GloucesterCast 329 Second Adventureman Call-In With Pat Dalpiaz, Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 3/24/19


GloucesterCastSquare

GloucesterCast 329 Second Adventureman Call-In With Pat Dalpiaz, Kim Smith and Joey Ciaramitaro Taped 3/24/19

podcasticon1

When you subscribe you need to verify your email address so they know we’re not sending you spam and that you want to receive the podcast or GMG in your email. So once you subscribe check your email for that verification. If you don’t see it, check your spam folder in your email acct so you can verify that you’d like to get them via email subscription.

subscribe1-picsay (2)1473522843911012199..jpg

subscribe1-picsay2259157744436385962.jpg


subscribe1-picsay (3)579008106437437025..jpg

Topics Include:

Adventureman Interview!

HERE IS THE INFO WITH TIMES TO RUN!! JOIN IN AS ADVENTUREMAN FINISHES HIS 5,500 MILE US RUN IN GLOUCESTER- PLEASE SHARE!!!!

Adventureman arrival is getting real! Runners can meet Wednesday afternoon at Robert Sweeney Park in Manchester for 6 mile run in, or at Hammond Castle for 2.25 run, or at Stage Fort Park for last .7 miles. All are welcome to run or welcome Adventureman to Gloucester. He hopes to finish at Fisherman’s Memorial right about 4 PM. Shout outs to:
Mayor and police (Gloucester and Manchester)
Ringo Tarr
Beauport Hotel and Ray Johnston
Rosa family
James and Anna Eves/Cape Ann Giclee
Chamber of Commerce/Kerry

Sefathia and Cape Ann Brewing Speak Easy Scandal

Pastaio Vis Corta Sardines

Pat and Jim tried out Goombadis … a relaxed, friendly spot! Good luck to them.
https://www.facebook.com/Goombadis

Foxes being Killed At Duxbury Beach To Protect Piping Plovers and Other Shorebirds

Jonah Crab Industry

New Police Chief Ed Conley

Our live video interview with Adventureman from this morning 3/24/19

 

FACTS ABOUT FOX KILLING AT DUXBURY BEACH AND DEBUNKING PIPING PLOVER MYTH #6

Let’s talk about the petition circulating in Duxbury to prevent wildlife officials from taking foxes and coyotes that are eating Piping Plover eggs. Many friends have sent links to the story and I apologize for taking over a week to respond.

Local persons are re-posting the story on their social media platforms unintentionally, and in the case of one, intentionally, inciting outrage at the Piping Plovers. This story has become sensationalized and taken out of context. I experienced a similar situation, that of a story about Piping Plovers being misrepresented, when last summer a Boston news channel interviewed me at Good Harbor Beach about our PiPls nesting in the parking lot. Instead of a feature about what a great job our DPW, Mayor’s administration, and community were doing in helping protect the nesting Piping Plovers that had been driven into the parking lot by dogs, it was edited as a story about GHB loosing income from lost parking spaces. In reality, our PiPl family had returned to the beach by the time all the parking spaces were needed.

Readers should know that fox and coyote hunting is permitted in Massachusetts. The 2019 hunting season dates are January 1st through February 28th, resuming November 1st and continuing through February 29th, 2020. Read More Here. Hunting is part of our culture. To be very clear, I love all animals, I LOVE foxes, and especially Red Fox. When one made a midnight visit to our backyard several weeks ago and snooped around the base of our Blue Princess holly, my husband and I were beyond excited about the prospect of them possibly denning in our garden.

Red Fox Coffins Beach

All that being said, it is sadly understandable why a number of beaches along the Northeastern Seaboard, beside Duxbury beach (including Crane Beach, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, other Massachusetts beaches, Rhode Island beaches, and New Jersey beaches) have had to resort to predator management programs. This is the course of last resort. Please bear in mind that Eastern Coyotes, Herring Gulls, Great Black-backed Gulls, Crows, and Red Foxes are not endangered, rare, or even threatened species, as are many of the region’s nesting shorebirds.

I have seen first hand at Coffins Beach a Red Fox mom and her kit digging in the sand and coming very close to where there was a Piping Plover nest. Last year, the only nest that was at Coffins Beach was believed by Greenbelt to have been predated by fox. In 2018, at Winthrop Beach, dogs off leash, and a skunk, caused the entire colony of 150 pairs of endangered Least Terns to abandon the established nesting area and move elsewhere. The year before that, again at Winthrop Beach, a Peregrine Falcon had killed numerous chicks, both Least Tern and Piping Plover.

 

Least Tern eggs are exposed in the sand, just as are the eggs of Piping Plovers, and many other species of shorebirds.

At Crane Beach, electric fencing is used during the night to keep fox and coyote away from the PiPl and Least Tern nests. The wire exclosures that we use at Good Harbor Beach to protect the nests will only be used for as long as avian predators do not realize they can perch on the edge of the wire and eat the adults as they move in and out of the exclosure to brood the eggs.

Peregrine Falcon eating a bird and a gull waiting to snatch a few morsels. 

In the case of the Peregrine Falcon, it was relocated to the western part of the state. However, relocating mammals is not a legal option in Massachusetts. Electric fencing is not possible at all beaches. Wire exclosures are no longer used at Crane Beach because Great Horned Owls learned they could prey upon the adult Piping Plovers as they were entering and exiting the exclosure.

Killing wildlife to protect other species of wildlife is a very sensitive topic and again, is the action of last resort taken.

People often say, why not let nature takes its course. But there is really very little that is natural about beaches that were once shorebird habitat that have now become public. The reason why we have predation by Red and Gray Fox, Eastern Coyotes, Skunks, Crows, and a variety of gull species at public beaches is because they are attracted to the garbage left behind by people and there is nothing natural about that!

I urge everyone to read the following to gain a better understanding of why some beaches have had to to turn to predator management programs:

Duxbury Beach and Predator Management

Recently questions have come up regarding the predator management program on Duxbury Beach.  This is a controversial and oftentimes upsetting topic but is one of the challenges that the Duxbury Beach Reservation faces when trying to balance the many uses of the beach.

As landowners and stewards of Duxbury Beach for over 100 years, the Reservation strives to maintain a balance between protecting the natural resources of the beach, including habitat for wildlife, preserving the barrier which shelters the communities behind it, and providing use of the beach for recreational purposes including over-sand vehicles.   In order to provide use of the beach for recreation, habitat and species conservation regulations must be adhered to including predator management mandates by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Many residents of the South Shore have visited Duxbury Beach since childhood and have likely seen big changes to the beach – both through dune and infrastructure projects and in how the beach must be managed under local, state, and federal law.

Duxbury Beach is unique is many ways, including the nesting habitat it affords to rare and protected shorebirds.  Unfortunately, Piping Plover conservation, which is regulated under the state and federal Endangered Species Acts, can come in to conflict with human interests, including development and recreation.  In order to provide greater options for beach managers working to adhere to state and federal guidelines for plover protection while providing recreational opportunities, the state of Massachusetts has a Habitat Conservation Plan under the US Fish and Wildlife Service.  The Plan allows certain “risky” activities while providing mitigation to ensure the plover population is better protected overall.  The Duxbury Beach Reservation received a sub-permit under this statewide plan to allow recreational driving on the back road and front beach in closer proximity to young plover chicks.

Under this permit allowing recreational driving, the Duxbury Beach Reservation is responsible for continuing an intensive monitoring program and providing mitigation.  As stated by Mass Wildlife, the only form of mitigation acceptable under the US Fish and Wildlife permit is lethal predator control, because it has the highest likelihood of offsetting the potential loss.

Predator management is not the Reservation’s first option and is carefully considered each year and on a case by case basis.  The predator management program has been in place on Duxbury Beach for 8 years.  For comparison, predator management has occurred on beaches in the state of Massachusetts for over 13 years.  The plan on Duxbury Beach has undergone continuance debate and study throughout its tenure, with examination by multiple agencies and several opportunities for public comment.

The Duxbury Beach predator management program design was and continues to be based on extensive data collected on the beach on predator presence and egg and chick loss to ensure the program targets those species that are responsible for heavy losses.  Fox have been removed 3 of the past 8 years that a predator management program has been in place, and every year the number removed has been far, far fewer than the numbers suggested on social media.  This targeted removal during a limited time of year has been successful in providing two rare and protected species, the Piping Plover and Least Tern, a window of opportunity to nest and raise young on some of the little remaining nesting habitat on the east coast.  It has also afforded thousands of visitors the chance to come and enjoy the beach.

Instituting a predator management program is controversial, challenging, often upsetting, and may even seem counter-intuitive to many.  Why remove one species so that another may succeed?  Aren’t there other options?

While it may seem simple to “let nature take its course” we do not operate in an entirely “natural” system.  With the removal of large predators, such as wolves, from this area by the mid-20th century, mid-sized predators, including fox, coyote, and raccoons, were able to extend their ranges and increase in population in these areas.  There are communities of hundreds of homes flanking Duxbury Beach that provide ample habitat for species like red fox that can do very well in suburban and even urban areas while other species, like the plovers and terns, have had habitat regularly destroyed by development.

Today, the largest cause of plover and tern egg and chick loss on Duxbury Beach, and many other beaches statewide, is predation by species whose populations are not in jeopardy.  Unfortunately, the common predators on Duxbury Beach, including the larger mammals (fox and coyote) and avian predators (crow and gull) are more likely to be attracted to the beach due to trash. There are staff on Duxbury Beach in the summer to pick up trash on the beach, road, and parking lots in the hopes of making the beach less attractive to animals like fox.  With communities at the far end of the beach it is impossible to limit the attractiveness of Duxbury Beach to predators with large ranges. There are very few suitable denning spots on the beach and most of the large mammals come to the beach from mainland Duxbury and Marshfield where they find ample denning spots under houses, sheds, etc.

Unfortunately, relocation of individual predators is not an option for multiple reasons:

  • It is illegal under Massachusetts law to capture and relocate wildlife off your property
  • Conflict, stress, or death caused due to intrusion into an existing individual’s territory
  • Harm to the individuals removed from their territory and a struggle to find food and shelter. Humans do not always recognize appropriate habitats for wildlife and put them in bad locations.
  • Spread of disease
  • Disruption of ecological processes by introducing a new species or more individuals to an area
  • The problem is not solved, but moved to a new location

Many have questioned why Duxbury Beach does not use “wire cages” around plover nests as are sometimes seen on other beaches.  These cages are predator exclosures and are oftentimes an unsuccessful and harmful tool. Unfortunately, predators (including fox, raptors, crow, and others) can target exclosures and kill adults when they switch off the nest. This is more detrimental to plover conservation than losing eggs or chicks because of the loss of future reproductive potential of the breeding adult. Predator exclosure use is highly dependent on beach, nesting site, and predator suite.   On Duxbury Beach it is not typically feasible to use exclosures, however, it is carefully considered. In addition, exclosures do not work for Least Tern nests as they are colonial nesters and fly to and from the nest.

In some cases, electric fencing can be used around plover and/or tern nesting areas. While this is only helpful in detracting large, mammalian predators, it does work on some beaches. Unfortunately, given the span, configuration, and location (dynamic beach), electric fencing is not feasible on Duxbury Beach.

This is not an easy topic and one that is discussed and voted on annually by the Reservation’s board. The Reservation will continue to collect and analyze data and assess all possible options for conservation and site management in order to protect the natural resources of the beach and maintain the protective barrier, while providing access for recreation where possible.  The Reservation will also continue to work with state and federal regulators to find the best options for protection on Duxbury Beach in order to adhere to the laws we must operate under.  We appreciate everyone who has taken the time to learn more about the work and understand that we are doing our upmost to strike a balance between the many uses of Duxbury Beach.

If you are interested in learning more about statewide shorebird conservation efforts or predator management work, we recommend reaching out to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Today! closing party Rocky Neck Now 2019 group show

Sense of place and artists- Installation views before the closing party March 24, 2019 Rocky Neck Now 2019 Looking All Around at Rocky Neck Cultural Center 

 

Pat Lowery Collins art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (29).jpg

Loren Doucette art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (30).jpg

Marci Davis art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (25).jpg

Andy Marlow art_Rocky Neck Cultural Center group show_20190324_© catherien ryan (17).jpg

Phyllis A. Marine Associations celebrates the 1950’s

Gruppe Painting Raffle will Benefit the Restoration of the Phyllis A

The Phyllis A Marine A Association is excited to announce that, through a partnership with the State of the Art Gallery, a very significant Emile Gruppe painting has become available and will be raffled as a benefit fundraiser.
The restoration of this 1925 fishing vessel, built for Albert Arnold, is the oldest former fishing vessel in Gloucester harbor. Arnold’s family migrated from Michigan in 1910 along with other families including the Tysvers, Dahlmers, Shoares and others whom were referred to as the “Michigan Bears” and they used a special method of fishing called gillnetting working out of East Gloucester.
“Shoares Wharf” was located on East Main Street and is now part of a private residence. This painting was completed in the early 1930’s and shows another gillnetter tied to the dock along with a smaller fishing vessel. Measuring 20″x24″, this painting has been recently restored and framed.
Never seen by the public, this painting has had ownership by Emile Gruppe, Walker Fielding and Joseph W Moore with an appraisal value of $14,000.
Only two hundred tickets will be sold, at $200 each, to raise $40,000. Monies raised beyond the appraisal value will go directly to the Phyllis A to support the restoration of this historical vessel.
Purchase tickets at the State-of-the-Art Gallery – 4 Wonson Street on Rocky Neck. Contact Roger @ 978/395-1783 or Phyllis A Marine Association @978/283-9292. Or click the button below.
The painting will be available for viewing at the Phyllis A Marine Association’s annual party on April 6th, at the Gloucester Fraternity Club, Webster Street. (Link to tickets also below.)
A Preview Party and Raffle Drawing will be held on June 6th at the Gloucester House Restaurant.
Otherwise to view the painting, please contact Roger Armstrong for special viewing.Everyone at the Phyllis A would like to thank Roger Armstrong and his Gallery, and Lenny Linquata and the Gloucester House for this exciting and wonderful opportunity.


Purchase tickets online

Copyright © 2019 Phyllis A. Marine Association, All rights reserved.
We have collected the emails from our “guests” over the years. We hope you enjoy our more timely updates!

Our mailing address is:
Phyllis A. Marine Association
81 Rocky Neck Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930

Add us to your address book

 

MARITIME GLOUCESTER

It’s a beautiful day in the Maritime Gloucester neighborhood today. The Museum and Gift Shop are open from 12-4 PM. Admission is half price, come on down and learn about your ocean and it Maritime history. We are open Saturday, Sunday & Monday 12-4 PM. Lots of our exhibits are interactive.

The Gig Rowers have already been out today! Membership is available for both Gig Rowers and Maritime Gloucester

Week 3 FIRSTS #GloucesterMA | Try Mr. Goulart’s local history trivia for 9th graders at Gloucester High School – good luck!

GHS_20180423_©catherine ryan

Over six weeks I’m posting local history trivia questions from Shaun Goulart’s creative weekly scavenger project for his 9th grade history class at Gloucester High School– except we’ll be one week behind the students’ pace. He explains that the “questions are multi-layered and usually have an image required in the submission. All questions will deal with Gloucester’s local history. I recommended to the students to utilize friends and family so your student may be reaching out to you for help. It is a competition and the prizes will be calculated into the Term 4 grade” for the students.

Mr. Goulart’s LOCAL HISTORY TRIVIA WEEK THREE 

WEEK 3 of 6: FIRSTS

Below is a list of 15 locations. Each one requires an image with a group member in it.

  1. The location of Gloucester’s first“Four Year High School”
  2. The location of Gloucester’s first Brick Building?
  3. The first schoolmaster and town clerk’s house. (private property do not trespass).
  4. A list of the first recorded Gloucester fishermen lost at sea. (Hint: 1716)
  5. The location of the first carillon built in America.
  6. The location of Gloucester’s oldest surviving burial ground for the First Parish.
  7. The location of Gloucester’s first town hall.
  8. The location named after the first settled minister on Cape Ann.
  9. An example of a First Period house. (include the year of the house)
  10. Mural depicting the “Founding of Gloucester”. (the first pioneers) Hint: Build not for today alone, build for tomorrow as well.
  11. The house that was the first location of a library in Gloucester.
  12. The location of the first city owned bridge. It was a drawbridge moved by a hand-cranked winch.
  13. The first statue formerly atop the Our Lady of Good Voyage Church.
  14. The plaque for the first meeting house green. (a.k.a Meeting House Plain)
  15. The first location for the YMCA in Gloucester Mass.

 

Prior Posts

3/21/19 Week Two results

3/17/19 Week Two trivia questions

3/14/19 Week One results

3/10/19 Week One trivia questions

Adventureman is now in Massachusetts- Check Out The Live Map Tracker!!!

Click on and Save this link to follow his live interactive tracker map and know where he is

Here are some of the videos that have led him up to this point-