Bring it home! Rockefeller Edward Hopper #GloucesterMA Dogtown painting @ChristiesInc

EDWARD HOPPER Cape Ann Granite oc 29 x 40 1928 est 6 to 9 mil private collection Rockefeller

Christies, the New York auction power house is currently marketing the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection across the (art)world–Hong Kong, London, and Los Angeles– before the spring 2018 live sale back in New York. The collection includes a painting by American artist, Edward Hopper (1882-1967), that was inspired by Gloucester: Cape Ann Granite is one of the rare Hopper paintings remaining that’s not currently held in a museum. There are more than 110 Gloucester houses and vistas depicted by Edward Hopper.

Advance promotion of Christie’s upcoming Rockefeller auction have yet to illustrate the painting, although the artist’s recognizable name is mentioned in every press release and the painting is included in the world tour highlights exhibit. The catalogue for the sale is not ready.

Former owners of Cape Ann Granite have in common connections to Harvard, banking and art collecting

Billionaire and philanthropist, David Rockefeller (1915-2017), was a Harvard graduate and longtime CEO of Chase Manhattan bank (later JP Morgan Chase). His art appreciation began early,  influenced by both parents and the Rockefeller family collections. His father was the only son of  John D. Rockefeller, a co-founder of Standard Oil Corp. His mother, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (1874-1948), helped establish the Museum of Modern Art, and the fund in her name helped secure Hopper’s Corner Saloon for the permanent collection. Several family members were Trustees. After his mother’s death, David took her Trustee seat.

Like David Rockefeller, the first owner to acquire Cape Ann Granite was a Harvard graduate, art collector and financier, about the same age as Rockefeller’s parents, and Hopper. Benjamin Harrison Dibblee (1876 – 1945) was the scion of  California businessman, Albert Dibblee. The family estate “Fernhill” was built in 1870 in Ross, California (later the Katharine Branson School). Benjamin H Dibblee was a Harvard graduate (1895-1899), an All-American Crimson football player (halfback and Team Captain), and head coach (1899-1900). W.H. Lewis, a famous center rush, was the Assistant Coach. (Harvard football dominated under this coaching team. See the standings below the “read more’ break.) In 1909, Dibblee donated his father’s historic papers concerning California’s secret Civil War group “The Home Guard of 1861” including its muster roll and pledge of loyalty to Lincoln and the Union cause. Dibblee was an alternate delegate from California to the Republican National Convention in 1912. As a  Lt. Col. he was listed as one of five California committee members for the American Legion in 1919. He was a big wheel investment banker at EH Rollins & Sons, a firm impacted by the Wall Street crash of 1929.

Benjamin Harrison Dibblee Harvard Football all american then Captain Wikipedia photo first purchaser of Edward Hopper Cape Ann Granite Gloucester MA Dogtown painting later owned by Rock
Wikipedia photo of Dibblee  from The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association football guide, 1899

It’s fun to think about Dibblee possibly visiting Gloucester during his time at Harvard, like so many students and faculty; then, decades later, acquiring a major Hopper because it was both a modern masterpiece, and a Gloucester landscape.

The Hopper Cape Ann Granite painting has me itching to research all Crimson team photos– not simply varsity nor football circa 1895-97– because of the (remote) chance of another Gloucester-Harvard and athletic connection. In 1895 Dibblee was involved with sports at Harvard at the same time as author and Olympian, James Connolly.  In 1899 both were involved with football; Dibblee as the Harvard coach and Connolly as Gloucester’s athletic director and football player**. Maybe they scrimmaged. Maybe they scrimmaged in Gloucester.

Hopper’s artist inventory log pages for ‘1928 oils’ itemizes Cape Ann Granite as follows: “Sent on from Gloucester September 27, 1928, 3 canvases. Cape Ann Granite, 29 x 40, Green picture on hill with rocks. Fresh green in foreground. Slanting shadows cast by rocks and boulders. Sky blue with clouds. Small tree on R. BH Mr. Dibblee 49 Wall Streeet of San Francisco (Lived near 14 miles from San Francisco. Knows Alex Baldwin in Calif. (SanFrancisco) 1500 -1/3. 1000 on June 5, 194 ” 

EDWARD HOPPER diary page includes Gloucester entries
From Hopper’s Artist’s ledger -Book, ink graphite on paper, Whitney Museum of American Art, Gift of Lloyd Goodrich

 

The pencil annotation “Modern Masters EH 1933” accompanying the thumbnail sketch for the painting on the right of this entry may be mixed up. There was a  “Modern Masters” exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) held in 1940 but it did not include this painting on the checklist. There was an Edward Hopper Retrospective held at MoMA October 30–December 8 in 1933 that did list this Gloucester painting, and the lender, Dibblee. (Incidentally, two other 1928 oils catalogued on that same inventory page, Manhattan Bridge Loop and Freightcars Gloucester, would both end up in the Addison Gallery collection at Phillips Academy.)

The Pure Landscapes

Excerpts from the 1933 MoMa Hopper retrospective exhibition catalogue:

“…When Hopper went to art school the swagger brushstroke of such painters as Duveneck, Henri, and Chase was much admired. Perhaps as a reaction against this his own brushwork has grown more and more modest until it is scarcely noticeable. He shuns all richness of surface save where it helps him to express a particular sensation…in spite of his matter-of-factness, Hopper is a master of pictorial drama. But his actors are rarely human: the houses and thoroughfares of humanity are there, but they are peopled more often by fire hydrants, lamp posts, barber poles and telegraph poles than by human beings. When he does introduce figures among his buildings they often seem merely incidental. Perhaps during his long years as an illustrator he grew tired drawing obviously dramatic figures for magazines. Hopper has painted a few pictures in which there are neither men nor houses. The pure landscapes Cape Ann Granite (9), Hills, South Truro (16), Camel’s Hump (22) occupy a place apart in his work. they reveal a power which is diconcertingly hard to analyze. Cezanne and Courbet and John Crome convey sometimes a similar depth of feeling towards the earth and nature…” Alfred Barr, 1933

“In its most limited sense, modern art would seem to concern itself only with the technical innovations of the period. In its larger and to me irrevocable sense it is the art of all time; of definite personalites that remain forever modern by the fundamental truth that is in them. It makes Moliere at his greatest as new as Ibsen, or Giotto as modern as Cezanne.” Edward Hopper, 1933 

Yale owns a related watercolor by Edward Hopper, Cape Ann Pasture

EDWARD HOPPER, oil on canvas, Yale University collection, Edward Hopper All Around Gloucester by Catherine Ryan

 

Catherine Ryan art image design Edward Hopper all around Gloucester MAProceeds from the sale of the Peggy and David Rockefeller art collection at Christies next spring will benefit 10 selected charities. Perhaps a magnanimous collector might consider this Hopper Dogtown purchase for the Cape Ann Museum, a philanthropic twofer in this case, and needed. Cape Ann Museum does not possess a Hopper Gloucester painting and if any musuem should, it’s CAM. We need to eventually guide back the Hopper painting Gloucester Street, too.

Gloucester Street private collection Edward Hopper all around Gloucester

Glou Street Edward Hopper

To date Christie’s auction house has promoted primarily a Picasso and Matisse as the star lots from this collection of masterpieces because of their hefty valuation. The presale estimate for the Matisse Odalisque couchée aux magnolias (1923) is 50 million.  The Picasso painting, Fillette à la corbeille fleurie (1905), a “Rose period Masterwork”, is estimated to top 70 million. The presale estimate for the Hopper is 6 million to 8 million.

Christies highlight page for Rockefeller does not show the Hopper yet Dec 12 2017
Christies first press roll out features the Pciasso and Matisse

 

The Picasso was diplayed in the  libary of  the Rockefeller Upper East Side mansion at 146 East 65th Street.   Its first owners were Gertrude and Leo Stein. Gertrude Stein hated it though her brother bought it anyway. After Alice B. Toklas (Stein’s partner) died in 1965,  MoMa trustees drew lots and were offered first pass on the legendary Stein collection. David Rockefeller won first pick, and selected the Picasso. I wonder how it will fare in this #metoo awakening. At the time of her death, Toklas had long been evicted from their Paris home as she had no legal standing nor benefit from any estate sales.

Gertrude and Leo Stein Rockefeller Picasso provenance
installation Leo and Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas collection at home
installation Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas

Dibblee Harvard Crimson coaching stats:

1899: 10-0-1

Williams 29-0
Bowdoin 13-0
Wesleyan 20-0
Amherst 41-0
at Army (Westpoint) 18-0
Bates 29-0
Brown 11-0
Carlisle 22-10
Penn 16-0
Dartmouth 11-0
Yale 0-0 TIE

1900: 10-1

Wesleyan 24-0
Williams 12-0
Bowdoin 12-0
Amherst 18-0
Columbia 24-0
Bates 41-0
Army 29-0
Carlisle 17-5
Penn 17-5
Brown 11-6
Yale 0-28

1900 Harvard Football Team.png
Harvard Crimson Football team 1900

**I wrote about Connolly in a prior GMG post. “While still twenty-five pounds underweight from tropic fever, I took a job as physical director of the Gloucester Athletic Club. I played football on the Athletic Club eleven, spent the fall and winter (1899-1900) there, chucked that job in the spring, took a steerage trip to England, looked the London slums over, and went on to Paris, to take in the Paris Exposition, and, incidentally, compete in the Second Olympic Games.” 

BASA-3K-7-422-18-1896_Summer_Olympics
James Brendan Connolly 1896 Olympics wikicommons image from Bulgaria State Archives

5 thoughts on “Bring it home! Rockefeller Edward Hopper #GloucesterMA Dogtown painting @ChristiesInc

  1. I am eager for and interested in any information about Edward Hopper in Gloucester. I’ve only recently moved here, but I have been a fan of Hopper paintings ever since the Hopper exhibit at the Museum of Find Arts Boston a few years back.Thank you so much for this interesting information.

    Liked by 1 person

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