Thursday at the Essex Shipbuilding with O’Maley’s 8th graders

Being over there for the second day, I am learning as well about how to build a boat.  These kids really pay attention and enjoy seeing what is built with their own hands.  The rope Grommet was interesting to watch being made, the kids under the boats drilling and the sanding of the oars was educational as well as fun.  The Essex Shipbuilding Museum staff, the O’Maley teachers and the kids made for a wonderful couple of days.  Thank you for the invite.

O’Maley 8th graders at the Essex Shipbuilding building 2 boats

This is my 3rd year being invited to take photos over at the Essex Shipbuilding in Essex, as the O’Maley’s 8th graders make 2 boats on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The teachers, Amy Donnelly and David Brown are terrific and the kids really learn from them.  The staff at the Essex Shipbuilding Museum help out so much teaching the kids how to build a boat.  Love these 8th graders and their enthusiasm making something with their own hands.  The photos below are from Wednesday.

The Gannet coming out after a long winter, photos from our friend Mary Barker

You can tell it’s spring when the gig rowers and volunteers have flocked to Maritime Gloucester to get their boats back in the water.

From our friend Mary Barker.  She was down at Maritime Gloucester yesterday morning as the Gannet was being lowered into the water.

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Phyllis A. Marine Associations celebrates the 1950’s

Gruppe Painting Raffle will Benefit the Restoration of the Phyllis A

The Phyllis A Marine A Association is excited to announce that, through a partnership with the State of the Art Gallery, a very significant Emile Gruppe painting has become available and will be raffled as a benefit fundraiser.
The restoration of this 1925 fishing vessel, built for Albert Arnold, is the oldest former fishing vessel in Gloucester harbor. Arnold’s family migrated from Michigan in 1910 along with other families including the Tysvers, Dahlmers, Shoares and others whom were referred to as the “Michigan Bears” and they used a special method of fishing called gillnetting working out of East Gloucester.
“Shoares Wharf” was located on East Main Street and is now part of a private residence. This painting was completed in the early 1930’s and shows another gillnetter tied to the dock along with a smaller fishing vessel. Measuring 20″x24″, this painting has been recently restored and framed.
Never seen by the public, this painting has had ownership by Emile Gruppe, Walker Fielding and Joseph W Moore with an appraisal value of $14,000.
Only two hundred tickets will be sold, at $200 each, to raise $40,000. Monies raised beyond the appraisal value will go directly to the Phyllis A to support the restoration of this historical vessel.
Purchase tickets at the State-of-the-Art Gallery – 4 Wonson Street on Rocky Neck. Contact Roger @ 978/395-1783 or Phyllis A Marine Association @978/283-9292. Or click the button below.
The painting will be available for viewing at the Phyllis A Marine Association’s annual party on April 6th, at the Gloucester Fraternity Club, Webster Street. (Link to tickets also below.)
A Preview Party and Raffle Drawing will be held on June 6th at the Gloucester House Restaurant.
Otherwise to view the painting, please contact Roger Armstrong for special viewing.Everyone at the Phyllis A would like to thank Roger Armstrong and his Gallery, and Lenny Linquata and the Gloucester House for this exciting and wonderful opportunity.


Purchase tickets online

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Our mailing address is:
Phyllis A. Marine Association
81 Rocky Neck Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930

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LITTLE RIVER VOLUNTEER FISH COUNTERS NEEDED!

Lily Pond, snowy day West Gloucester

Little River Volunteer Fish Counters Needed!

The Lily Pond and the Little River host a small, but resilient population of river herring. These fish, alewives and blueback herring, migrate from the ocean to the Lily Pond, spawn and then return to the sea. The young fish head downstream in late summer. This is one of the few “runs” remaining on the North Shore, and also one of the oldest in the commonwealth. We would like to know more about when and how many fish travel upstream every year. You can help us by volunteering to count fish as they migrate upstream to the Lily Pond from the Little River.

River herring provide important forage for cod fish, bluefish, tuna and striped bass….all important commercial, recreational and sport fish for the City of Gloucester. Each spring the City of Gloucester hosts a river herring count at the top of the fish ladder by the West Gloucester Water Filtration Plant. Volunteers monitor the once a year spawning run from the Atlantic Ocean This is a wonderful activity for families, scouts, home schoolers, youth and adult groups….. suitable for all ages!

Volunteering is simple and requires as little as ten minutes of your time.

The count runs from April 1st to May 30th .

There will be an informational training session held on Monday, March 25, 2019 at 6 PM in the first floor conference room at 19 Harbor Loop, Gloucester, and a field training session on Saturday March 30 at 10 AM at the West Gloucester Water Filtration Plant at 372 Magnolia Ave, Gloucester.

If you would like to count fish in Gloucester, contact:

Peter Seminara, Gloucester Shellfish Constable and Alewife Warden at the Shellfish Department at (978) 325-5248, by cell phone or text at (978) 949-1223, or by email at pseminara@gloucester-ma.gov.