1927 shipwreck reappears again on Nauset Beach photos from Janet Crary

The three-master SS Montclair from Nova Scotia “a cargo vessel and suspected rum runner” came ashore in pieces in 1927. There were 2 survivors. Thank you Janet Crary for sharing news and photos from your hike on Nauset Beach!

© CRARY 2017-11-25 14.26.jpg

“Walked 2 miles south of Nauset Beach in Orleans Saturday to see the 1927 wreck of 3 masted Schooner Montclair. Story and earlier images reported Capecodtimes.com  and Boston Globe*.” – Janet

 

 

Boston Globe 2010 article
Boston Globe 2010 article reprinted 1927 photos and article.

Read the original Boston Globe 1927 article about the ship accident

Boston Globe archives

*Back in 2010 a fifty foot cluster of remains appeared near Chatham and articles mentioned the Montclair 1927 wreck the likely contender.

A year ago and nearby, the 1939 Lutzen shipwreck was unearthed by shifting sands after Fall storms.

“So many ships have piled up on the hidden sand bars off the coast between Chatham and Provincetown that those fifty miles of sea have been called an “ocean graveyard.” Indeed, between Truro and Wellfleet alone, there have been more than 1,000 wrecks.”– National Park Service

9 thoughts on “1927 shipwreck reappears again on Nauset Beach photos from Janet Crary

  1. The shifting sands of time, revealing treasures and memories …. Thanks for sharing the photos and story Janet and Catherine!

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    1. Hi Karen. It’s true. That wreck was mentioned in Beston’s Outermost House. The cargo, 2 million pieces of scattered lath, was scavenged by Nauset locals.
      I never forgot in ’74 my dad trudged us down Truro beach to see the unearthed wreck of British Man O’ War ship “Somerset” from the revolutionary war. You could still see the Roman numerals carved in to indicate depth of lading, and the burned ribs. Those were some big timbers.

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  2. I love this history and you just never what the waves or mother nature will show later under right conditions. All the natives stayed close to shorelines during warmer months and then moved inland during winter. Thank You for sharing this gem Janet Crary and Catherine Happy holidays! 🙂 Dave & Kim 🙂

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  3. My friend up here in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is the granddaughter of Garland Short, one of the survivors. He was 17 and if he hadn’t survived, she never would have been born@

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