Mola Mola

These are definitely the strangest fish going.   I remember seeing my first sunfish years ago and I thought it was a fish that had been cut in half by a shark or something.  As nuts as it sounds, they actually have funny little personalities.  This one came right up to us…quickly I might add.  They’re pretty fast when they want to be.

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3 thoughts on “Mola Mola

  1. Try as I may, I could not discern front from back, up from down, or side from side! This is a Doctor Dolittle push-me/pull-you fish!

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  2. We saw one around noon on last Saturday, August 18th. It was drifting into the cove, past the Lobster Pool restaurant, on an incoming tide and three of our divers swam over on the surface to examine it. The episode lasted several minutes before the divers submerged and it swam back out of the cove on the surface. It was amazing and thrilling to see it up close. “…the size of a coffee table…” one of the floating divers exclaimed.

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  3. Hi: I am hoping that folks can report their sightings of basking sharks and ocean sunfish to http://www.nebshark.org. This community-sighting network is sponsored by the New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA), an all-volunteer nonprofit based in southeastern MA. In 2005, we started a sighting network for basking sharks and ocean sunfish when seen in our coastal waters in the hopes of better understanding these two large and unusual fish. And in the fall, we now respond to stranding reports of live or dead ocean sunfish, especially in the Cape Cod area. We attempt to rescue any fish that strands live and we necropsy (autopsy) any ocean sunfish that strands dead. We weigh, measure, photograph and necropsy all dead sunfish and share data and tissues with researchers in the US and around the world.

    To learn more or to report your sightings of basking sharks and ocean sunfish, please visit our website at http://www.nebshark.org and thank you for your help. We need date, time, general location, latitude and longitude, and photos/video if possible.

    Best, Krill Carson
    Marine Biologist and President of NECWA
    New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (www.necwa.org)
    krillcarson@mac.com

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