Thru March 30 | Donna Ardizzoni, Leslie Galacar among 18 artists in 3rd annual Cape Ann Through Artists’ Eyes exhibit at Manchester Historical Museum

Installation views of the 3rd annual Cape Ann Through Artists’ Eyes spring show and sale at Manchester Historical Museum. The 2019 exhibiting Cape Ann artists are: John Abisamra; Barby Almy; Donna Ardizzoni; Bob Allia; Mary Barker; Jessica Biker; Martha Parrish Chapman; Kathleen Chrzanowski; Kathleen Connelly; Melissa Cox, ; Bonnie Faulkner; Leslie Galacar; Ann Guyer; Olga Hayes; Fred Kepler; Ken King; Gary Linder; and Mike Storella.

INSTALLATION VIEW_Cape Ann Through Artists' Eyes 2019 Manchester Historical Museum group show_20190306_©catherine ryan (2).jpg

from Beth Welin:

The Manchester Historical Museum  invites visitors to explore scenes of Cape Ann at the 3rd annual spring exhibit and art sale – Cape Ann through Artists’ Eyes. See the creative work on display featuring paintings and photography by eighteen local artists. This free exhibit runs through March during the Museum’s regular hours: Tuesdays – Fridays from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. with a closing reception on Saturday, March 30 (10:00 am -1:00 pm). 

Once Upon A Contest Selections from Cape Ann Reads opens April 6, 2019.

Director Beth Welin explains that two community exhibitions are scheduled each year along with permanent and special exhibits. Manchester’s 375th Anniversary is 2020. For more info contact the Manchester Historical Museum by phone at 978-526-723, e-mail at info@manchesterhistoricalmuseum.org, or visit their website at http://www.manchesterhistoricalmuseum.org

 

Week 2 Defending Gloucester | Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School – good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Over six weeks I’m posting local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students.

Mr. Goulart’s LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK TWO

WEEK 2 of 6: DEFENDING GLOUCESTER

Location #1

  • Who was the first governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony?
    • Go to the location of the fort named after him and take a picture with a member in it.
    • During which war did it receive this name?

Location #2

  • Take a picture at Fort Point with the former location of the Coast Guard Aviation Station behind you (must be visible in the picture)
  • What was the fort called on Fort Point?
  • Name a war it was utilized in.

Location #3

  • From Fort Point go to the location of the seven-gun earthwork battery and barracks in ramparts field. Take a picture with the old towers in the background (do not go on private property)
  • Name a war it was utilized in?

Screenshot

  • Screenshot Google Earth with all three above locations in it and circle them. Submit the image.

Prior Posts

3/14/19 Week One results

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

 

Sort, Roll, Inspect, Repeat – Mary Ann’s descendant & construction progress on Long Beach seawall

Construction work continues on the Long Beach seawall at 3 compromised sections: two 500′ sections (one is closer to the Gloucester edge and the second pretty much mid beach) and a third 30′ area of trouble at the corner by the creek and footbridge. Last summer’s temporary pyres have been vastly expanded with truckloads of boulders from Johnson’s Quarry. The line of boulders helps to prevent sand from being scoured away by seas and the bottom of the wall from further erosion. The rip rap will add ballast support weight.

Besides the crew at Long Beach, the second unit labors at the quarry. It’s slow and careful going impacted by weather and tides. This week was busy. Next week’s conditions are less favorable. Extra time is allotted to make certain heavy equipment beats the tides or the very real possibility of large equipment breaks or malfunction (thankfully has not happened yet). People wondered if a jetty or two was in the works but that is simply temporary staging.

Boulders are deposited at the Gloucester entrance to the beach and transferred to repair sites. Excavators work with Rockport DPW and GZA engineers for optimum selection. (GZA was contracted for Gloucester’s Stacy Boulevard work.) “Spotters” can be seen atop the Long Beach walkway. After the boulders are dumped into piles, the excavator sorts, lifts, rolls and inspects the whole lot and singles like searching for an impossibly hard to find puzzle piece. Sometimes one boulder is turned 15x before it’s the correct pitch or timing. The sorting was remarkably graceful and reminded me of rinsing and prepping berries or beans.

One day at Long Beach I spotted a swimmer with a glorious and faithful arm tattoo of Mary Ann from Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. He was staying at Cape Ann Motor Inn. Did he know that the author and illustrator, Virginia Lee Burton, was from Gloucester? He was stunned and thrilled. She modeled the steam shovel after one she brought her son to see busy building Gloucester High School. Families with little construction fans might enjoy watching Mary Ann’s descendant shoring up the Long Beach seawall.

The timeline for permits and planning for a future sand phase have not been slated.

Long Beach seawall Gloucester Rockport Ma_20190315_© cryan

 

 

TOMORROW Beer & Wine Tasting at Gloucester House for GHS Docksiders

annual spring Booster for GHS Docksiders –  Wine and Beer Tasting at The Gloucester House on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at 6:30PM.

Docksiders 2019

You can buy a ticket or donate at Alexandra’s Bread, 265 Main Street, Gloucester

RESULTS WEEK 1 | try Mr. Goulart’s local history hunt #GloucesterMA Throwback Thursday

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan
Gloucester, Mass.- Great teacher at Gloucester High School, Shaun Goulart, creates a local history scavenger hunt trivia game for his 9th grade students that takes place weekly for 6 weeks. We’re taking the challenge one week after the students. Good luck!

ANSWERS TO SHAUN GOULART’S LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK ONE

 

How did you do? Week one delved into the history of Cape Pond Ice. More than one player “had to call a friend”, Scott Memhard, owner of Cape Pond Ice and City Councilor. He kindly shared supplemental archival material included in this post. Stop here if you prefer to go back to see questions only from 3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

Continue to scroll for the answers.

 

courtesy photo from Scott Memhard Cape Pond Ice Gloucester Mass (3)

1)In 1848 a blacksmith named Nathaniel R. Webster started a company by damming a local brook. What did the brook become known as?  ANSWER. VETERANS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CAMPUS

2)What did Webster’s company become known as? ANSWER. CAPE POND ICE

3)Take a picture at the present day location of the company 

20160718_© catherine ryan.jpg

4)Take a picture of the street named after him with a member in it. ANSWER. WEBSTER STREET

5)What is in place of the brook today?  MATTOS FIELD-  ABOVE = FRAT CLUB AND BELOW EVENTUALLY LEADS INTO LITTLE RIVER AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH

WATER PATH.jpg

6)Take a picture at the location of the old dam with a member in front. ANSWER. THE SCHOOL

 

 

 

PART II

7)A competitor to Webster named Francis W. Homans in 1876 created a 32 acre man-made lake. What is the lake known as? ANSWER. FERNWOOD LAKE

 

 

8)Submit a screenshot of a map of the lake (Google Maps or Google Earth)

Fernwood lake.jpg

9)What year did the two companies merge? ANSWER. 1908

Courtesy photos below from Scott Memhard, Cape Pond Ice, Cape Ann Museum

 

 

Courtesy photo from David Collins-

“My grandfather, Millard Collins, Sr., worked for one of the ice houses for a while. He died in 1918 at age 29 in the Spanish Flu pandemic. At that time he was working for LePages’s and had taken a leave of absence to care for his brother, Jacob, who had contracted the flu first. Jacob died October 17, 1918, and my grandfather died October 28, 1918…”

“I’m enclosing a picture of my grandfather and his horse-drawn ice wagon. You can see the word “ICE” faintly written on the inside back of the wagon. The youngster atop the horse is my father, who was born in July,1912, so I date the picture to about 1913 or so.”

courtesy photo from david collins.jpg

Prior Posts

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

 

2019 Marine Endangered Species Art Contest | share wonderful NOAA opportunity with young artists!

Celebrate Endangered Species Day (May 17) and the International Year of the Salmon by having your classroom participate in the Greater Atlantic Region’s Marine Endangered Species Art Contest. “We invite Massachusetts schools as well as schools from anywhere in the U.S. and beyond to submit entries!…In addition to school entries, home school and individual entries are welcome.” Submissions are due April 19th and selections will be featured in a group show at Gloucester’s NOAA headquarters. Last year (photos below of 2018 group show) I noticed some Massachusetts schools participated including Manchester and Beverly. 

Read more about the contest guidelines and prizes Continue reading “2019 Marine Endangered Species Art Contest | share wonderful NOAA opportunity with young artists!”

Gloucester Manship Artists Residency + Studios nominated for a Commonwealth Award

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The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) announced 13 finalists vying for the Massachusetts 2019 Commonwealth Awards including Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester, Mass!

press release from MARS:

The Manship Artists Residency + Studios aka MARS is a finalist for the 2019 Commonwealth Awards. Announcing the thirteen 2019 finalists, Mass Cultural Council Executive Director Anita Walker said “​The Commonwealth Award is the highest honor in the arts and culture in Massachusetts. It is a celebration of the best of the best and a demonstration of the Power of Culture to enrich us all. This extraordinary group of awardees exemplifies our state’s unique cultural fabric. Their collective and individual achievements have made us a better Commonwealth.”
​ The Manship Artists Residency + Studios is recognized as an exemplary grassroots effort that brought together the skills, talents, and resources to save a local treasure with national importance as an innovative cultural resource for today and for future generations.

Established as a national and international, interdisciplinary artists residency and cultural hub, MARS has been developing partnerships and alliances with local, regional and international organizations in order to enrich and enhance existing public offerings, as well as to introduce new and exciting creative opportunities. For example, the first cohort of artists that worked at the Manship site were selected by a curator of the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy in Andover and were included in an exhibition there on sculptor Paul Manship’s legacy this past fall and winter. ​Local artists also will benefit in many ways – indeed, the first “visiting” artist in January 2017 was Gloucester resident Diane KW. And, among the first “resident’ artists who will begin to stay at the Manship home as soon as renovations are completed on the residence this Spring is Lara Lepionka, a Gloucester artist and social justice activist, who has achieved wide acclaim for her award-winning nonprofit, Backyard Growers.

In addition to visiting and resident artists, MARS welcomes other innovators and cultural leaders. Thus far MARS has hosted a Smithsonian museum conservator, a Metropolitan Museum curator, an independent Maine filmmaker, as well as a dance troupe from New York City. In July 2018, MARS’ hosted its first public event: Quarry Dance VII, a collaboration with Windhover Performing Arts Center attracted over 1000 guests to four free public showings of the site-specific performance. MARS will offer similar signature public events each summer, including exhibitions, installations and performances. The first exhibition at MARS will open the house to the public with artwork by Willie “Loco” Alexander. While Willie is known internationally as a musical pioneer, few have had the pleasure of experiencing his paintings and collages first-hand. MARS is also engaged in educational outreach. Thanks to a generous donor, MARS purchased an original Folly Cove Designer Acorn Press and has loaned this cultural treasure to the O’Maley Innovation Middle School for the use of local students and artists. This loan compliments the Folly Cove Designer (FCD) curriculum that was established in the schools by the Cape Ann Museum several years ago.
MARS Advisor Catherine Amidon commented that “​It is always exciting and inspiring when a young organization such as MARS receives recognition for their achievement along with a prominent list of seasoned and accomplished cultural colleagues. MARS’ success is a tribute to the support and guidance of the Mass Cultural Council, and to the generosity of local artists and collaborators, of donors who have invested wisely and who wanted to support the hard work of MARS’ board members, their advisors, and the incredible volunteers who have brought MARS this far in such a short time. Were it not for this collective effort, MARS would not be here today.​ ”

● For more information on the MCC Commonwealth Awards contact ​Carmen Plazas​, Communications Manager, 617-858-2738.

● For the Manship Project, contact Rebecca Reynolds, Founder and Board President, (978) 290-8438. MARS’ web site is ​www.manshipartists.org Follow @manshipartists on facebook, twitter and instagram

GMG Paul Manship historic artist home and studio purchase Sept 2017 

Manships exhibition and fundraiser for MARS

Motif Monday: Fitz Henry Lane house #GloucesterMA

The stone jug was the historic studio and home of the artist Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865) located on Harbor Loop in downtown Gloucester, Massachusetts. The city owns the building. Schooner Adventure, one of the city’s national historic landmarks, and fabulous Sail GHS work from here. Both are willing to share limited space with a cultural residency. I hope one day the Lane house may be recreated as an historic artist home and studio celebrating the artist and Gloucester and as such serve as a mini welcome center. Part of the maintenance and operating costs and helping the two organizations on site might be off set by integrating the Lane use back in some capacity. The Winslow Homer property in Portland has done well and is open for guided tours on specific days and times. It does not have staff on site.

Fitz Henry Lane home March 7, 2019 snow

 

 

Making Jokes During a Presentation Helps Men But Hurts Women

women’s history month- article from Harvard Business Review

Making Jokes During a Presentation Helps Men But Hurts Women”

ouch

“…However, our research suggests that the benefits of humor do not extend to everyone — women may actually be harmed by using humor at work. We find that when men add humor to a business presentation, observers view them as having higher levels of status (that is, respect or prestige) within the organization, and give them higher performance ratings and leadership capability assessments compared to when they do not include humor. However, when women add the same humor to the same presentation, people view them as having lower levels of status, rate their performance as lower, and consider them less capable as leaders…”

Research by Jonathan Evans , Jerel Slaughter, Aleksander Ellis and Jessi Rivin 

Group show of Essex Heritage 2018 Photo contest winners at Salem Visitor Center

News from Essex National Heritage- Congratulations to all the winners including Amy Smith of Gloucester:

Essex Heritage Announces Winners of 2018 Photo Contest

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 Essex National Heritage Area Photo Contest. The annual photo contest encourages photographers of all levels to “capture” the living landscapes, unique places, and interesting people of Essex County, MA. The contest is presented in partnership with Hunt’s Photo & Video, the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission, and the National Park Service at Salem Maritime and Saugus Iron Works National Historic Sites.

From rocky coasts and harbors and rural farms to historic downtowns and parks, photographers vividly captured a variety of special places in Essex County for their award-winning submissions to this year’s contest. All of the photographs were taken within the Essex National Heritage Area and fell into the categories of “Off the Beaten Path,” “People of Essex County,” and “A Closer Look.”

2018 Essex National Heritage Area Photo Contest Winners
Grand Prize Winner
• “Waves,” taken in Salem by Laurence Spang of Salem

Category: A Closer Look
• 1st Prize: “Sunflower, All For Me,” taken in Newbury by Ken Jordan of Lynn
• 2nd Prize: “Storm Damage,” taken in Salisbury by Caroline Stella of Saugus
• 3rd Prize: “Head Sails,” taken in Gloucester by Frank Conahan of Groton

Category: People Of Essex County
• 1st Prize: “Sandstorm,” taken in Ipswich by Kristin Bender Kyllingstad of Beverly
• 2nd Prize: “Essex Tech Teaching Moment,” taken in Danvers by Sue Plutsky of Beverly
• 3rd Prize: “Winter Hop” taken in Peabody by Judy Schneider of Middleton

Category: Off The Beaten Path
• 1st Prize: “Walking on Clouds” taken in Gloucester by Sarah Burrows of Wenham
• 2nd Prize: “Appleton,” taken in Ipswich by Amy Smith of Gloucester
• 3rd Prize: “Nature’s Window,” taken in Manchester by the Sea by Stephen Dagley of Beverly

People’s Choice Winner
• “Monarch and Thistle,” Taken in Haverhill by Kathy Diamontopoulos of Haverhill

Instagram Winners

New to the Essex Heritage Photo Contest was an Instagram category. Instagrammer were encouraged to tag photos that they took during 2018 with #essexheritagephotocontest. Over 450 photos were entered and 9 winners were selected for their stunning shots that captured the special quality of Essex County. The accounts that won the Instagram category are as follows: @a.a.g.photo, @dcmills89, @funky_monkey_photos, @harbors_edge_photography, @lomachusetts, @saltwaterlabphoto, @sarahtracyburrows, @sjdagley, @tugapeaks

 

Group Show in 2019 for the 2018 contest winners

The eleven winning images will be exhibited for one year at the National Park Service Visitor Center in Salem (2 New Liberty Street, Salem, MA 01970) and at the office of the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission (160 Main Street, Haverhill, MA 01830).

Essex National Heritage 2018 Photo contest winners exhibited in group show at Salem Visitor Center 2019.jpg
See all the winning photographs on the Essex Heritage Facebook page: www.facebook.com/EssexHeritage

Prints for the Essex National Heritage Area Photo Contest exhibits were generously provided by Hunt’s Photo & Video. Prizes for the Photo Contest were generously contributed by Hunt’s Photo & Video and the National Park Service.

About Essex Heritage and the Essex National Heritage Area
Essex Heritage is the non-profit organization that manages the Essex National Heritage Area by developing programs that enhance, preserve and encourage recreation, education, conservation and interpretation projects on Boston’s North Shore and the Lower Merrimack River Valley. The Essex National Heritage Area is comprised of the 34 cities and towns of Essex County, MA. For more information, visit EssexHeritage.org or call (978) 740-0444.

City Auditor Kenny Costa on Excellence in Financial Reporting Award and more GOOD NEWS! Well done Mayor Romeo Theken Administration #GloucesterMA

One of many precepts for life that artist and friend, Michael Mazur, impressed upon me: make sure and celebrate life’s ta-dah moments. Here are a range of recent bright announcements and achievements in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Congratulations Mayor Romeo Theken, administration, departments, city staff — well done to all involved!

Kenny Costa, City Auditor, describes a major award for Gloucester, with Jim Destino and John Dunn at full City Council on February 13, 2019:

Gloucester receives Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting

City Auditor Kenny Costa presentation to City Council about major award financial reporting_20190213_© catherine ryan

City Auditor and Jim Destino with City Council_20190213_Gloucester MA major recognition for accounting reporting

“The City issued a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for Fiscal Year 2017.  The City was awarded for the first time the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for our Fiscal Year 2017 financial audit report also known as the CAFR.  This achievement is nationally recognized and its the highest form of financial reporting.  This is a great achievement for the City and a credit to our finance team.  The preparation of the report was a total team effort.  This achievement will be favorable to the bond rating agencies.  The Finance Team is very proud of this achievement.  We’re proud to be one of only 40 communities in Massachusetts to accomplish this.” – Kenny Costa, City Auditor

You can read the full report here: Gloucester CAFR 

He expects Gloucester to make this target annually from here on.

Sampling of more recent good news:

 

  • Plans settled for YMCA at Gloucester Crossing

 

 

  • New UMASS grant from Seaport Economic Council Sean Horgan writes in the Gloucester Daily Times “The University of Massachusetts system, which includes UMass Amherst’s Gloucester Marine Station at Hodgkins Cove, received a $276,854 grant from the council to identify economic growth opportunities for the Massachusetts commercial fishing industry.”

 

 

Peabody Essex Museum selects Brian Kennedy as new Director following Dan Monroe’s retirement

That makes two new museum directors taking charge on the North Shore in 2019 – Brian Kennedy at PEM and Oliver Barker at Cape Ann Museum.
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The news from Toledo’s perspective
Toledo Museum of Art director Brian Kennedy leaving in June by Roberta Gedert for The Blade March 10, 2019

“Brian Kennedy, the Toledo Museum of Art’s ninth director since its founding in 1901, will leave his post in June to lead the nation’s oldest continuously operating art museum.

Mr. Kennedy, who has been with the TMA since 2010, is moving to become the director of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., it was announced Thursday. His last day with the Toledo museum is June 30, and he admitted during an interview with The Blade in his office that the decision has a bittersweet quality.”

PEM new director.jpg

No official release from PEM, see news from Salem in the GDT   and the Boston Globe

 

 

What makes a #GreatTeacher? Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School! Week 1 of 6- good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Knowing how much Gloucester fans enjoy history and hearing when it’s integrated into the school curriculum, I thought GMG readers would like to know about a Local History Trivia game 2019 by Gloucester High School teacher, Shaun Goulart, AND to give it a go!

And who doesn’t like a great teacher story?

For the next six weeks I’ll post local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger hunt project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students. No thoughts about what the prize could be for this tandem run.

I’ll post the quiz just after the students’ weekly deadline, and post the answers the following Wednesday. Leave your answers in the comments below( or email) — first all correct submission will earn top points.

GHS Gloucester Mass_20190129_© catherine Ryan

The GMG point structure for Shaun Goulart’s local history trivia hunt 2019 will be as follows:

  • First submission correct on first day, Sunday  = 5 points
  • Submitted Correctly first day, Sunday = 4 points
  • Submitted Correctly second day, Monday  = 3 points
  • Submitted Correctly third day, Tuesday = 2 points
  • Submitted Correctly Wednesday = 1 point

LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK ONE

1)In 1848 a blacksmith named Nathaniel R. Webster started a company by damming a local brook. What did the brook become known as?

2)What did Webster’s company become known as?

3)Take a picture at the present day location of the company (selfie or with a member in it)

4)Take a picture of the street named after him with a member in it.

5)What is in place of the brook today?

6)Take a picture at the location of the old dam with a member in front.

PART II

7)A competitor to Webster named Francis W. Homans in 1876 created a 32 acre man-made lake. What is the lake known as?

8)Submit a screenshot of a map of the lake (Google Maps or Google Earth)

9)What year did the two companies merge?

*We’ll see how the photo part plays out. Maybe there’s a bonus for great photos 🙂

snow_20190306_Gloucester Mass © catherine ryan
What fun from teacher Shaun Goulart! The answers could be anywhere out there

Awesome Easter Island head snow sculpture in #GloucesterMA yard

Gloucester, MA. The March 4, 2019 winter storm dropped great snow for sculpting. Check out the “Gloucester Island” snowman on Hartz Street near Jeff’s Variety thankfully lasting as long as the weather stays cold.

Gloucester Island_ snowman yard sculpture_20190307_Gloucester MA_© catherine ryan

 

Please leave a comment if you know of another must see snow sculpture in Gloucester.

Today’s paper | #GloucesterMA Ocean Alliance in the news and update from DR

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Sean Horgan article for Gloucester Daily Times “Ocean Alliance Planning Innovation Center at Paint Factory” includes rendering of restoring 2 former sites for new use

View past Paint Factory Ocean alliance _20190306_Gloucester MA_© catherine ryan

March 5, 2019 Message from Iain Kerr – update on Ocean Alliance research trip off the coast of the Dominican Republic studying breeding humpback whales 

“It gives me great pleasure to advise you that our last 3 days on the water have been fantastic, each day better than the previous. The weather has fallen into a typical trade wind scenario, calm in the early morning and picking up as the day goes on. We were on the boat this morning by 6:15 and had the pleasure of watching a sunrise at sea (with a whale of course).

Today we had our 1st sample by 7:15 am and had our 9th sample by 9:00 am, by 12:30 (when the winds picked up) we had collected a total of 14 samples bringing our expedition total to 54. Our goal was 50 samples, so we are now ahead of the game with 3 days to go. As the sun rose we were with a mother, calf and escort, we collected two Snot samples from each whale so we could have comparable samples, then we collected another sample from each whale flying at a higher altitude than the first set so that we can try to determine what effect height might have on the success/productivity of the biological data (snot) that gets onto the dish.

Angie Sremba is here from Dr. Scott Bakers lab at Oregon State, Angie has been focusing on the DNA analysis. She brought us some exciting information with regards to how our biological data capabilities have (successfully) evolved over time. It is important to remember here that part of this whole process is developing the collection tools and protocols and while Dr. Bakers lab is developing the preservation and analysis protocols. In summary in 2016 we had a 39% success rate with regards to sexing the animals from the DNA and a 55% success rate on the mitochondrial DNA. In 2018 we had a 92% success rate with regards to sexing the animals from the DNA and a 96% success rate with the mitochondrial DNA. This is clearly exciting as it demonstrates that we are learning and getting better on all fronts.

Another exciting data point today was the collection of some whale feces, the whales here are not feeding so it is unusual to find feces in this location. I think this is another amazing benefit of using drones for whale research, the drone saw the whale defecation (look very carefully for the brown stain in the last photo) and Britta and Andy were ready to collect it. This will prove invaluable in trying to put into context the hormone levels that we collect in the blow. 

We had a number of fun whale moments today but one of the best ones was a mother and Calf lob tailing together (lifting their tails up and crashing them down onto the water). The mother would throw her tail down with an enormous crash and then the baby would do the same hardly making a splash. Andy caught one of these moments on camera (see attached photo).

Today we also did some sea trials with EarBot, after this expedition I will have four days at home and then Chris and I go to Cabo San Lucas with EarBot to work on a BBC special, so we need to make sure that EarBot is in tip top shape. Last but not least I am happy to report that this blog is supported by some amazing photos from Christian Miller and Andy Rogan.

I fly out on Thursday, so I plan to do one more blog tomorrow. I hope to report on some more EarBot and Hydrophone recordings so I can attach some Humpback whale songs from the DR, and attach a few more amazing photos.

Best Fishes from the DR. 

Iain Kerr http://www.whale.org

ARKR2117
“We had a number of fun whale moments today but one of the best ones was a mother and Calf lob tailing together (lifting their tails up and crashing them down onto the water). The mother would throw her tail down with an enormous crash and then the baby would do the same hardly making a splash.” courtesy photo by Andy Rogan for Ocean Alliance

 

courtesy photos for Ocean Alliance by Christian Miller:

 

Chronicle Re-Airing “Women on the Coastal Byway” on 3/8 just in time for spring travel plans

“WCVB #Chronicle 5: Along #MAshoreline scenic byway, a sisterhood of shops invites browsing” All images in this post are from the Chronicle story shot by Carl Vieira

CHRONICLE Business Meeting the Women of the Byway, Ipswich
STILL FROM CHRONICLE VIDEO, meet the women of the Byway, trail #5 Olde Ipswich Shop & Gallery, Ipswich

“…Many of those entrepreneurs are women that (narrator) may have met on a very scenic north shore shopping trail!”

“(Narrator) The Essex Scenic Coastal Byway. Ninety miles of salt marsh and working waterfronts, dotted with famous clam shacks, antique stores, and open coastal dreamscapes, stretching from Lynn to Salisbury. The (Essex) Coastal (Scenic) Byway is ONE OF THE PRETTIEST, MOST INTERESTING and DISTINCTIVE DRIVES IN THE STATE. Now you can approach it from a distinctly feminine point of view. A group of women have joined forces to market themselves with a brochure, a sort of coastal byway treasure map.”

Fun route is easy to follow– original trail below. The map has been updated twice since the endeavor began. Look for fun events throughout 2019~

#1 Pauline’s Gifts, Gloucester
#2 Essex Bird Shop & Pet Supply, Essex
#3 Sea Meadow Gifts and Gardens, Essex
#4 The Essex Exchange, Essex
#5 Olde Ipswich Shop & Gallery, Ipswich*
#6 AnnTiques, Ipswich
#7 Be Modern, Ipswich
#8 Lost Treasures, Rowley
#9 Serendipity at Todd’s Farm, Rowley

Byway CHRONICLE Business Meeting the Women of the Byway

#GloucesterMA a foot of snow at daybreak March 4 2019 winter storm

Snapshots during the snowstorm. Snow fell at a quick clip and was deeper than I expected. I saw two snow plows stuck and digging out. Today will be a heavy shovel that neighbors may need help with.

near Cape Ann Motor Inn Long Beach 

 

 

Salt Island Road to Good Harbor Beach- snow deeper than my boots on the dry sand

 

 

Snow blue ice in the tucks and shadows, and trees coated like Kancamagus Highway

 

 

measuring snow fall by mailbox and car coating

 

ON the radio: “Hi this is Elizabeth from Gloucester…” Wait wait don’t tell me NPR news quiz

WWDTM_logo_clr_stacked_highresDid you catch this week’s  witty radio mainstay “Wait wait don’t tell me?” Legions of fans of Wait Wait follow host Peter Sagal’s chatter and quip call-in format with listeners. He most always asks them where they’re calling from.  So what did he say when Elizabeth Stephens declared she’s from here?

PETER SAGAL: “I love Gloucester.”

Have a listen and thanks to John and Alexandra from Alexandra’s Bread in Gloucester, Massachusetts, for sharing.  Congratulations to caller Elizabeth Stephens! I’d love to hear more about what it was like and how it came about. And the mystery greenhouse you’ll be managing? Great fun to hear you and Gloucester on the radio.

 

Wait wait dont tell me Aaron Sorkin March 2 2019

 

transcript excerpt and link to full show below the break

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT… DON’T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. Let me toss your salad. I’m…

(LAUGHTER)

KURTIS: I’m Bill-samic (ph) vinaigrette.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

KURTIS: I’m Bill Kurtis. And here is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. Thanks, everybody.

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: We have a wonderful show for you today because we are going to fix Washington…

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: …By which I mean one of the great disappointments about Washington is that it’s nothing like “The West Wing.” We want the real Washington to have snappy dialogue, the soaring speeches, the perfect comebacks. And then we want it to be canceled.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, later in the show, Aaron Sorkin himself, the creator of “The West Wing” and “The Social Network” and “The Newsroom,” will come on to punch up reality itself. But first, we are interested in your snappy dialogue, so give us a call. The number is 1-888-WAIT-WAIT – that’s 1-888-924-8924.

Now let’s welcome our first listener contestant. Hi, you are on WAIT WAIT… DON’T TELL ME.

ELIZABETH STEPHENS: Hi. This is Elizabeth Stephens, and I’m from Gloucester, Mass.

SAGAL: Gloucester.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Hey.

SAGAL: I love Gloucester.

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: What do you do there?

Link to the complete episode

transcript for this portion of the show: https://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=699562979