Gloucester Sea Serpent Sighting | Cape Ann Museum unveils new public art

CHRIS WILLIAMS_Sea Serpent bronze glass granite Cape Ann Musuem commissioned sculpture tribute to Ronda Faloon_unveiled July 20 2019_Gloucester MASS_©c ryan (2).jpg
photo caption: Chris Williams, Gloucester Sea Serpent, 2019, 9 feet tall mixed media metal sculpture (bronze, glass, granite), collection Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, Mass., a 2018 commisioned gift of CAM and donors in honor of Ronda Faloon, Cape Ann Museum Director (2006-2019). Chris Williams resides and works in Essex, Mass. © c ryan

Gloucester Sea Serpent

The Gloucester Sea Serpent is like a Massachusetts Loch Ness monster though an ocean rather than freshwater creature. Alleged sightings date back to 1638; see excellent research by Lise Breen for the HarborWalk marker #19 “The Sea Serpent”.

In 2017, the Cape Ann Museum (CAM) celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Sea Serpent’s peak folklore moment when hundreds of accounts were published in newspapers. (In comparison, the first written record of a monster in Loch Ness dates way back to 565, picks up popular speed by 1802, and on to global recognition by 1933). Swampscott and North Shore sightings surged as competition with Newport and other summer tourism hotspots increased.  Sea serpent inspired art across media continued into the 20th and 21st centuries.

Sea Serpent exhibition banner_Cape Ann Museum Gloucester MA_20171028_©c ryan
photo caption: Cape Ann Museum – street banners heralding Sea Serpent Exhibition 2017

 

Below: A Sea Serpent at Cressy Beach Stage Fort Park in Gloucester was originally painted by fine artist Robert Stephenson circa 1960 and is kept fresh by adoring community. Many moons ago, a free standing climber serpent was a favorite element at the Stage Fort Park playground. My photos in this post span years/seasons, roughly 2011-2019. Hover for descriptive details or double click & enlarge.

 

July 20, 2019

The new sculpture commission, Gloucester Sea Serpent, by Chris Williams at Cape Ann Museum was dedicated July 20, 2019,  to honor Ronda Faloon, distinguished Cape Ann Museum Director (2006-2019) who retired in 2019.

CHRIS WILLIAMS_Sea Serpent bronze glass granite Cape Ann Musuem commissioned sculpture tribute to Ronda Faloon_unveiled July 20 2019_Gloucester MASS_©c ryan (7)

 

Before

Look for the serpent’s nocturne visage: the Williams sculpture is the first one on museum grounds to incorporate light amidst its mixed media.

The Gloucester Sea Serpent at the entrance joins other sculptures on view in the Cape Ann Museum Courtyard and Sculpture Garden, a special public space dedicated to the memory of Harold Bell, President of Cape Ann Museum (1979-2003).

ALBERT HENRY ATKINS (1880-1951) Spirt of the Sea 1915 bronze [fun fact courtesy Alex Monell: architect (Cape Ann Museum & CAM board) Don Monell held this sculpture on his property until the best re-siting]

ALBERT HENRY ATKINS_ 1880 to 1951 _Spirit of the Sea_1915 bronze_Arion_Cape Ann Museum_Gloucester MASS_sculpture courtyard _20180830_©c ryan.jpg

 

ROBERT AMORY, Reflection, 1970 gift of the artist

ROBERT AMORY sculpture_Cape Ann Museum courtyard sculpture garden_20171028_© cryanLooking back to city hall through ROBERT AMORY sculpture Cape Ann Museum courtyard_Gloucester MA _20180830_©c ryan

 

KEN HRUBY Uneasy Crown, Uneasy Chair, Uneasy Piece, 1986 (cast 2008) Gift of Judith McCulloch in memory of Harold Bell

KEN HRUBY Uneasy Crown Uneasy Chair Uneasy Piece 1986 cast 2008 _Cape Ann Museum courtyard sculpture garden_20171028_© cryan

 

And dappled today, GEORGE DEMETRIOS bronze fountain, Spring

dappled GEORGE DEMETRIOS Spring bronze fountain_Cape Ann Museum_sculpture courtyard_Gloucester MASS_©c ryan _20190721.jpg

Across the street, the Cape Ann Museum sculpture park and gardens designed by Clara Batchelor, CBA Landscape Architect Principal, opened in 2011. Its centerpiece features

JOHN RAIMONDI sculpture, Dance of the Cranes

Boston Globe seashore jaunt all #GloucesterMA | Beauport Museum, Halibut Point restaurant, Virgilio’s, Bananas

Gloucester in the news again this weekend about  a great road trip. See today’s Sunday paper- Boston Globe By Linda Greenstein

Read full article  here

to see more mentions from their itinerary.

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50 years ago today…the art of the first moon landing and Gloucester Daily Times front page

Today is the anniversary of the first moon landing on July 20, 1969. When I think about this momentous day, I mostly remember the artist Robert Rauschenberg, one of the established artists paid a tiny honorarium to travel to see space launches first hand. NASA gave artists total freedom to create any visual response if so awed. They were. Decades later, Rauschenberg agreed to loan rare works of art inspired by the space program for a solo exhibit that I co-curated. It was a big surprise when he scheduled a visit. He spent a morning at the show with me, closely observing each and every piece, some he hadn’t seen since he made them.  Many were created long after his residency. He was flooded; it’s very emotional.

Where were you on this day? I was in Plymouth, MA.

As i’m in a wishing and reflective mode, may I add that I look forward to the day when all Massachusetts newspapers are scanned and searchable. In the meantime, the Gloucester Daily Times coverage of that inspiring moon walk is on microfilm at the Gloucester Lyceum & Sawyer Free Library. Enjoy the headlines and some local quotes from 1969.

“Older folks take moon in stride–They’ve seen a lot, but this one…” by Henry Meyer, Gloucester Daily Times

article excerpts including quotes from Arthur Jones, Mrs. Bertha Silva, and John Bordreau (91)

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This moon shot business: Can you dig it?  Arthur W. Jones, 67, who lives at the Huntress Public Medical Institution can. Jones and some of his fellow residents on Emerson Avenue have seen the entire panorama of the development of aircraft… “This is one of the greatest things that has happened to our country.” The moon shot had helped to “unite people together,” he said…“When this country gets together, they do things right. No matter what they start, they finish it.”

Mrs. Bertha Silva said that Lindbergh’s flight was exciting back then. However she agreed with Jones that the landing of the first man on the moon really outdid all other flying feats…

John Bordreau, 91, also a resident of the institution was delighted by the whole affair. Boudreau predicted that astronauts soon will be flying all over the solar system…”We’ll just have to wait and see where they’re headed.” Both Jones and Boudreau said they had heard there was oil and gas on the moon. Boudreau remarked, “That’s kind of a long drive for just a couple of gallons of gas. Jones predicted that within 10 years men will be living on the moon. Some scientists said over the radio that there were eaves on the moon where people might live. He said there was oil up there and that they might be able to extract water from rocks.”…One person said that at her age she tended to be leery of these things…Others expressed confusion at the speed at which this generation seems to be moving…

excerpts from Our men on the moon: ‘A long day’…a hazardous return, by Edward K. Delong, Space Center, Houston, UPI article ran in the Gloucester Daily Times.

Mrs. Stephen Armstrong, Neil’s mother who watched her son on television from her home in Wapakoneta, Ohio, noticed this: “I could tell he was pleased and tickled and thrilled,” she said.

“Magnificent desolation,” commented Aldrin. “It has a stark beauty all of its own. It’s much like the desert of the United States.”

“It’s different, but it’s very pretty out here,” said Armstrong, who lived in California’s Mojave Desert when he was flying the X15 rocket plane. Armstrong and Aldrin, both about 5’11” cast 35 foot shadows…Zint said he was surprised by the emotion in Armstrong’s voice when he stepped onto the moon. “That was more emotion than I’ve ever heard him express before. Even when he talked about things he was excited about like space travel he always had a calm voice.”

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Cape Ann Museum July 25 |special lecture and new biography about American artist Nell Blaine by author Cathy Curtis!

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Alive Still: Nell Blaine, American Painter | A Talk with Author Cathy Curtis

The Cape Ann Museum, is pleased to present an illustrated talk by author Cathy Curtis about beloved Cape Ann artist Nell Blaine on Thursday, July 25 at 7:00 p.m. This program is free for Museum members or $10 nonmembers. Reservations are required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10.

Alive Still: Nell Blaine, America Painter (Oxford University Press, 2019) is the biography of an artist who believed she was at the top of her game in 1959, when she traveled to Greece to paint. She had a great time . . . until she contracted the most severe form of polio and had to be airlifted to New York. A paraplegic at age thirty-seven, she was determined to regain her skills. Her coloristically brilliant, rhythmically vibrant style illuminated landscapes and still lifes that reflect her passion for the natural world. During the next three decades she would become a notable painter and one of America’s great watercolorists. In 1974, she purchased a cottage on Ledge Road, where she and her partner, painter Carolyn Harris, made the most of the splendid views available on Cape Ann.

Cathy Curtis is the author of two previous biographies of women artists, RESTLESS AMBITION: GRACE HARTIGAN, PAINTER (Oxford University Press, 2015) and A GENEROUS VISION: THE CREATIVE LIFE OF ELAINE DE KOONING (Oxford University Press, 2017). She earned a master’s degree in the history of art from the University of California, Berkeley, and wrote art criticism for many years. In 2018, she was elected to a two-year term as president of Biographers International Organization in 2018. Her website is www.cathycurtis.net

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Cathy Curtis

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum July 25 |special lecture and new biography about American artist Nell Blaine by author Cathy Curtis!”

Cape Ann Museum July 27 | Who Was Ben Butler? special program with Gloucester Stage

16. Alfred James Wiggin (1823-1883), General Benjamin F. Butler (1818-1893).jpgUpcoming special event at Cape Ann Museum

Who Was Ben Butler? A series of presentations at the Cape Ann Museum

The Cape Ann Museum and Gloucester Stage Company are pleased to present Who Was Ben Butler? a special arrangement of speakers and performers on Saturday, July 27 at 2:00 p.m. This program will take place at 27 Pleasant Street, Gloucester and is free for Gloucester Stage Company & Museum members or $10 nonmembers(includes Museum admission). Reservations are required. For more information visit capeannmuseum.org or call 978-283-0455 x10.

Benjamin Franklin Butler of Gloucester had many admirers and detractors as he helped shape the course of mid-19th century America.  He won a seat in Congress while camping in Bay View, started the Cape Ann Granite Company, owned the yacht “America,” championed women’s suffrage, and changed the course of the Civil War, not through military skill but legal acumen.  These accomplishments are among many achieved in a life spent in business, law, and the military.

In 21st century Gloucester, however, Butler remains a cypher.

The Gloucester Stage Company and the Cape Ann Museum are pleased to re-introduce Ben Butler to his adopted city.

Gloucester Stage will present the play BEN BUTLER August 2-25, and in anticipation of that, the Cape Ann Museum and Gloucester Stage will offer an opportunity to acquaint themselves with one of Gloucester’s most accomplished citizens.  Professor Robert Forrant (U. Mass Lowell), a noted Butler historian, will join some of Butler’s Bay View descendants for a lively discussion, and actors from the play BEN BUTLER will make an appearance to give a hint at this fascinating and witty play.

Image credit: Alfred James Wiggin, Benjamin F. Butler. Collection of the Cape Ann Museum.

About the Cape Ann Museum Continue reading “Cape Ann Museum July 27 | Who Was Ben Butler? special program with Gloucester Stage”

Dore & Whittier School consolidation plans & costs heading to MSBA August 1, 2019

 

On July 18, 2019 the architectural firm, Dore & Whittier, was slated to reveal associated rough costs on new school(s) buildings– such as construction costs, swing space costs, and eligible reimbursables– with the School Building Committee. (See summary of City Council requests July 9, 2019 here.) The meetings are public. Associated costs were not transparent for the public. Instead a dollar sign rating system was illlustrated pictorially, like so:

Slide 9 comparative costs 14 options_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (11)

Why were rough estimate details cut from the presentation? A few reasons were provided, namely “MSBA does not look kindly” on public disclosure because

  • The MSBA aims to have the best possible build based on educatioal needs and goals rather than cost. Publishing amounts can taint the bidding or decision making.
  • The public may be too attached to numbers they hear and/or be confused because of the (lengthy) timeline. By the time shovels hit the dirt the final bids will be different.

Other districts post all associated costs, why not Gloucester? Why are the design/build firms awarded these contracts charged with bidding out the cost evaluations on projects, especially ones greater than 5 million?  Why assume this process is the only way to go about it?

Michele Rogers with Dore & Whittier announced that there were “no surprises” following review of the cost estimate comparisons. “Eliminations were easy; the most expensive were eliminated.” She concluded that this presentation was the second and final per their contract for services related to this Feasibility Study Phase. [This one feasibility study phase contract total cost is: $569,075  ($284,296 for the feasibility study and $275,704 for the future schematic design. One environmental study add on is $9075). Requests for a breakdown of all studies and plans related to new schools–at least since 2012– have gone unanswered by the school committee and architectural firm.]

The next step is to compile and deliver submission to the MSBA, the state agency tasked with reviewing Gloucester’s application for new schools.

Q. Next steps? “Submittal allows us to do geotechnical site evaluation and other necessary investigations (like traffic and environmental studies), and more design. Submittal helps us narrow down and leave behind areas we won’t bother with as we know…We’ll need to tighten the building design and handle specialized pieces. We’ll proceed from 9 options to 6 very quickly. ”

Q. What is the submission? “It’s a thick binder, maybe 10- inches thick, with all our reports to date, the educational program narrative, the space summaries approved earlier, etc.” Will the MSBA require a presentation? “No. The MSBA will review the binders within a two week turn around; then we have a two week turn around to respond.” Dunn commented to make sure the City see that. The MSBA will decide on November 13th or November 20th whether to make a recommendation to allow this proposal to proceed to the next phase: schematic  design. “Or they’ll push back and request more information.” The MSBA “will not require more work on many options as the scoring was so low. They’ll be concentrating on the top 3 or 4 options.”

Tom Ellis was present related to a staff change; Roger who managed the design phase is moving out of state so the team for Gloucester will need to be reorganized. They met with MSBA July 17, 2019 to discuss this change. (Was someone from the city at the meeting?) Chris Tremblay will be assisting. “MSBA doesn’t like surprises,” Ellis remarked.

Who does?

The costs and application should be public before it’s forwarded to the state. Chairman Jonathan Pope said he’d forward the pricing.

Presentation

Double click on pictures to enlarge the slides for the “East Gloucester Elementary School Building Committee 7.18.19″. Color coding continues as in yellow = East Gloucester; Blue = Vets; and Green = Green Street area.

And the winner (high scoring) is…

one location at Vets and both at Green

slide 13_scoring finalists_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (16)
slide 13- scoring on final 9 for state

 

REVISED SCHEDULE

“By October we’ll be back on schedule. Yes, MSBA has seen the schedule and is pleased.”

slide 16 _TIMELINE NOW_East Gloucester consolidation costs by Dore & Whittier and School Committee July 18 2019 Gloucester MA (1)
slide 16 revised timeline expectations

 

Reminder! Community meeting July 25 6:30 PM

Fraternity Club Gloucester, Ma

Fraternity Club.jpg

How did we get here?

Catch up posts, documents, links related to Gloucester’s school committee new school buildings/consolidation process: Continue reading “Dore & Whittier School consolidation plans & costs heading to MSBA August 1, 2019”

TONIGHT how much $? Costs associated with new school options slated for reveal

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East Gloucester/Veterans Memorial Elementary School Building Committee

July 18, 2019

5pm District Office Conference Room
2 Blackburn Drive
Gloucester, MA 01930

Agenda here: http://gloucester-ma.gov/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/10791

Estimates of associated costs (all – building, swing space, architects, fees, etc) and eligible reimbursables.

General public invited next week: New schools, big schools, small schools, where? Let’s gather & talk July 25 6:30 PM Fraternity Club #GloucesterMA 

New schools, big schools, small schools, where? July 25 6:30 PM Fraternity Club #GloucesterMA (Dore & Whittier costs reveal tonight 5pm)

Fraternity Club.jpgSAVE THE DATE

July 25, 2019 6:30PM

And when! “Light Up Mattos has rented the Fraternity Club, 27 Webster Street, Gloucester, MA, for a Listening Post on July 25th, 2019 at 6:30 to talk about the possibilities of a 440 student population in Mattos field area, Green Street and East Gloucester school. Together we can ask questions of each other and really see what we all think of having such a large population of students, and perhaps find new ideas, too. Please come and be heard and listen. Together we can make a difference. We will be looking for volunteers to put information flyers in neighbors doors in Mattos field area, Green Street area, West Parish area and East Gloucester area to get the word out. Proposed schools affects us all!” – Light Up Mattos

Gloucester schools | Elementary: East Gloucester, Veterans Memorial, West Parish, Beeman, and Plum Cove; Middle: O’Maley and fields; High School: GHS and fieldhouse

UPCOMING DORE & WHITTIER presentations for NEW SCHOOL(S) AND LIBRARY:

The next new school meeting is TONIGHT- July 18, 2019. Associated costs for limited options slated to be revealed. Goal for submission to the state agency, MSBA, is August 1, 2019. Meeting held in the School admin offices at Blackburn. 5pm.

Catch up on new school building process in these prior posts:

  • July 25, 2019 public community discussion all welcome! Fraternity club 6:30PM
  • July 18, 2019 Dore & Whittier slated to reveal associated rough costs on new builds/construction costs/swing space costs, and eligible reimbursables, for presentation to school committee (no public comment) 5PM
  • July 9, 2019 Dore & Whittier Presentation to City Council (no public comment) scenes (this post) and link to 1623 Studios/Cape Ann TV taping of City Council meeting July 9, 2019 here questions from city councilors following presentation begin at 27:57 minutes
School Committee Dore & Whittier presentation to full City Council July 9 2019 City Hall Kyrouz Auditorium Gloucester MA ©c ryan (6)
City Council meeting July 9, 2019 included presentation by Dore & Whittier for school committee new building options. Chair reminded audience that this meeting was not a public forum and no costs, final sites or options. There was quite a turn out.

 

Oral Communications july 9, 2019:

“Joseph S. Mattos Jr. grew up right up the street from Mattos field at 9 Linnett Place. He came from a patriotic family and chose the Army for his love of animals. Mattos field was dedicated to Joseph in 1935 and was rededicated last October 5th. the 100th. anniversary of his death.  Lt. Maxwell Parsons grew up at 65 Mt. Pleasant Ave. Lt. Maxwell served in the U.S. Army. Lt. Maxwell Parsons Playground was erected by the Gloucester Playground Commission in 1935   Ganine Nancy Doucette grew up at 19 Mt. Vernon St. The Park was dedicated in 1986 in her memory. Mr. John Gus Foote was instrumental in the dedication. Private First Class Doucette wanted to serve her country and almost could not. She died serving her country as she wished.   I am their voice as they have none. I am here today to speak for them all.   Please don’t take their dedicated open space.  Thank you. Patti Amaral”

  • Mattos family letter to the editor HERE Save-Mattos-Field 
  • July 8, 2019 GDT article by Ray Lamont announcing presentation of 9 options to City Council noting that still nothing is final and no costs or reimbursement  details will be available HERE
  • June 26, 2019 School Commitee votes to accept options 1623 Studio (Cape Ann TV) taping HERE questions begin following Dore & Whittier presentation and prior to vote at 1:05 into taping (Joel Favazza, etc,”sounding the alarm about these sites but continually told hold on calm down this is not the time to ask” and now we’re at final options no discussions. “Foreclosing opportunity (for alternatives etc) despite telling community for months there would be chance.” He mentions 12-15 months but the questions about the sites and process go back well before 2015; see selected roundup below)
  • June 20, 2019 School Building Committee votes to accept 9 options to present to school committee (no public comment) HERE 
  • June 20, 2019 Scenes and recap of new building plans presentation June 17 including full text of readings by Patti Amaral and Mary Ann Boucher  also reminder that school building committee to vote on this day for the options to push forward
  • June 17, 2019 Reminder notice of Councilor Memhard Ward meeting about new schools (open to public comments) HERE

“A round up of Pros and Cons related to the recent West Parish construction and its use and operating costs since being built might be helpful. Some West Parish feedback that made the news ranged from small inconveniences (no dishwasher) to larger concerns about design (despite ample site the gymnasium was not designed with enough space for spectators, the design of the parking lot did not take into account ease in snowplowing and numerous vehicular/traffic snafus).  There was no discussion about these proposals within a broader context of all the school properties, all the elementary schools, merging with Rockport, what happens with development of the older sites if Schoolhouse Road option is undertaken, etc.” Big built out schools haven’t demonstrated a reduction in operating costs.  The state is considering policy for livable, innovative, green and walkable communities. You can’t alter special places, build mega schools that everybody needs to drive to, and have walkable, quintessential New England neighborhoods and green communities. Can we request a modified incentive to best match our geography and green goals?

  • Spring 2019, School building committee website set up spring 2019 https://eastgloucesterbuildingproject.weebly.com.
  • October 2018 GMG post MSBA school committee school consolidation update HERE 
  • October 2017 City Begins Quest for new Merged School: Search on for funding for East Gloucester-Veterans study, Gloucester Daily Times article by Ray Lamont HERE
  • In February 2017, the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA), a state agency, moved the Gloucester school consolidation proposal further along in its funding process. The MSBA cost page is here where you will find information and data about schools built either a)2008-2013  or b) 2014-current.  West Parish is in there. (List of MSBA projects completed for Gloucester) MSBA splits out designer and project management phases from the final build which means you have to go back and forth between documents. Expected life span for new buildings is 40 years.
  • September 27, 2016, GMG post, Ward 1 Community Discussion about new elementary schools at East Gloucester Elementary School HERE
  • September 14, 2016 GMG post school consolidation meeting  at West Parish HERE
  • HERE’S A LINK TO THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PLAN PROPOSAL AUGUST 2016
  • January 2015 joint City Council/School Committee meeting; presentation by Dore & Whittier HERE Option A Maintain all four buildings as they are with same number of classes per grade; Option B Make additions and renovations at all four schools; Option C Remove Plum Cove or Veterans and make additions and renovations at other three (2-3 classes per grade); Option D Remove Plum Cove and Veterans and make addition at Beeman (4 classes per grade), with 3 classes per grade at East Gloucester

The next Sawyer Free new building meeting (also Dore & Whittier)

folds into the Trustees meeting 7/23/19 and specifically capital projects Wed 7/24/19 8:30AM.

 

 

Lanesville: Cape Ann Finns Literary History featuring Univ. Helsinki Prof. Kirsti Salmi Niklander

Lanesville community center_20181018_©c ryan.jpg

Great programming at Lanesville Community Center  like this special event next week with a visiting scholar. You can help with research! Check your family libraries:

Cape Ann Finns:   A Literary History
Tuesday, July 23rd, 3-5:00 p.m.

Prof. Kirsti Salmi-Niklander of the University of Helsinki will lecture on newly-discovered materials in the rich Finnish-American literary history of Lanesville and Rockport, where Finn Halls and families shared books, newspapers, political broadsheets, poems, and songbooks in Finnish.    Salmi-Niklander’s research has uncovered the 1903-1925 issues of the hand-written newspaper Walotar, which would have been read aloud at meetings of the Salon Leimu Temperance Society in Rockport.   Also found are an 1899 children’s primary reader and other books reflecting both the immigrants’s strong ties to Finland and their evolving assimilation in America, including the development of “Finglish”, a unique blend of Finnish and English languages.   Prof. Salmi-Niklander would also be delighted to see other Finnish-American literature from Cape Ann, so if you have inherited some old books or newspapers and can find them in your attic or on your bookshelf, please bring these along to the lecture.  All to be enjoyed with the traditional afternoon coffee and Nisu.

Summer 2019

☀☀🌻🌻🌻HAPPY SUMMERTIME LANESVILLE🌻🌻🌻☀☀
🍦🍦🍦🍦August 4th ICE CREAM SOCIAL🍦🍦🍦🍦
and Childrens Program 4-6pm
Come Enjoy Ice Cream and selected readings from “Life Story” by Virginia Lee Burton
Check out your local weekly classes at the Community Center
☯Power Yoga with Paige Amaral☯
Monday Nights 7-8:15pm
☯Karate with Matt Natti☯
Tuesday and Thursday Nights 7:00-8:30pm
All are Welcome

Long Beach Little Cape Hedge Rockport MA

Historic maps and books from the 1800s label the landform between Cape Hedge Beach and Long Beach “Little Cape Hedge” or “Cape Hedge”, and the creek “Saratoga River”. I’ve heard the former (also “Eagle Rock”),  but not the latter. So many generations of families return to Long Beach cottages. Do you remember family names for these coastal landmarks?

© c ryan 20190713_Long Beach Eagle Rock Rockport Ma Gloucester MA.jpg

Sue Bonior photography exhibit opens in Rockport and printing by Cape Ann Giclee

SUE BONIOR SUMMER PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT

Open Sundays July 18-August 30th or by appointment

press release:

The Unitarian Universalist Society of Rockport (UUSR) is hosting its 4th annual photography exhibit by Rockport native Sue Bonior, July 18 through August 30. 

The gallery features many new works with a lens focused on Cape Ann vistas and nature portraits from shoreline to hillsides, fields, gardens, quarries and woods. 

Thirty full color images are mounted on stretched canvas by Cape Ann Giclee of Gloucester. Reprints of previously exhibited images may also be ordered at this time.

View the exhibit with the artist on Sunday afternoons in August, 3-5 pm at UUSR, 4 Cleaves Street, Rockport, or by appointment via email at suemac292@gmail.com. A portion of sales will benefit UUSR’s work in the community.

Sue Bonior After the rain

Sue Bonior Rockport Waterfront

Whales spotted from shore! Jeanne Blake photographs moments between Long Beach and Good Harbor Beach, Gloucester Mass.

photos from Jeanne Blake July 10, 2019 – whale(s) passing back and forth

 

 

Video from Cliff- whale blows (look at left of frame at 30 sec mark in the distance) and bubbles or whale footprint at center. Ten minutes prior, observers describe seeing a dramatic whale breach. They could see the whale from its back and it was so far out of the water both fins visible.

 

slick after breach or bubbles_whale blow distant right side frame_Gloucester MA.jpg

Perhaps these are the same minke whales spotted off Halibut Point July 9, 2019 mentioned in  today’s GDT here:  “On Monday, Rockport native John Parisi spotted two whales off the coast of Halibut Point on Monday while fishing with his son and his son’s friend. “We were fishing for stripers,” said Parisi. “There were a lot of porgies jumping out of the water. Then there was a huge commotion with the fish. I looked over and saw these two whales breach the ocean with their dorsal fins.” Parisi’s video here 

Mayor Theken shares art newsletter from Mass Cultural Council

Gloucester Mayor Romeo Theken shares the Massachusetts Cultural Council July 2019 newsletter. Enjoy!

mayor theken shares mcc newsletter July 2019

Through our Community Initiative, Mass Cultural Council works to support all 351 cities and towns in the Commonwealth. Over the last two years, our Cultural Compact pilot program supported a new and innovative approach to elevating arts and culture in communities.

Mass Cultural Council’s Cultural Compact pilot provided funding to create formal partnerships, via signed agreement, in six communities – Worcester, Springfield, Pittsfield, Lynn, New Bedford, and Harwich. We brought together municipal leaders, Local Cultural Councils, and Cultural Districts to work together to deepen the commitment of arts and culture in communities and strengthen relationships with those who support and create art in communities. READ MORE

Featured Festivals

Celebrate the vibrancy of our communities at these festivals – and more – throughout the season:

 

On the Podcast Engaging Diverse Artists

Listen now or read the episode transcript

Opportunities & Resources

Guidelines are available for National Endowment for the Arts’ Our Town grants. Grants support projects that integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes. Apply by Aug. 8, 2019.

Mass Cultural Council’s Festivals grants of $500 for festivals taking place from Sept. 1, 2018 – Feb 29, 2020 are now available. Applications will be reviewed on a “first-received, first-reviewed” basis. Regional diversity will be taken into consideration as part of the application review process. Apply by Sept. 16, 2019.

The next Letter of Inquiry deadline for Mass HumanitiesProject Grants is Sept. 9, 2019. Nonprofit and government organizations that serve Mass. residents are eligible to apply. Project Grants support public humanities programming in almost all formats, including lectures, reading-and-discussion series, exhibits, walking tours, film pre-production and distribution projects, teacher education projects, and out-of-school humanities enrichment programs. To commemorate the centennial of the 19th Amendment, they are prioritizing funding public programs that use the humanities to explore voting rights in America.

PolicyLink has released Working with Artists to Deepen Impact, the first in a series of briefs documenting lessons/stories from ArtPlace’s Community Development Investments.

National Endowment for the Arts’ Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design™ offers funding and technical assistance to communities with populations of 50,000 or less to address local economic and quality of life challenges through design solutions. Apply by July 22, 2019. Office hours available through Facebook on July 10, 1-2pm.

New England Foundation for the Art’s National Dance Project Travel Fund provides monetary assistance for U.S. based presenters, curatorial staff, and residency directors or for current NDP artist grantees to connect in person to explore feasibility of presenting NDP-funded works Rolling deadline.

Who’s Coming? Respectful Audience Surveying Toolkit, a new resource from OF/BY/FOR ALL, provides step-by-step tools to help you write a survey, share it with a truly random slice of your audience, and analyze the results.

In the News

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Gloucester Daily Times: New School Options presented to City Council July 9, 2019

State to See Nine Options for New School: Officials hoping to present officials with override in spring, front page story by Ray Lamont, Gloucester Daily Times July 8, 2019

Read the article here

” Dore & Whittier is to present the options — without a firm design or pricing — to the City Council at its meeting Tuesday, July 9.”

“Pope emphasized that, while the council does not have approval authority over a school project, the School Committee is looking for an endorsement of the project concept.”

Gloucester Daily Times notice for New school buildings presentation to city council_20190708_085042 (2)

 

Prior post June 20, 2019 here

Frank Numerosi FN Productions documentary short | portrait of artist Jason Burroughs – Montgomery’s Boat Yard #GloucesterMA

Frank Numerosi, FN Productions, portrait of fine artist Jason Burroughs

Jason Burroughs – Montgomery’s Boat Yard Filmed & Edited by: FN Productions (Frankie Numerosi) Jasonburroughsgallery.com

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (1)

 

courtesy photo FN productions Gloucester MA short doc artist Jason Burroughs (2)

Jason Burrough paintings_3 completed_one in process_20190624_©c ryan