucester Massachusetts_20190325_grand opening March © catherine ryan (15)

John and Phyllis Linquata announce their new business, Serendipity’s Playhouse, Cape Ann’s first indoor play space! Join them at 4:30PM on Friday, March 29, 2019 for the Grand Opening!

Serendipty’s Playhouse
88 Bass Avenue
Gloucester, Massachusetts
(978) 283-4335

After a year of renovations & permits and the challenges & kismet of converting a former tile store into a family- friendly destination, Serendipity Playhouse is open! The entryway tile design became a plus, matching the new vision at the site. This welcome playland features amusing attractions, an expansive wooden climbing structure, pint-sized imaginative activity stations, foam pit, ride on train, airplane see-saw, and a separate padded toddler space. Families can sign up for extra programs like Zoomba’s “Zoombini” package on Saturdays at 9AM.

The Linquatas sussed out an ideal location with plenty of parking and neighboring businesses that are a natural fit. Families and caregivers can refuel, meet up and juggle errands with a play break: Cape Ann Coffees is right next door; Charlie’s Place is across the street; Stop & Shop plaza is out back; and Good Harbor Beach is a walk away.  The Linquatas are Gloucester residents and parents which is evident because 1)see their location intel and 2) the convenient hours…they open early enough for those families with wee early risers. The new venture is very much a family endeavor. John is running the day to day operations. Phyllis dreamed of opening an indoor wonderland and brings her professional expertise as a preschool teacher into building the business. Their daughter is helping out after school. They are determined to provide an active indoor play haven that’s super clean and engaging.

Serendipity's Playhouse_Gloucester Massachusetts_20190325_grand opening March © catherine ryan (14)
special offers for grandparents, police, fire, military and twins!

Howard’s Flying Dragon in Essex

We like to go antiquing and one sure sign of spring is when the shops start expanding their hours. Howard’s Flying Dragon in Essex May not be familiar by name, but it’s location is well known for the window messages it shares with the world. I check the window every time we drive by.

You can see their message this past weekend was Then and Now. It drew me in! And look who greeted us; Beatrice-showing every bit of disdain any self respecting cat does quite naturally.

As you can see, the place is jammed full of stuff old, new and delightful.

It’s one of our favorites and I look forward to returning. I was told their winter hours will end this month,so….yahoo!

FACTS ABOUT FOX KILLING AT DUXBURY BEACH AND DEBUNKING PIPING PLOVER MYTH #6

Let’s talk about the petition circulating in Duxbury to prevent wildlife officials from taking foxes and coyotes that are eating Piping Plover eggs. Many friends have sent links to the story and I apologize for taking over a week to respond.

Local persons are re-posting the story on their social media platforms unintentionally, and in the case of one, intentionally, inciting outrage at the Piping Plovers. This story has become sensationalized and taken out of context. I experienced a similar situation, that of a story about Piping Plovers being misrepresented, when last summer a Boston news channel interviewed me at Good Harbor Beach about our PiPls nesting in the parking lot. Instead of a feature about what a great job our DPW, Mayor’s administration, and community were doing in helping protect the nesting Piping Plovers that had been driven into the parking lot by dogs, it was edited as a story about GHB loosing income from lost parking spaces. In reality, our PiPl family had returned to the beach by the time all the parking spaces were needed.

Readers should know that fox and coyote hunting is permitted in Massachusetts. The 2019 hunting season dates are January 1st through February 28th, resuming November 1st and continuing through February 29th, 2020. Read More Here. Hunting is part of our culture. To be very clear, I love all animals, I LOVE foxes, and especially Red Fox. When one made a midnight visit to our backyard several weeks ago and snooped around the base of our Blue Princess holly, my husband and I were beyond excited about the prospect of them possibly denning in our garden.

Red Fox Coffins Beach

All that being said, it is sadly understandable why a number of beaches along the Northeastern Seaboard, beside Duxbury beach (including Crane Beach, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, other Massachusetts beaches, Rhode Island beaches, and New Jersey beaches) have had to resort to predator management programs. This is the course of last resort. Please bear in mind that Eastern Coyotes, Herring Gulls, Great Black-backed Gulls, Crows, and Red Foxes are not endangered, rare, or even threatened species, as are many of the region’s nesting shorebirds.

I have seen first hand at Coffins Beach a Red Fox mom and her kit digging in the sand and coming very close to where there was a Piping Plover nest. Last year, the only nest that was at Coffins Beach was believed by Greenbelt to have been predated by fox. In 2018, at Winthrop Beach, dogs off leash, and a skunk, caused the entire colony of 150 pairs of endangered Least Terns to abandon the established nesting area and move elsewhere. The year before that, again at Winthrop Beach, a Peregrine Falcon had killed numerous chicks, both Least Tern and Piping Plover.

 

Least Tern eggs are exposed in the sand, just as are the eggs of Piping Plovers, and many other species of shorebirds.

At Crane Beach, electric fencing is used during the night to keep fox and coyote away from the PiPl and Least Tern nests. The wire exclosures that we use at Good Harbor Beach to protect the nests will only be used for as long as avian predators do not realize they can perch on the edge of the wire and eat the adults as they move in and out of the exclosure to brood the eggs.

Peregrine Falcon eating a bird and a gull waiting to snatch a few morsels. 

In the case of the Peregrine Falcon, it was relocated to the western part of the state. However, relocating mammals is not a legal option in Massachusetts. Electric fencing is not possible at all beaches. Wire exclosures are no longer used at Crane Beach because Great Horned Owls learned they could prey upon the adult Piping Plovers as they were entering and exiting the exclosure.

Killing wildlife to protect other species of wildlife is a very sensitive topic and again, is the action of last resort taken.

People often say, why not let nature takes its course. But there is really very little that is natural about beaches that were once shorebird habitat that have now become public. The reason why we have predation by Red and Gray Fox, Eastern Coyotes, Skunks, Crows, and a variety of gull species at public beaches is because they are attracted to the garbage left behind by people and there is nothing natural about that!

I urge everyone to read the following to gain a better understanding of why some beaches have had to to turn to predator management programs:

Duxbury Beach and Predator Management

Recently questions have come up regarding the predator management program on Duxbury Beach.  This is a controversial and oftentimes upsetting topic but is one of the challenges that the Duxbury Beach Reservation faces when trying to balance the many uses of the beach.

As landowners and stewards of Duxbury Beach for over 100 years, the Reservation strives to maintain a balance between protecting the natural resources of the beach, including habitat for wildlife, preserving the barrier which shelters the communities behind it, and providing use of the beach for recreational purposes including over-sand vehicles.   In order to provide use of the beach for recreation, habitat and species conservation regulations must be adhered to including predator management mandates by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Many residents of the South Shore have visited Duxbury Beach since childhood and have likely seen big changes to the beach – both through dune and infrastructure projects and in how the beach must be managed under local, state, and federal law.

Duxbury Beach is unique is many ways, including the nesting habitat it affords to rare and protected shorebirds.  Unfortunately, Piping Plover conservation, which is regulated under the state and federal Endangered Species Acts, can come in to conflict with human interests, including development and recreation.  In order to provide greater options for beach managers working to adhere to state and federal guidelines for plover protection while providing recreational opportunities, the state of Massachusetts has a Habitat Conservation Plan under the US Fish and Wildlife Service.  The Plan allows certain “risky” activities while providing mitigation to ensure the plover population is better protected overall.  The Duxbury Beach Reservation received a sub-permit under this statewide plan to allow recreational driving on the back road and front beach in closer proximity to young plover chicks.

Under this permit allowing recreational driving, the Duxbury Beach Reservation is responsible for continuing an intensive monitoring program and providing mitigation.  As stated by Mass Wildlife, the only form of mitigation acceptable under the US Fish and Wildlife permit is lethal predator control, because it has the highest likelihood of offsetting the potential loss.

Predator management is not the Reservation’s first option and is carefully considered each year and on a case by case basis.  The predator management program has been in place on Duxbury Beach for 8 years.  For comparison, predator management has occurred on beaches in the state of Massachusetts for over 13 years.  The plan on Duxbury Beach has undergone continuance debate and study throughout its tenure, with examination by multiple agencies and several opportunities for public comment.

The Duxbury Beach predator management program design was and continues to be based on extensive data collected on the beach on predator presence and egg and chick loss to ensure the program targets those species that are responsible for heavy losses.  Fox have been removed 3 of the past 8 years that a predator management program has been in place, and every year the number removed has been far, far fewer than the numbers suggested on social media.  This targeted removal during a limited time of year has been successful in providing two rare and protected species, the Piping Plover and Least Tern, a window of opportunity to nest and raise young on some of the little remaining nesting habitat on the east coast.  It has also afforded thousands of visitors the chance to come and enjoy the beach.

Instituting a predator management program is controversial, challenging, often upsetting, and may even seem counter-intuitive to many.  Why remove one species so that another may succeed?  Aren’t there other options?

While it may seem simple to “let nature take its course” we do not operate in an entirely “natural” system.  With the removal of large predators, such as wolves, from this area by the mid-20th century, mid-sized predators, including fox, coyote, and raccoons, were able to extend their ranges and increase in population in these areas.  There are communities of hundreds of homes flanking Duxbury Beach that provide ample habitat for species like red fox that can do very well in suburban and even urban areas while other species, like the plovers and terns, have had habitat regularly destroyed by development.

Today, the largest cause of plover and tern egg and chick loss on Duxbury Beach, and many other beaches statewide, is predation by species whose populations are not in jeopardy.  Unfortunately, the common predators on Duxbury Beach, including the larger mammals (fox and coyote) and avian predators (crow and gull) are more likely to be attracted to the beach due to trash. There are staff on Duxbury Beach in the summer to pick up trash on the beach, road, and parking lots in the hopes of making the beach less attractive to animals like fox.  With communities at the far end of the beach it is impossible to limit the attractiveness of Duxbury Beach to predators with large ranges. There are very few suitable denning spots on the beach and most of the large mammals come to the beach from mainland Duxbury and Marshfield where they find ample denning spots under houses, sheds, etc.

Unfortunately, relocation of individual predators is not an option for multiple reasons:

  • It is illegal under Massachusetts law to capture and relocate wildlife off your property
  • Conflict, stress, or death caused due to intrusion into an existing individual’s territory
  • Harm to the individuals removed from their territory and a struggle to find food and shelter. Humans do not always recognize appropriate habitats for wildlife and put them in bad locations.
  • Spread of disease
  • Disruption of ecological processes by introducing a new species or more individuals to an area
  • The problem is not solved, but moved to a new location

Many have questioned why Duxbury Beach does not use “wire cages” around plover nests as are sometimes seen on other beaches.  These cages are predator exclosures and are oftentimes an unsuccessful and harmful tool. Unfortunately, predators (including fox, raptors, crow, and others) can target exclosures and kill adults when they switch off the nest. This is more detrimental to plover conservation than losing eggs or chicks because of the loss of future reproductive potential of the breeding adult. Predator exclosure use is highly dependent on beach, nesting site, and predator suite.   On Duxbury Beach it is not typically feasible to use exclosures, however, it is carefully considered. In addition, exclosures do not work for Least Tern nests as they are colonial nesters and fly to and from the nest.

In some cases, electric fencing can be used around plover and/or tern nesting areas. While this is only helpful in detracting large, mammalian predators, it does work on some beaches. Unfortunately, given the span, configuration, and location (dynamic beach), electric fencing is not feasible on Duxbury Beach.

This is not an easy topic and one that is discussed and voted on annually by the Reservation’s board. The Reservation will continue to collect and analyze data and assess all possible options for conservation and site management in order to protect the natural resources of the beach and maintain the protective barrier, while providing access for recreation where possible.  The Reservation will also continue to work with state and federal regulators to find the best options for protection on Duxbury Beach in order to adhere to the laws we must operate under.  We appreciate everyone who has taken the time to learn more about the work and understand that we are doing our upmost to strike a balance between the many uses of Duxbury Beach.

If you are interested in learning more about statewide shorebird conservation efforts or predator management work, we recommend reaching out to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Today! closing party Rocky Neck Now 2019 group show

Sense of place and artists- Installation views before the closing party March 24, 2019 Rocky Neck Now 2019 Looking All Around at Rocky Neck Cultural Center 

 

Pat Lowery Collins art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (29).jpg

Loren Doucette art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (30).jpg

Marci Davis art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (25).jpg

Andy Marlow art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (17).jpg