OUR LADY OF GOOD VOYAGE DOUBLE CROSSES ILLUMINATED BY MOONLIGHT

The double crosses of the bell tower holding the Moon

December’s Full Snow Moon, also named the Cold Moon

About the architecture of Our Lady of Good Voyage from the National Park Service –

A fire destroyed the original church in 1914. Prominent architect Halfdan M. Hanson designed and immediately began building the existing, unique Mission style church, which replaced the earlier church. It is the only Mission style church in Gloucester. Modeled after a church in the Azores, Our Lady of Good Voyage consists of two distinct sections: the two-story main worship space that is of a cruciform plan and an L-shaped rectory that extends from the northwest corner of the main worship space. The rectory, which was built between 1872 and 1884 as a separate building, was incorporated into the new church. Resting on a granite foundation, the building is covered in a buff-colored stucco. Flanked by two identical bell towers, the central bay of the façade is pierced by the main entrance at the first level. A rose window adorns the second level, above which rises an ogee pediment supporting a pedestal and a statue of Our Lady of Good Voyage, who holds a boat in her left hand as a symbol of a safe voyage. In 1922, bells were installed in the towers. These bells, still in place today, were cast by John Taylor & Company of England-the same foundry that cast Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell.

3 thoughts on “OUR LADY OF GOOD VOYAGE DOUBLE CROSSES ILLUMINATED BY MOONLIGHT

  1. great pictures but a different London foundry that cast the Liberty Bell. The Whitechapel Bell Foundry cast the Liberty Bell in 1752. thanks

    Like

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