We Added A “New” Old Fairbanks Cart To The Captain Joe’s Family

At the dock there are a couple of key pieces of equipment.  The winch, the forktruck, the scales and the carts.  Any one of these go down and we’re in serious trouble.  We rely on them to work day in and day out.  In the worst of all conditions.

You know how the fishing industry is the second most dangerous profession in the world behind coal mining?  Well it might be the second most dangerous profession but handling saltwater fish is absolutely the deadliest profession for machinery.  Salt, and saltwater, fish grease and massive tonnage being handled daily create the perfect storm of corrosiveness and opportunity for mechanical failure.

That’s why whenever I have an opportunity to secure a Fairbanks Cart to help perform our job at the dock I leap.  This morning at 5:00 AM I drove a couple of hours to get my hands on the newest member of the Captain Joe and Sons Lobster Company Family.  One of the best parts about the Fairbanks carts are the plug in caster systems.  If after years you need new casters, you contact the company and they can ship you out new ones.

The decks are absolute beastly and handle incredibly poundings without skipping a beat.  I routinely lower 400Lbs of lobster crates on them when offloading the boats and then add another stack of 400.  No problem.

Here’s the new one.  I put a couple of coats of linseed oil on the oak decking and greased up the greased fittings and she’s ready for servicing our lobster fleet!

Our “Old” Fairbanks cart that’s helped offload millions of pounds of lobsters through the decades and our newly acquired Fairbanks Cart with the pretty green paint.

Isn’t she pretty?

http://www.fairbankscasters.com/
from the website:

For more than 125 years, the Fairbanks Company has been shipping quality material handling equipment from our manufacturing facilities in Rome, GA. Our facilities encompass more than 200,000 square feet of production and warehousing space. To maintain our leadership role in the industry, we have modernized our facilities with the latest in robotic welding, electrostatic powder coating and CNC machining of wood parts.

These techniques have resulted in the expansion of our product offerings, making us a premier supplier of casters, wheel, handtrucks, platform trucks and dollies.

PIPING PLOVER SYMBOLIC FENCING RECOMMENDATIONS

ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING THURSDAY AUGUST 2ND AT 6:30PM AT CITY HALL: PIPING PLOVERS ON THE AGENDA.

Dogs romping within the clearly posted and cordoned off nesting area in April, forcing the Piping Plovers off the beach and to nest in the parking lot. 

This past spring and summer we had a tremendously difficult time with our nesting bird symbolic fencing. The posted and roped off area is referred to as “symbolic” because it is not an actual physical barrier, but a visual warning to let people know to keep themselves and their pets out of the cordoned off area. People often ask, why can’t more permanent fencing be placed around the nesting area? After nearly thirty plus years of working with Piping Plovers, biologists have established that physical fences placed on the shoreline and in the wrack area are all too easily washed away with high tides, create safety issues and, too, you wouldn’t want to trap dogs and predators within a nesting area.

The difficulty with our metal posts is that they were knocked about and pushed down with nearly every high tide, dragging the roping into the sand as well. The rope and posts needed almost daily righting.

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), which successfully protects Piping Plovers and other endangered birds at dozens of Massachusetts beaches have come up with what appears to be a good fencing solution for areas within tidal zones. DCR uses long, narrow fiberglass rods which can be pushed easily into the sand. The poles are strung with two rungs of roping, and in some places three rungs. I measured the distances between the poles at Revere Beach; they are placed about every twenty to twenty four feet.

In early spring, before the Piping Plovers and Least Terns have nested, historic nesting areas are roped off. After a nesting pair establishes a territory, a second row of poles and roping are added around the perimeter of the nesting area. The fiberglass poles can be adjusted without too much difficulty.

Wooden poles are used to post the nondescript, but informative endangered species signs. According to DCR staff, the only time they have complications with the fencing is when the wooden posts are tied into the fiberglass poles and the tide takes both down.

I don’t understand why the fiberglass poles are less likely to shift in the tide, but they don’t shift and appear to work very well in the tidal zone–perhaps because they are flexible and less rigid. If anyone knows the answer to that, please write.

PIPING PLOVER VOLUNTEER MONITOR GOOD HARBOR BEACH NESTING AREA FENCING RECOMMENDATION:

  1. Symbolic fencing of the two historic Piping Plover nesting areas roped off between March 15th and April 1st (boardwalk #3 and boardwalk #1).
  2. Fiberglass poles placed every twenty feet to twenty four feet.
  3. One to two rungs of roping.
  4. Wooden posts with endangered species signs installed at the same time and in place by April 1st, but not attached to the fiberglass poles.
  5. When active nest scrapes are identified, adjust exisiting fencing, and add a second row of fencing around the perimeter.
  6. To the outer perimeter of fiberglass poles, use three rungs of orange roping attached to the poles, extending all around the perimeter. One rung at 12 inches above ground, one rung at about 24-30 inches above ground level, and the top rung at four feet above ground level.
  7. Piping Plover volunteers monitor fencing and adjust as needed.

This photo, taken at Good Harbor Beach in early April, shows why it is so important to have the signs and roping in place by April 1st. People and dogs were playing in the nesting area while the PiPl were trying to nest. The top photo shows that a second, and even a third rung of roping, placed at dog height, may help to keep dogs out of the roped off area.

Examples of symbolic fencing areas at Revere Beach and Nahant Beach. Notice the double row of fencing and the double and triple rungs.

Information is unambigulously posted at Revere Beach

Piping Plover chicks finding shelter in the roped off nesting area on a hot summer day.

Treading lightly.

Music on Meetinghouse Green

MIDDLE EASTERN BEAT MEETS WESTERN JAZZ AT GLOUCESTER MEETINGHOUSE SUMMER CONCERT, AUGUST 10

  

A high energy evening is promised for Friday, August 10, when Hye Fusion plays at the free Music on Meetinghouse Green concert, 6 pm – 9 pm, at the corner of Church and Middle Street.

 The band performs a dynamic synergy of melodies and rhythms, integrating the best of Western jazz with the beat of Middle Eastern music. Hye Fusion, an American-born trio, plays both current and traditional instruments including the doumbek – a percussive instrument commonly played throughout the Middle East – as well as the oud, classical and rhythm guitars, keyboard, clarinet, and saxophone. Their music transports us to other worlds and cultures far from Gloucester, while providing familiar rhythms and beats of jazz. A not-to-be missed concert!

 

While the concert is free, concert-goers are encouraged to make free-will donations to the Open Door, which provides emergency groceries to those in need; community meals; the Second Glance Thrift Shop; and a free mobile farmer’s market. Bring cash or a checkbook; beach chairs or blankets. Food is provided by The Causeway, a popular local seafood eatery.             In case of inclement weather the concert will be held inside the Meetinghouse. Parking is available on Meetinghouse Green, in lots nearby, and at St. Peter’s Square.

 

Music on Meetinghouse Green’s sponsors include Linzee and Beth Coolidge; J.J. and Jackie Bell; Michael and Mary Bresnan; JoeAnn Hart and Gordon Baird; Harry and Mary Hintlian; Charles Nazarian; Dick and Doris Prouty; Sandra Ronan; Brent and Linda Wilkes; and our corporate sponsor, Cape Ann Savings Bank.

 

Ellen Ford Joins Fly Amero this Wednesdays @ The Rhumb Line 7pm 8.1.2018

Dinner Specials Each Week!
Wednesday, August 1 – 7pm
My Musical Guest: ELLEN FORD!

One of Cape Ann’s premier songbirds, Ellen Ford shines
beneath the Rhumb Line spotlight this week. A smooth and
pure voice, an eclectic song selection and… perhaps a bit of
accompaniment from Chick. Sure to be a lovely show. ~ Fly
Dinner with great music!
*Each week features a special, invited musical guest
The Rhumb Line Kitchen……features Morgan! Dishes are better than ever before!Plus a fine, affordable wine menu!
Upcoming…
8/8 – Liz Frame

8/15 – Jared Thomas

8/22 – Ardys Flavelle (Allen Estes Hosts)

Visit: http://www.therhumbline.com/
Looking forward……to seeing you there 🙂

It’s Team Ciaramitaro vs Team Zappa In A BBQ Cookoff Friday Night 7:00PM At The Bluefin Blowout

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My daughters and I will be squaring off against Famed Chef Peter Zappa of The Causeway Restaurant and his sons in a BBQ throwdown at the Bluefin Blowout Friday night.

We’ve got our work cut out for us but don’t count out us underdogs just yet Smile

Won’t you come join the fun at this family friendly event?

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It’s Bluefin Blowout Week!

http://bluefinblowout.com/2018-schedule/image

CLICK HERE FOR SCHEDULE OF EVENTS!

My daughters and I will be competing against the great Peter Zappa from The Causeway Restaurant and his sons Friday night at 7PM in a BBQ Cookoff at Mile Marker.  Come and enjoy this family friendly event with us!

www.bluefinblowout.com