Setting Up The @WeberGrills Go-Anywhere For Deflector Plate Cooking Lamb Shanks

Northeast BBQ

Trimmed the silver skin off the lamb shanks and rubbed on EVOO, minced garlic,coarse salt and pepper, rosemary and thyme.

Plan is to smoke offset the coals between 250-275 til 150 internal temp.

Link to purchase the heat deflector plate on Amazon-
https://amzn.to/2DW5Hqw

Link to purchase the aluminum drip trays/ to go containers on Amazon- https://amzn.to/2DWsse4
They are so versatile. I use them on my kettles and also in my airfryer.

http://www.goodmorninggloucester.com

Picked up two lamb Shanks at East Gloucester Stop and Shop.

Trimmed the silvers kind and rubbed with EVOO, coarse salt, pepper, minced garlic, rosemary and thyme…

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SNOWY OWL HEDWIG WEEKLY UPDATE AND THE REASON WHY CROWS ATTACK OWLS -By Kim Smith

Our beautiful Snowy Owl Hedwig was last seen on Monday night, March 12th. This was also the night before the third nor’easter. She was perched on the railing of the Ocean House Inn facing towards the sea. The wind was blowing fiercely. Well after dark, and after making several attempts, she successfully flew in a southerly direction out over the water.

It has been two weeks since that last sighting and perhaps we will see her again, but I imagine her to be safe and undertaking her return journey to the Arctic tundra, well-fed from her stay on Cape Ann. Whether she was well-rested is another story. The great majority of people who came to see this most approachable of owls were respectful and considerate of her quiet space. The crows however, were nothing short of brutal. After learning about why crows attack owls, and the degree of aggression possible, I am surprised she lasted as long as she did, and without great injury.

American Crow harassing a Peregrine Falcon, Atlantic Road

Crows and owls are natural enemies because a murder of crows may mob an owl to death (or any raptor by which it feels threatened) and owls occasionally eat crows. Crows are diurnal, which means they feed during the day. The majority of North American owl species that they encounter are nocturnal (night feeding). In the case of Snowy Owls, which feed both day and night, their paths may occasionally cross, as happened when Hedwig moved into the crow’s territory along Gloucester’s Atlantic Road.

American Crows harassing Snowy Owl Hedwig

A flock of American Crows can run circles around most owls, pecking, dive bombing, chasing, and in some instances killing. Snowy Owls are the exception; they are larger, stronger, and faster flyers than other North American owl species. And too, Snowy Owls are closely related to Great Horned Owls, a species known to eat crows when they are roosting overnight. So even though a crow in our area may never before have encountered a Snowy Owl, they instinctively know danger is present.

American Crow

With their incredible ability for recollection, crows are considered the brainiacs of the bird world. Daily, Hedwig outsmarted this smartest of bird species. She learned to stay well-hidden during the daylight hours, laying low atop the hotel roofs. Her salt and pepper coloring blended perfectly with the black, white, and gray colors of industrial roof venting equipment. She adapted to hunting strictly at night, after the crows had settled in for the evening, returning to her hideouts before the day began.

Where’s Hedwig?

From Hedwig’s perch atop the Atlantic Road hotels, she had a crystal clear view of the golf course and Bass Rocks, places prime for nightly hunting.

On one hand it would be fascinating if Hedwig had been outfitted with a tracking device. On the other, if she had been trapped for tagging, she may not return to this area. There is some evidence that Snowies occasionally return to an overwintering location. Next winter I’ll be taking more than a few peeks in the location of the Atlantis and Ocean House Inn Hotels to see if Hedwig has returned.

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“We Love You Too Snowy Owl” prints for sale

The sale of the “Super Blue Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse Over Gloucester Harbor” photo went very well. Thank you so very much to all who purchased a print! Many readers have asked about photos of Hedwig. For the next two weeks, I am offering a limited edition of the photo “We Love You Too Snowy Owl.” The 8 x 12 photo will be printed on fine art hot press paper and signed. At the end of two weeks, after orders are in and checks received, I will place the order with the printer. The $95.00 price includes shipping and tax. If you would like to purchase a photo of Hedwig, please email me at kimsmithdesigns@hotmail.com Thank you!

 

 

Beautiful Fish: Deep Sea Angler -By Al Bezanson

This head tentacle corresponds to the whiplike head spine of the goosefish, but is situated farther back, about abreast of the eyes. It is interpreted as representing a vestige of the first dorsal fin. The basal joint of the head tentacle is provided with retractor muscles by which it can be withdrawn rearward into a tunnel-like sheath along the head and back, bringing the “bait” close to the mouth.

Unique among the vertebrates in the fact that the males of many of them (including those of the Gulf of Maine species) are dwarfs in size as compared with the females, and live parasitic, attached to the females by their heads.

The parasitic males are fastened to the ventral side of the female, by two outgrowths from the front of the head, that are fused at the tip. They have no teeth, no tentacle-like spine and no eyes, and the alimentary canal is vestigial; in fact, about the only important internal organ is a large testis. But their fins resemble those of their mates, as do the gill openings; their skins are prickly; and they are similarly black. Those that have been seen (1 or 2 per female) have ranged from about 33/8 inches (85 mm.) long to about 6 inches (150 mm.) long (Gulf of Maine specimen).

From Fishes of the Gulf of Maine by Bigelow and Schroeder (1953) online courtesy of MBL/WHOI http://www.gma.org/fogm/Ceratias_holbolli.htm

 

Save the Date: Bluefin Blowout 2018!

2018 Bluefin Blowout | August 2-4

With the winter weather hanging in there, summer feels far away….but, thank goodness it isn’t.  And, one of the most exciting things about summer is the Bluefin Blowout!  Planning for this year’s event is very much underway and some fishy fun is shaping up!  You’d be crazy to not mark your calendars right now to make sure that you’re not double booked between August 2nd – 4th.  Even better, let your peeps know that “reel” friends don’t book baby showers, BBQs, or even book clubs during the Bluefin Blowout.

Many of us gathered on Saturday at Tonno Gloucester (lucky, lucky us) to discuss this summer’s tournament and brainstorm ways to make the 2018 Bluefin Blowout the best one yet.  A giant shoutout to Anthony Caturano and the staff at Tonno for spoiling us all with some amazing food to help get the wheels of creativity spinning.

Stay tuned for much more news!  As always the Lyon-Waugh Auto Group has some brilliant things up their sleeves!

Keep up to date on all things Bluefin Blowout at this link

Follow their Facebook Page here

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The 2018 Bluefin Blowout marks a 7 year milestone for us! The Bluefin Blowout is New England’s premier giant bluefin tuna tournament presented by the Lyon-Waugh Auto Group, and hosted by Cape Ann’s Marina Resort in the historic fishing port of Gloucester, MA! Showcased on the National Geographic’s hit series “Wicked Tuna,” the Bluefin Blowout draws some of the best giant tuna fishermen on the east coast competing in two long days of fishing to take home over $40,000 in cash, jackpots, and prizes along with the coveted Bluefin Blowout Trophy!

In past years we experienced a huge success with over 2800 pounds of bluefin tuna weighed in – the largest being caught by F/V Tuna.com weighing in at 914 lbs!

We invite everyone to enjoy the giant weigh-in station, vendors, tournament tent, live music and entertainment. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram for more updated information on the tournament and come celebrate the fishery of the magnificent bluefin tuna in true tournament fashion as the best of the best battle the giants of the ocean!

The Cape Ann’s Marina Resort offers plenty of amenities to make each day, throughout the weekend, a first class experience. In addition to the official tournament tent, the Cape Ann Marina Resort has quality slip accommodations, on-site fuel, Mile Marker One Café and Bar, an indoor pool, an onsite marine store, and more!

The 2018 Bluefin Blowout team will once again offer free boat ice, onsite totes of bait, and an official tournament tuna buyer!

We are also proud to announce our collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Association to raise funds to advance research to end Alzheimer’s and dementia while enhancing care for those living with the disease.

The 2018 Bluefin Blowout will offer select vendor displays, a catered Captain’s Dinner, raffles, a silent auction, and cash prizes!

Come witness this tournament and some of the best giant tuna fishing in the world is showcased in America’s Oldest Seaport!

 

 

Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental Group Opens Eighth Show…in Gloucester!

Jeff Grassie_Entrapment_ 20x30_ sculpture

PRESS RELEASE 
What: Unexpected No. 8 Exhibit – www.experimentalartgroup.com 
featuring Rockport Art Association & Museum artists and contributing members
When:  
April 2-April 30, 2018
Reception Saturday April 7, 5-7 pm
Where: NOTE VENUE Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental group show at Charles Fine Art Gallery in Gloucester, 196 Main Street, Gloucester, MA

The Rockport Art Association & Museum’s Experimental Group opens its eighth group exhibition, “Unexpected No. Eight” at Charles Fine Arts Gallery, 196 Main Street, Gloucester, MA 978.559.7762.  This juried show features artworks of both the RAA&M’s artists and contributing members. Works on view in the exhibition range in medium to include paintings, mixed-media, graphics, sculpture and photography.  The exhibition runs from April 2 through April 30, with an Artist Reception on Saturday, April 7 from 5-7 pm. There will also be a gallery talk by Jeff Grassie held on April 12 at 7pm.  Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 1-5 pm or by appointment. Closed Monday.

The Experimental Group is a creative forum, its main mission is to increase public awareness and to foster self-expression by bringing artists together to explore and share ideas that cultivate creative freedom. The EG is encouraged and supported by the Rockport Art Association & Museum. 

If you would like more information about the exhibition, would like to schedule an interview and a walk through, or need additional promotional images please contact: Nella Lush, Experimental Group, Chair, 978.886.4582 or via email experimentalgroupraa@gmail.com 

Rockport Art Association & Museum, 12 Main Street, Rockport, MA 01930  (RAA&M) is one of the oldest and most active art organizations in the country. The Association has a long and distinguished history that has spanned 96 years.

 

Gloucester Smiles- A New Baby

I met this couple in Sugar Magnolias, he was rubbing her belly at breakfast encouraging the over due arrival.

I asked them to send me a photo of the baby once it did arrive, see below Ariana, who arrived three days later.

Thank you and Congratulations

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FACES OF JESUS ART EXHIBIT

Christ, as seen through the eyes of the world, is the focus of a unique art display being shown at The House on the Rock (formerly Eastern Point School) as a message of hope during this

Easter season.  These contemporary works of art were submitted by over 800 artisans from 55 different countries who share their works for free through The International Union of Mail-Artists;

an organization started in 1988.  There are sculptures, drawings, paintings and photographs.  Some pieces are made from wood, plastic, metal, leather and even clothespins and a Yoo-hoo soft drink can! 

No two are the same, and each conveys its own emotion with the central theme of the face of Jesus Christ.

The exhibit was last shown at  La Salette, North Attleboro as part of its 2011 Festival in Lights and remained in residence there for three years.  Originally intended as a traveling exhibit, we are

pleased to have been selected to open this moving display here in Gloucester on Friday and Saturday, March 30 & 31 from 1:00-8:00 pm. 

This free event is being sponsored by The Last Stop of Rocky Neck.

For any further information contact Deborah at dlmichel7@gmail.com.

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