Monthly Archives: October 2017

Alicia Unleashed Episode 69 With Joey C and Alicia Cox Taped 10/12/17

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Alicia Unleashed 69 With Joey C and Alicia Cox Taped 10/12/17

podcasticon1

Topics Include:

Take 2

01:40 Talking about being single differences between now and 20 years ago

03:35 Millennials Playing By Their Own Rules

05:52 Coming Out Day

06:30 Alexa Uses

14:00 Talking Tolerance

23:00 Bud Light Beer Can That Lights Up When Your Team Scores

25:20 Passports Social Media

25:55 Why Is It That Every Waitress Inevitably Asks You How Your Meal Is The Second You Put A Full Bite Of Food In Your Mouth?

28:00 The Most Consistent Gloucester Restaurants Over The Longest Period Of Time (Franklin, Passports, Duckworths)

30:17 Maria Seniti At The Franklin Guessing How Long They’ve Been Open, The Hanger Steak, Guessing Game- How Many Hangar Steaks Has The Franklin Served? Guess In the comments, closest wins a Hanger Steak and two drinks.

33:00 Au Beaujolais

34:40 Meeting Toby Pett

35:30 The Slut Double-Standard

37:15 Questions For Maria Seniti

37:55 Pronto Pizza

39:25 Shoutout To Hanna Kimberley and Predicting A Movie Deal

42:00 Harvey Weinstein Pulling The “I Need Rehab” PR Move Is So Cliche

44:40 Studio Crepe Closing

48:34 JD Aspesi Puts It All On The Line Stating Rockport House Of Pizza Has The Best Roast Beef Sandwiches Ever And I’m Intrigued

52:40 Alicia Does Her Roast Beef All wrong

53:20 Huge Roast Beef Mystery

 

 

 

WHEN A WEED IS NOT A WEED and Why Joe-Pye is So Darn Lovable!

A bodacious beauty possessing the toughest of traits, Joe-Pye Weed (Eutrochium) is the stalwart star of the eastern native plants garden. Large, airy dome-shaped flowerheads blooming in a range of shades from pink to lavender to purple provide food, by way of nectar, foliage, and seed heads to myriad species of bees, butterflies, and songbirds. Beginning in mid-July and continuing through mid-October, pollinators on the wing can find sustenance in a garden planted with Little Joes and Big Joes.

Joe Pye, the person, is thought to have been a North Carolina Native American medicine man who used these wildflowers to cure many ailments, including typhoid fever. The plants became know as Joe Pye’s weed.

A name changer from weed to wildflower would be a game changer for numerous species of native plants. Why do so many native wildflowers have the suffix weed? Because when the colonists arrived from Europe, they wanted their crops, as well as European cultivated flowers, to grow in their new gardens. Anything native that interfered with their plans was deemed a “weed.” Examples of beautiful and invaluable North American native pollinator plants with the name given weed are milkweed (Asclepias), sneezeweed (Helenium), ironweed (Veronia), and jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).

Three favorite and fabulous species for the New England landscape are Eutrochium purpureum, E. maculatum, and E. dubium. Joe-pye grows beautifully in average to moist soil, in full sun to light shade. Plant Joe-pye in the back of the border. E.purpurem grows five to seven feet tall, while Little Joe grows three to five feet. With their beautiful blossoms, robust habit, winter hardiness, and disease resistance, these long blooming members of the sunflower family are treasured for their ability to attract an array of butterflies, bees, and songbirds to the garden during the mid- to late-summer season.

Just look at this sampling of the different species of Lepidoptera finding noursihment from the blossoms of Joe-pye!

Tiger Swallowtail

Painted Lady

Black Swallowtail

Monarch

Joe-Pye does especially well in a coastal native plants garden.

 

If you enjoyed reading this post, I hope you will consider donating to the completion of my documentary film Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly. Every contribution is tremendously appreciated. For more information on how you can help, please visit the film’s website at www.monarchbutterflyfilm.com

 

 

 

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