CATERPILLAR CONDO

Caterpillar Condo

Several readers have written to ask how do I manage to have so many Monarch Butterfly caterpillars and chrysalises. The answer is very simple–because we have planted a wonderful little milkweed patch! We grow both Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) side-by-side. Our milkweed patch is planted near our kitchen. When washing the dishes, I can look out the window and watch all the pollinators and fabulous activity that takes place at the milkweed patch.

Several weeks ago, a Mama Monarch arrived and I watched as she gently floated from leaf to leaf, and bud to bud, ovipositing one golden egg at a time. She went back and forth between the Common and Marsh, depositing eggs on both the tender upper foliage as well as the more sturdy lower leaves. I waited for her to leave, but not too long (because the eggs are quickly eaten by spiders) and collected the sprigs with the eggs. I thought I had scooped up about eight eggs and you can imagine our surprise when 19 caterpillars hatched, all within the same day! Female Monarchs like to deposit eggs around the tiny buds of Marsh Milkweed and many of the eggs were hidden within the buds.

Here’s a video of a Mama depositing eggs on Marsh Milkweed buds. Charlotte was with me that day and we were dancing to the song “There She Goes” as the butterfly was depositing her eggs and it was too perfect not to include in the video clip.

Our garden is postage stamp size, but I have managed to fill it with a wide variety of songbird, butterfly, bee, and hummingbird attractants. The great majority of plants are North American native wildflowers and shrubs, and we also include a few nectar-rich, non-native, but non-invasive, flowering plants. Plant, and they will come 🙂

I am super excited to give my children’s program at the Cape Ann Museum on Saturday morning. The program is free and open to the public. I hope to see you there!

RESCUED MINKE WHALE PHOTOS FROM AL BEZANSON AND IMPORTANT MARINE STRANDING MESSAGE FROM NOAA

Minke Whale Smith’s Cove Gloucester Harbor

Green Dragon Schooner Captain Al Bezanson, who first alerted GMG to the Minke Whale temporarily grounded at Gloucester Harbor, shares his photos and observations. Ainsley Smith, NOAA’s Marine Animal Response Coordinator, shares information on what to do if you see a whale, dolphin, or seal stranded or in distress. With so many whales currently feeding off our shores, as well as the extreme number of seal deaths, we appreciate Ainsley’s advice.

Al writes, “The whale looked to be a juvenile about ten feet long, I thought. Perhaps confused by running aground and kept trying to forge ahead. I did not see the rescue but turning him or her was probably the key to freedom, and moving a rock would provide the space.”
Ainsley writes, “Yesterday morning, a small minke whale got stuck in less than 2 feet of water in Smith Cove, Gloucester. The beaching was reported to us at around 8 a.m., and our Stranding Coordinator immediately left for the scene. The situation was also reported to the harbormaster, the animal control officer, and NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement.

By the time our Stranding Coordinator arrived at 8:30, we are told that a local resident had moved a large boulder that appeared to be preventing the whale from returning to deeper water. Our Stranding Coordinator, along with the harbormaster, Gloucester animal control officer, and NOAA OLE agent, then searched for the whale throughout the harbor, but were unable to find it again, which is good news! We are hoping the whale made it back to deep water safely.

We appreciate the outpouring of concern for this whale, and understand that it is very hard to watch a whale struggle. We feel the same way, which is why we are in this line of work!

This is a good opportunity to remind everyone that, under federal law, specifically the Marine Mammal Protection Act, only authorized responders are allowed to interact with stranded marine mammals. Often, marine mammals strand because they are in distress, and a trained responder will best know how to evaluate and help the animal. Pushing an animal back into the water may delay treatment or response, and also limits our ability to gather important information to be able to best help. For example, an entangled minke whale was reported near Gloucester last week, so it would have been valuable to examine this whale for injuries and see if it may have been the same one.

Whales in distress can also be dangerous, as they are unpredictable and very powerful. People have been seriously injured or killed trying to help, which is another reason we ask that people wait for trained responders.

The best thing you can do to help a marine mammal in distress is call the NOAA hotline (866-755-6622) or your local stranding response partner, and stand by the animal until help arrives.

Additionally, if people see a marine mammal in an unusual place (like a busy harbor or shallow water), please report it to the hotline so it can be monitored and we can alert people in the area to help keep it safe. We heard several reports yesterday after the stranding that a whale had been seen in the harbor earlier the week, but no one had reported it to us.” 

Minke Whale Smith’s Cove Goucester Harbor Al Bezanson Photo

Beautiful September exhibition: Peter Morse and David West at Jane Deering Gallery

Neither Mustard Nor Teeth
photographs by Peter Morse
drawings by David West 
September 1-30. Reception September 29, 5-7pm, Jane Deering Gallery, 19 Pleasant Street, Gloucester

 

Jane Deering September 2018

from the exhibition release:

“Neither Mustard nor Teeth, by artists Peter Morse and David West, is an exploration of the everyday discipline of the artist searching to find the extraordinary and the beautiful among the quotidian rhythms of ordinary life.

Morse’s photos call attention to the overlooked. They catch moments of light, pattern, form and structure that might otherwise be sensed only out of the corner of the eye. What is captured in the frame draws us nearer, asks us to pause. While grounded in the ordinary, they leave the viewer with questions about time and place and the seemingly familiar. West’s drawings feature the townscape of Gloucester as seen by a non-native. They are visual handshakes from a Southern alien coming to terms with a new place for the first time. The quiet empty spaces offer little peace; the architectures crowd each other and jostle for attention as they attempt to stay upright.

Both bodies of work are rooted in the act of stopping and looking, the life blood of the artist. Slowing down. Being present in the moment long enough to pay attention and to record. Whether the action is contained in the fraction of a shutter click, or the longer process of drawing, each is a response to the quiet call of objects and moments at hand. The phrase — neither mustard nor teeth — is from the essay, Of Power and Time, by the Massachusetts poet Mary Oliver. Oliver tells of the tensions between the necessity of living in the world with its demands of time and task and energy, all the while striving to see the inherent beauty of it all, to make sense of it through the creative process:

It is six a.m., and I am working. I am absent-minded, reckless, heedless of social obligations, etc. It is as it must be. The tire goes flat, the tooth falls out, there will be a hundred meals without mustard. The poem gets written. I have wrestled with the angel and I am stained with light and I have no shame. Neither do I have guilt. My responsibility is not to the ordinary, or the timely. It does not include mustard, or teeth.

Peter Morse lives in Amesbury, and David West is resident here in Gloucester. Both artists are in need of going to the grocery as well as the dentist.

Peter Morse holds a BA Summa Cum Laude from Gordon College and an MFA in Photography from the University of Hartford, CT. Residencies include Berlin, Germany, New York, NY and Portland OR. He teaches at Gordon College where he is also Manager of the Barrington Center for the Arts and the Gallery. He has exhibited in the US, Germany and Cuba. Morse maintains a studio in Amesbury MA.

David West is originally from Mississippi. He holds an MFA from Louisiana State University with a concentration in printmaking. He is Associate Professor of art at Gordon College, Wenham MA where he is Chair of the Art Department. West is also Co-Founder/Curator of ArtSpace 86 Gallery in Jackson MS. He has exhibited widely in the US. West is now living in Gloucester MA

Coming Up in October at the Rockport Library

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Wallace Stegner

“[T]hat old September feeling, left over from school days, of summer passing, vacation nearly done, obligations gathering, books and football in the air … Another fall, another turned page: there was something of jubilee in that annual autumnal beginning, as if last year’s mistakes had been wiped clean by summer.”
― Wallace Stegner, Angle of Repose

Dear Friends,
I won
If any of you have read Stegner’s Pulitzer Prize-winning (1972) novel? It has long been a favorite of mine. I especially appreciate the optimistic tone and fresh perspective of the quote above.
For Friends of the Rockport Library, September is an autumnal beginning. The governing board reconvenes, re-committing to our mission of fundraising in support of library programming that encourages lifelong learning. As we start to plan for our annual October sale, we invite you to join us by donating, sorting, stacking, and packing books and/or signing up to set up, staff, and deconstruct the sale. (Sorting is my favorite task, as it puts me in touch with all kinds of books that are new to me). We certainly hope you will all be shoppers!  Please make note of the dates:

 

Monday, October 22                       Begin Fall Book Sale set-up                     

Tuesday, October 23                      Book Sale set-up  TBD

Wednesday, October 24                 Book Sale set-up 9-12

Thursday, October 25                    Book Sale set-up 9-12

                                                                Members’ Preview Night 5-7

Friday, October 26                          Book Sale 10-5

Saturday, October 27                      Book Sale 10-5

Sunday, October 26                         Book Sale 1-5

Monday, October 27                       Book Sale clean-up time TBD

If you can help in any way, please call Peg Anderson at 978-546-6216.

Item for the Magnolia Pier Restoration

Join us onboard the Schooner Thomas E. Lannon for a fundraiser for the rebuilding of the Magnolia Pier.

$100/person includes a glass of champagne and delicious appetizers while we sail about Gloucester’s historic harbor.

Magnolia Pier Fundraiser Aboard the Thomas E. Lannon

Date and Time

Sun, September 23, 2018

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

Location

Location

Schooner Thomas E. Lannon

63 Rogers Street

Gloucester, MA 01930

Chris Stovall Brown is comin to heat things up ….Better crank up that A/C @ The Rhumb Line…8:30pm 9.6.2014

Thursday: The Rheum Line proudly presents Chris “Stovetop” Brown, the bestest of the best, on guitar and vocals. He’ll eat your guitar strings for lunch.

Moreover, Mike Clark(e) pops the skins with the liquid of time. I’ll be there, too. This is a really fun outfit. Do come.

 

Dave Sag
😅

40 Railroad Avenue
Gloucester, MA 01930
(978) 283-9732

http://www.therhumbline.com/

 

Save The Date: Save Magnolia Pier Fundraiser

I am once again reaching out to all of our wonderful and supportive members and asking for assistance.  This time not for our beach, but for what a lot of us consider part of our “right of passage”  – MAGNOLIA PIER.  I would ask that you save the date of Friday, September 21st from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM for a fundraising event to help raise the private contribution portion needed to save Magnolia Pier.  Our neighbors at the Manchester Bath and Tennis have offered their facility to host this event.    Many artists and community members are donating auction items for the event for our guest auctioneer State Senator Bruce Tarr to auction off.  There are also several of our neighbors here in Magnolia and Manchester that have just asked where they can donate to this cause.  We are in need of donations, and volunteers to help with the auction as well as volunteers to help set up, park cars, serve food and so on.  This is a volunteer intense event.  In the days to follow you will receive information about the Save Magnolia Pier website and the link to The Gloucester Fund which will help us with receiving donations 100% of which will go to the pier.  You will also be receiving information about the fundraising sail aboard the beautiful Schooner Thomas Lannon, which will be held on Sunday, September 23rd form 11:00 Am to 12:30 PM,  If you have some time to volunteer, and item to donate (perhaps a beautiful picture or painting of the pier) please send me a reply.  There will be a planning meeting posted for those who can volunteer set up tomorrow.   The event will be a great time to socialize with your friends and neighbors and here about the pier project and what is being done.  I will have more detailed information to share with you before the week is over. Please send along any questions.

 Regards,

 Ted

Photo by Donna Ardizzoni

Gail McCarthy features Diane Polley and Marion Hall “Celebrating a new illustrated children’s book” today’s paper

Great article about the new children’s book, Let’s Go: Animal Tracks in the Snow! by Diane Polley illustrated by Marion Hall, an award winning entry in the Cape Ann Reads contest.

Celebrating a new illustrated children’s book by Gail McCarthy, Gloucester Daily Times, September 6, 2018

Deborah French, Director of Essex’s TOHP Burnham Library says Diane Polley “is an excellent example of a hidden children’s writer that was brought together with Marion Hall, the illustrator, through the Cape Ann Reads initiative to create a wonderful picture book. I’m sure she has more to come for us all to enjoy.”

BOOK LAUNCH CELEBRATION: Saturday, Sept 8 11:30-1:30, Cape Ann Cinema & Stage, 21 Main Street, Gloucester. “This is a free family drop-in event with children’s activities. Meet Diane Polley of Essex, the author and Marion Hall of Manchester, the illustrator, who will be signing copies of their book.”

Diane Polley Marion Hall Lets Go Gloucester Daily Times_20180906_075123.jpg

Visually stunning and original, Let’s Go Animal Tracks in the Snow, is a gentle and clever story and non-fiction picture book that engenders shared experiences.  Vivid wintery scenes are intimate and expansive, and beautiful watercolors match and extend the text. Expressions of color notes pop from the pages like finding fresh tracks in new snow. This children’s book is an irresistible inside outside story: snuggle up for a good read and wondrous exploration.

Nichole’s Picks 9/8 + 9/9

Pick #1:  Beverly Air Show

2018 Beverly Regional Airshow:  Flight For Cystic Fibrosis

September 8th & 9th, 2018 from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Flight4CF started in 2004 by Rich Little, after the birth of his daughter Piper, who was diagnosed with CF.

A year later, Rich incorporated Flight4CF as a nonprofit organization.

Shortly after Flight4CF became a nonprofit, the first event for the organization was held in 2005 with airplane rides generating over $25,000.

Attractions

READ MORE HERE

 

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Pick #2:  Ipswich Ale Harvest Fest 

Spencer Peirce Little Farm, Newbury

Harvest.Event

As always, Harvest Fest is free to attend. All ages and well-behaved, leashed dogs are welcome. 21+ with ID to drink. Beer is purchased using beer tickets; $6 per 16oz pour, cash or credit. Event will be held rain or shine. Live music all day! Cheer on a game of vintage baseball! Food will be available for purchase from food trucks on-site: Big Rig BBQ, Long Hill Orchard & Farm, Copperdome Crust Pizza, Kelly’s Roast Beef, Whoopie Wagon (***more TBD). Guests are expected to drink responsibly and ensure they have a safe means of transportation to and from the event. Parking is available on-site although we recommend using Uber & Lyft.

For questions or concerns, please reach out to Jordan@ipswichalebrewery.com.

Pick #3:  Map and Compass Treasure Hunt 

Ipswich River Wildlife

Registration Required: DO SO HERE

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Map and Compass Treasure Hunt

Sat, Sep 08, 2018 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Location:

Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary, Topsfield

Instructor:

Cori Brauer – Education Coordinator

Audience:

All (suitable for children 7 – 18 years)

Members:

Adult $8.00, Child $7.00

Nonmembers:

Adult $10.00, Child $8.00
Nonmembers can join today during checkout and take immediate advantage of member prices.

Join us for a guided map-and-compass treasure hunt around the sanctuary. Bring your own compass or use one of ours and learn how to find north, orient yourself, count paces, and use the map and compass to find your way. After some basics, we’ll hit the trails and use the new skills learned to search for some hidden natural treasures. No experience necessary. This program is a good introduction to orienteering for the whole family.

 

As always, for a comprehensive list of family activities please visit our friends at North Shore Kid

Restorative Reset with Thai Massage and Reiki at Treetop Yoga

Cape Ann Wellness

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Friday, September 7, 6:30-8:30 PM
Treetop Yoga Studio
3A Pond Road, Gloucester

Reset your body, mind, and heart in this Restorative Workshop with Megan Ghirardi. Restorative yoga is a relaxing and therapeutic practice that will leave you feeling calm and at ease.

Settle into a candlelit room and begin your evening with gentle pranayama (breath work) and a brief guided meditation to quiet the mind. Feel physical tension and stress melt away as you transition into fully supported yoga poses on the mats, blankets, and bolsters to help soothe the nervous system.

Hands on Reiki with Matt Malone, therapeutic Thai bodywork by Megan, and essential oils will create a spa-like experience as you enter a deep state of relaxation and bliss. You will leave feeling refreshed, nourished and replenished. If your body and mind crave more, plan on joining Megan for this monthly workshop in October and November as well.

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Everything is abundant at CAFM!

Cape Ann Community

IMG_0970.jpgCAFM logo

Cape Ann Farmers Market

Thursdays 3:00-6:30

Stage Fort Park 

**Free parking during the market! **

This week at the market, on top of fresh produce, local fish, and delicious baked goods, you can get your knives sharpened by Venier Forge or your bike repaired by Big Mike’s Bikes! Check out our website for our full list of vendors.

capeannfarmersmarket.org

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