Nia, Thursday, Jan. 10,  10:15 am at MAGMA Classic Nia Routine-AWAKE

Cape Ann Wellness

nia awake shoutout grapgicWhat is Nia?  Safe, thoughtful, cardiovascular fitness to great music!  No-impact movement, adaptable to all levels of fitness and ability. Nia is a fun, no-impact cardiovascular, fitness program that draws from
three areas of movement:

  • Martial Arts:Tai Chi, Taekwando & Aikido,
  • Dance Arts:Jazz, Modern & Interpretive Dance
  • Healing Arts:Yoga, Alexander Technique &
    Feldenkrais Method

Nia can be practiced by people of all ages and ability levels.  Nia can be done in bare feet and comfortable workout or yoga clothing.

For more info visit niawithlinda.com

Experience a Classic Nia routine.  Our current routine, AWAKE! focuses on the movements of the spine.  Fun music taken from contemporary Indian artists.

Building Access: You may enter the building either on the Pleasant St. side or on the Main St. entrance.  Elevator is accessed by the Main St. door.  Walk to the rear of the arcade and take  Take elevator to…

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Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation MLK Celebration

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GLOUCESTER MEETINGHOUSE FOUNDATION

                                                                      presents

Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration

Monday, January 21st 2019, 2:00-6:00pm

Gloucester Unitarian Universalist Church

Corner of Middle and Church Street

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Gloucester’s 3rd Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration: an afternoon of presentations about African-American History including Sandra Ronan, historian Stephanie Buck, live music by Alvin Foster and his band Soul Eclectic, award-winning filmmaker/journalist Clennon L. King on MLK’s Boston years, followed by audio of Martin Luther King, Jr. accompanied by a slide show. Audience invited to ring the Paul Revere bell at the conclusion for freedom; a free community event presented by the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation. More info at: www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

SCHEDULE

2:00-2:15      Introduction: ‘Why Are We Here?                                       Sandra Ronan

2:15-2:45      ‘Shadowed Lives,’ Effects of Slavery on Cape Ann         Stephanie Buck

2:45-3:00      Break with Refreshments

3:00-3:45      Alvin Foster and his band Soul Eclectic, music that underpinned Black people’s courage to be happy and celebrate life, love, spirituality and growth in the face of racism

3:45-4:00      Break with Refreshments

4:00-5:00      Keynote Speaker: Clennon L. King, ‘MLK’S Boston Years’ The award-winning documentary filmmaker and journalist Clennon L. King will present a slideshow, focusing on the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s movements in Boston and New England, from the fall of 1951 to the spring of 1954, to be followed by Q&A with the audience

5:00-5:15      Break with Refreshments

5:15-6:00      Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” accompanied by a slide show of period and present-day images by Monty Lewis

Conclusion    Audience invited to join in ringing the Paul Revere Bell for freedom

 

ADMISSION FREE

Donations to the Gloucester Meetinghouse Foundation are very welcome; memberships, mugs, caps, totes, shirts and refreshments available

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: CLENNON L. KING ON ‘MLK’S BOSTON YEARS’

A Filmmaker’s Granular Look at Dr. & Mrs. King’s New England Years a lasered look at the little-known years Dr. King and his wife, Coretta Scott spent in Boston and New England. Award-winning documentary filmmaker and journalist Clennon L. King, will present a slideshow, focusing on the Kings’ movements in Boston and New England, from the fall of 1951 to the spring of 1954.

“Americans know all about Dr. King relative to places like Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, Washington, D.C. and Memphis, but virtually nothing about his time in Boston,” said Clennon L. King, (no relation) whose father was a lawyer for Dr. King in the Historic Albany Movement. “This slideshow seeks to fill in the blanks.” Clennon L. King will present the compelling PowerPoint® slideshow to audience, before leading a spirited conversation and Q&A with the audience. The program is free and open to the public.

Clennon L. King writes, “In a city as historic as Boston, there are few signs that Martin Luther King, Jr. lived, worked and played here before heading to Montgomery to the world stage,” said the Boston-based filmmaker. “My goal was to reconstruct his time here before it is lost to history forever.”

Clennon L. King’s 45-minute slideshow and discussion program is entitled “MLK’s Boston Years”, and was presented to MLK Boston, which plans to build a $5 million monument to Dr. and Mrs. King on the Boston Common. Boston’s NPR affiliate, WGBH 89.7 FM has twice interviewed King around his research on the Kings’ time in Boston. In April 2018, the filmmaker was featured on the Boston Edition of All Things Considered® with Barbara Howard, and in November 2018, he again was featured on ‘Under the Radar’ with Callie Crossley.

 

For interested media outlets want to interview Mr. King, please contact him directly at either 207-450-3585 or by email at clennon@augustinemonica.com

STEPHANIE BUCK: ‘SHADOWED LIVES’

Born and educated in England – degree from London University – married an American and moved to Gloucester in 1970 – became interested in local history through research on her house – which is just across the road from the Unitarian Universalist Church. She retired as Archivist/Librarian of the Cape Ann Museum last May after 14 years. The title of her presentation is “Shadowed Lives” – just skimming the surface of slavery on Cape Ann.

 

LOCATION AND MORE INFORMATION

The Gloucester Meetinghouse (home of the Unitarian Universalist Church) is located on the green at the corner of Church and Middle Street. Event parking is allowed on the green and is available at other parking lots nearby in the Historic District. An elevator up to the Sanctuary level is available from the side entrance at 10 Church Street. More information please visit www.gloucestermeetinghouse.org

 

Anita Walker, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, message about the superpower of art & culture

December 2018 looking ahead:

“We are on the front lines of a war on poverty. Not necessarily a shortage of material wealth, although its distribution in America is both a consequence and contributor to the current distress.

The poverty our field confronts every day is that which Robert Kennedy confronted while running for President in 1968. He contrasted the wealth represented in the nation’s gross national product with the wealth necessary to sustain a democracy and make life worth living. 

He said, “…the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

We are currently in one of the best economies in a generation, but studies show record declines in our sense of well-being. Worse yet, life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. Major newspapers are sounding the alarm. In the Washington Post, George Will writes that loneliness, a major public health problem, is in “epidemic proportions” and that people are unhappier, more isolated and less fulfilled. David Brooks claims, in the New York Times, the biggest factor is the crisis of connection. We are “in a straight-up social catastrophe,” he writes. 
 
For nearly the last 20 years, those of us who advocate for the arts and culture have made the economy the centerpiece of our argument. We’ve collected economic impact data, counted the jobs we create and the taxes we generate, and touted our centrality to the tourism industry. We became the poster child of the creative economy. In an environment of it’s the economy stupid, these arguments won over state legislators and delivered budget increases to state arts agencies.

Five years ago, I wrote a column for a national arts blog suggesting that it was time to dial back the economic argument, even suggesting that there is something powerful about the intrinsic value of the arts. That the transforming power of culture is the power of creative expression, human engagement, and empathy. 

This is the poverty of our time. When Kennedy spoke of joy, beauty, intelligence, integrity, wit, wisdom, courage, compassion, and devotion he spoke of the ideals that are inherent in art and culture.

The arts and culture are the antidote to what ails us as a nation. In fact, they can both prevent and cure. Studies show that creative and cultural participation enhances human health and well-being leading to: reduced social isolation; opportunities for learning; calming experiences and decreased anxiety; more optimism, hope and enjoyment; increased self-esteem and sense of identity; increased inspiration and “meaning-making;” and better communication.

I can write about the studies and outcomes, but the heart is more articulate:
“It is a remarkable experience to witness a high school student watching a young adult with down’s syndrome or cerebral palsy offer a sonnet, and think to himself, ‘I want to do that. I want to have that kind of courage, that kind of conviction.’ Or to be a man or a woman of any age and watch someone you have typecast in your heart of hearts as somehow less than, stand in the center of a crowd and speak a truth about what it is like to dream of being seen for all of what you offer and know that a wall has just fallen…and through that kind of honest performance, know that you have been changed for the better,” writes Maria Sirois about Community Access to the Arts in Great Barrington, an organization that unleashes the arts in people with disabilities.

Music can help stroke victims regain their speech. You’re never too old to sing, or dance, or paint. Victims of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia find calm and clarity through the arts. Art is a universal language that bridges race, ethnicity, and culture – in a neighborhood, or across continents. The arts help explain the complexity of physics or climate change. Science and art are close cousins, sharing the bloodlines of creativity, risk taking, and problem solving.
 
Massachusetts cultural organizations are committed to serving everybody in the Commonwealth. They joined a new program this year to offer the benefits only the arts and culture can provide to people who have fallen on hard times and are receiving assistance through the state EBT card, a card that provides help to families living near the poverty level. Our organizations agreed to offer free or greatly reduced admission prices to EBT cardholders. In our first year, we tracked 220,000 EBT admissions. 

Nearly a quarter of a million doses of arts and culture to people in need. Again, the heart is in the stories. One concertgoer, who had not been able to attend a concert in years said, “It was nice to have a slice of my old life back.” Another said “It’s hard to describe the feeling of being able to do something ‘normal’ when everything else isn’t.”

The Mass Cultural Council is not an economic development agency, but when we do arts well, tourists visit and spend money, communities become destinations and better places to live, jobs are supported and created, innovators want to live here, and build new businesses.
 
The Mass Cultural Council is not an education agency, but when children have a quality experience participating in the arts, in school, and out of school, they exercise their creative minds, learn to think critically, are better observers and team players, and get a better education.

The Mass Cultural Council is not a human service agency, but when some of our most troubled youth participate in arts programs that give them a productive outlet for their fears and anger, provide a supportive community, build self-esteem and teach skills that will last a lifetime, these young people are saved from gangs, prison, drugs, even death.

In her book “Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum writes:

“Citizens cannot relate well to the complex world around them by factual knowledge and logic alone. The third ability of the citizen, closely related to the first two, is what we can call the narrative imagination. This means the ability to think what it might be like to be in the shoes of a person different from oneself, to be an intelligent reader of that person’s story, and to understand the emotions and wishes and desires that someone so placed might have.”

Martha Nussbaum is a close reader of Aristotle, who defined the good life as one that was authentically meaningfully rich: rich with relationships, ideas, emotion, health and vigor, recognition and contribution, passion and fulfillment, great accomplishment, and enduring achievement.

George Will writes of the crumbling of America’s social infrastructure and the need for new habits of mind and heart, new practices of neighborliness. David Brooks says, “It’s not jobs, jobs, jobs anymore. It’s relationships, relationships, relationships.” Real relationships, not virtual or transactional ones. True engagement of heart and mind.

The poverty we face is one we can defeat. Novelist Alice Walker once said, “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”
 
Story. Imagination. Empathy. This is our superpower: the power of culture.” – 
Anita Walker , Executive Director, Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) 

Visit the Mass Cultural Council website

Have a podcast listen – Creative Minds Out Loud:  podcast for art and Culture –  Informative and lively conversations with arts and cultural leaders. Creative Minds Out Loud is a project of the Mass Cultural Council, and is hosted by Executive Director Anita Walker. https://creativemindsoutloud.org

 

 

Cape Ann Report – Opioid Use Disorder

New episdoe of Cape Ann Report!

Cape Ann Report – Opioid Use Disorder

Maureen Aylward, Host of Cape Ann Report, talks with Damian Archer, MD, Chief Medical Officer at North Shore Community Health Gloucester Family Health, Tito Rodriguez, Care Advocate and Outreach Specialist at PAARI Gloucester Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative, and Kara Blake, Harm Reduction Program Manager at North Shore Health Project Gloucester. They talk about the opioid epidemic, the stigma, treatment of the disease, and all the options available to those struggling with the disease and their loved ones.

Webinar help for the 2019 Bruce J. Anderson Grant from the Boston Foundation

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from The Boston Foundation for the Bruce J. Anderson Foundation (BJA):

Dear friends, 

We hope you are having a great start to the new year.  We are hosting a Webinar Information Session for the Bruce J. Anderson Foundation (BJA) next Friday on January 11th at 11:00 a.m. EST.   The purpose of the Information Session is to:

  • Provide an overview of the mission and funding priorities of the BJA
  • Assist with technical questions related to the online application.

This Information Session is primarily for organizations applying for funding for the first time and/or need help submitting the proposal online. Please note that this webinar is not mandatory and attendance will not affect how your application is reviewed. Reminder: The online application is due on Friday, February 8th at 11:59 p.m. EST.  You can access it here. To attend the webinar on Friday, January 11th at 11:00 a.m. please follow the instructions below and accept the attached calendar invitation:

Join Skype Meeting

Trouble Joining? Try Skype Web App

Step 1: Dial in to the meeting: (206) 902 3250. Passcode: 587776 #

Step 2: Click “Join Skype Meeting.”

Step 3: Download the Skype for Business Meetings app and run the application by following the prompted instructions.

Best regards, Ritika Kumar, Donor Services Associate, The Boston Foundation, 75 Arlington Street, Boston, MA 02116, Ritika.Kumar@tbf.org

Prior GMG post about 2019 Grant Announcement

Mass Mudders Sleigh

My boys love this.  Nice job, Mass Mudders

What a creative and fun thing to do with their Adopt a Visibility Site!  We have always enjoyed seeing their displays at Exit 14 over the years and this one is our favorite.  I think it is so great that they put such thought and effort into what they do with their site….and my boys definitely appreciate the work that goes into it.  So, thanks to Mass Mudders!

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Art Reception for Jon Sarkin and Paul Cary Goldberg at Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI)

 

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“Big Boy Fish Head” GMGI acquisition; Paul Cary Goldberg (L) Jon Sarkin (R)

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) acquired original art by Paul Cary Goldberg and Jon Sarkin for its special new research institute headquarters on Main Street — which means they built an impressive ~~temporary~~ corporate collection from the get-go! *update 1/10/19: GMGI stresses that “these pieces are on loan, and remain property of the artists and are for sale.” Ok! So they could be a great start to a permanent collection. For a peek inside, including in-situ shots, see Kim Smith’s post about the GMGI expansion groundbreaking 

ARTIST RECEPTION JANUARY 10, 2019

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) is excited to host an Artist Reception for Paul Cary Goldberg and Jon Sarkin on Thursday, January 10th from 5- 6:30pm at GMGI’s Research Institute at 417 Main Street. RSVP Please contact Ashley Destino (772.708.8266 or Ashley.destino@gmgi.org) if you’d like to join us!

UPCOMING

GMGI regularly hosts private groups, including science educators from the North Shore this January. GMGI will be announcing plans for public Open House dates in the coming weeks!

Mark your calendars: on Thursday January 24th, 2019, there’s an academy open house at the teaching facility in Blackburn (55 Blackburn Circle, Gloucester, MA.,) for the community and prospective students to learn more. Check it out!

Blowin’ In the Wind

We visited Salisbury Beach on windy New Year’s Day and noticed this guy removing his shirt and running straight into the waves. I think the people on the shoreline just happened by and were unrelated to the plunger. His name is Shawn and he told me it’s his annual tradition. Good on you, Shawn!

I was struck by the differences between this solo plunge into the wild waters at Salisbury Beach and the numerous plungers into relatively calm waters on Rocky Neck earlier in the day.

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