Gloucester serves 62 gallons of Redfish Soup at Boston Seafood Festival

Carol Thistle forwards-

Hi Joey,
Thanks so much again for having me on your GMG Podcast Show last month. I really appreciated getting the word out about the City of Gloucester’s new 30% hotel tax contribution to tourism. Plus it was just really was great talking to you and Kim!!!
As you may know, The Fishermen’s Wives Association, the City of Gloucester and Snap Chef participated in the Boston Seafood Festival on Sunday, August 2nd. The goal was to promote Gloucester and Red Fish as an underutilized species.
Attached is a release with more information along with some images of Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken and Angela Sanfilippo, Presient of the Fishermen’s Wives Association who conducted food demonstrations for the crowds of people.
FUN FACTS: The team prepared and distributed 62 gallons of Redfish Soup during the Festival!
Nearly 15,000 people attended the show and at the Gloucester booth approximately 5,000 samples of the redfish soup were distributed!
-Gloucester’s Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken at the Boston Seafood Festival talking to the crowds about the benefit of using red fish in cooking.

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Mayor Theken and Angela Sanfilippo, President Fishermen’s Wives Association doing a cooking demonstration of Red Fish Soup at the Boston Seafood Festival.

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Some of our customers….even Pirates like Redfish Soup!

Pirates

Gloucester Summer Storm Photos

What a day for capturing dramatic skies!
Gloucester city skyline summer storm ©Kim Smith 2015

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Thundering and raining while the sun is trying to break out!

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Good morning in the garden summer rain- more please!

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summer storm ©Kim Smith 2015downed tree ©Kim Smith 2o15Downed tree on the road to Eastern Point Lighthouse

HARBOR CRUISE TO BENEFIT THE CARLO “SLEEPY PALLAZOLA MEMORIAL FUND”!

Join the Pallazola friends and family in honoring and raising funds for The Carlo “Sleepy” Pallazola Memorial Fund on a wonderfully fun cruise aboard the Lady Sea.

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Cape Ann Museum Walking tours this week

Hopper’s Houses – A Guided Walking Tour

A tour in downtown Gloucester to view houses immortalized by renowned American realist painter Edward Hopper

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Edward Hopper, American, 1882-1967. Universalist Church, 1926. Watercolor over graphite on cream wove paper, 35.6 x 50.8 cm. (14 x 20 in.). Princeton University Art Museum. Laura P. Hall Memorial Collection, bequest of Professor Clifton R. Hall x1946-268. Photo: Bruce M. White.

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present a guided walking tour of select Gloucester houses made famous by American realist painter Edward Hopper on Friday, August 7 at 10:00 a.m. Tours last about 1 1/2 hours and are held rain or shine. Participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. Cost is $10 for Cape Ann Museum members; $20 for nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10 for more information or to reserve a space. The Hopper’s Houses tour will also be offered on August 15, August 22, September 5 and September 12 .

American realist painter Edward Hopper is known to have painted in Gloucester on five separate occasions during the summer months in the years 1912, 1923, 1924, 1926 and 1928. His earliest visit in 1912 was made in the company of fellow artist Leon Kroll. During his second visit to Cape Ann in 1923, Hopper courted the young artist Josephine Nivison. He also began working in watercolor, capturing the local landscape and architecture in loosely rendered, light filled paintings. In 1924, Hopper and Nivison who were newly married returned to Gloucester on an extended honeymoon and continued to explore the area by foot and streetcar. During his final two visits to the area, in 1926 and 1928, Hopper produced some of his finest paintings. This special walking tour will explore the neighborhood surrounding the Museum, which includes many of the Gloucester houses immortalized by Hopper’s paintings.


Gloucester’s Middle Street
An ever evolving neighborhood

Guided walking tour offers historic perspective

The Saunders House, now part of the Sawyer Free Library, in the early 1880s. Photo by Edward Corliss & J. F. Ryan House Photographs, c. 1882-85. 4" x 6" cabinet cards. From the collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library and Archives.
The Saunders House, now part of the Sawyer Free Library, in the early 1880s. Photo by Edward Corliss & J. F. Ryan House Photographs, c. 1882-85. 4″ x 6″ cabinet cards. From the collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library and Archives.

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Historic Middle Street, a guided walking tour of one of Gloucester’s many historically rich streets, on Saturday, August 8 at 10:00 a.m. The tour meets at the Cape Ann Museum at 27 Pleasant Street and lasts about 1 1/2 hours. Tours are held rain or shine. Cost is $10 for Museum members; $20 nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited, reservations required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x16 for more information or to reserve a spot. Additional walking tours are offered throughout the summer – please visit capeannmuseum.org/events for more.

Did you know that a resident of Middle Street, Gloucester, saved the town from a British attack by sea during the Revolution? Or that a leading feminist and religious free thinker lived halfway down Middle Street? Or, that the 1764 Saunders House that forms part of the Sawyer Free Library has undergone at least three radical architectural changes including a massive Victorian tower? Four centuries of Gloucester’s social, economic, and architectural history are packed into this one short street in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Join us for a docent-led tour of an ever-evolving neighborhood where you will see surviving evidence of the past and will learn about structures and people now gone.


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The recently renovated Cape Ann Museum celebrates the art, history and culture of Cape Ann – a region with a rich and varied culture of nationally significant historical, industrial and artistic achievement. The Museum’s collections include fine art from the 19th century to the present, artifacts from the fishing & maritime and granite quarrying industries, textiles, furniture, a library/archives, and two historic houses. For a detailed media fact sheet please visit www.capeannmuseum.org/press.

The Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in Gloucester. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Admission is $10.00 adults, $8.00 Cape Ann residents, seniors and students. Youth (under 18) and Museum members are free. For more information please call: (978)283-0455 x10. Additional information can be found online at www.capeannmuseum.org.

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James Eves, owner of Cape Ann Giclée, Fine Art Printing and Gallery, is GMG’s Arts Enthusiast and the Calendar Guy. To submit arts related press releases, photos of arts events or any arts related posts email: james@capeanngiclee.com.
To add an event to the GMG Cape Ann Calendar go here to see how to submit events.

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The Rhumb Line Until after labor Day Trivia is suspended.Instead we will have our good friend Bradley Royds do his thing from 6:30-8:30..followed by Joe Wilkins and Funk du Jour at 9pm

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photo by Louise                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Community Photos 8/4/15

Hi Joey,
    Just returned home from another GREAT Gloucester vacation. We enjoy “smiles on Main Street” . Thought you might like a picture of “Smiles on the Thomas E. Lannon”.
                                   Sharon & Leo Kolenick  (Pottsville, Pennsylvania)

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It does not surprise me one bit that “SOME” people thought that the green and orange placeholder in The Action Cameron’s Plan Was The finished architectural renderings.

Here’s a link to Manny’s post-

Affordable Housing Downtown Site Plans

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(I put captions on there for those that thought otherwise)

I’d love to say I’m surprised that people made comments to the effect that they thought the plan that Manny Simoes put on the blog were the actual finished architectural drawings but I’m not even a teeny bit surprised.

I didn’t even see the post til the following day because I’ve been prescheduling my weekend blog posts and putting the blog on autopilot during the weekends lately.

But here’s what people may or may not know about the interwebs (and anyone that has read GMG for more than a year has read my countless rants about people’s reluctance to use or know how to perform a simple google search).  Read a handful of my previous frustrated rants about how people still in this day and age refuse to use google or a search engine here-

People that refuse to use Google are maddening!

Internet 101

It’s never going to sink in is it? ARGHHHHHH!!!!!

How much could I charge for a seminar to teach people how to look for things on the internet using a search engine?

It used to be worse but we’re probably still at about 50% of people that use the web that take EVERYTHING LITERALLY, do not know what a hyperlink is or that if you click on a blue sequence that the link will take them to another online place.

I’ve had dozens of conversations with our contributors saying that if you want to make sure the 50% of not-so-saavy internet people click on your actionable link that you should spell it out for them.

So say I wanted someone to click on a link to the blog, instead of doing this- Good Morning Gloucester To capture the people that don’t know that’s a link I would suggest that they take the extra time to write out-

Click Here To Go To The Good Morning Gloucester Site- http://www.goodmorninggloucester.com

Peter Van Ness told me a long time ago that you have to build web sites  using The Grandmother test.  The Grandmother test being that if they could figure out how to navigate it then you’re alright.

We have over 6000 email subscribers that receive an email around 8PM with a compilation of that day’s posts on the blog in an email.  I’d conservatively estimate that 70% of those email subscribers do not understand that the blog is not the individual emails that they get sent but an aggregation of the daily posts on the blog itself.  Many also don’t realize that if they couldn’t see a photo because it didn’t come through in the email that they could click on any of the hyperlinks in the email and go directly to the blog which resides at www.goodmorninggloucester.com

There are a ton of people that think the blog only exists as what they see on the front page.  That the over 22,000 previous posts that we’ve done are gone and can never be retrieved by doing a search or scrolling to the bottom of the blog and clicking the button that says “OLDER POSTS”.

I probably have explained to my mother 1000 times to do a search using the search box on GMG and she will still say to me something like  “I missed that post your sister put up about the zucchini fries the other day.”  And I tell her again did you type in zucchini in the search box, because I guarantee you’ll get your desired results.

Even people that I am close to days later that I think are reasonable intelligent folks made comments to the effect that they couldn’t believe that they were going to build an orange and green building with no windows on Main Street.  When I asked if they were serious, they told me they were dead serious.

The point is- no matter which way you fall on the proposal for the Camerons site, if you are a developer at a meeting and presenting plans, you might want to put a huge semi transparent watermark over the plan saying that the green and orange shading is only being used for placeholding and that these are not finished architectural drawings.

Because as internet saavy as you are as a developer or person presenting the plan having years of college and experience with computers under your belt- THERE ARE A SHIT TON OF REALLY NICE PEOPLE THAT ARE STILL VERY CLUELESS AS TO THE WAYS OF THE WEB.

THERE ARE A SHIT TON OF PEOPLE NO MATTER HOW OUTRAGEOUS YOU MAKE A POST THAT WILL TAKE IT SERIOUS AND NOT REALIZE THAT IT’S BEING SATIRICAL.

THERE ARE A SHIT TON OF PEOPLE THAT THINK IF YOU PUT UP A PLAN OF A BOX WITH NO WINDOWS AND SHADE IT IN A HIDEOUS GREEN AND CONTRASTING ORANGE THAT THESE WILL BE THE FINISHED LOOK OF A DOWNTOWN GLOUCESTER PROJECT.

That’s just the way it is.

Shuttle Smiles-1500

_2015_07_30_065897Captain Pete Favazza on the Lady Jillian enlightens you with Gloucester’s History, and sights in the Harbor. 

The Lady Jillian is operated by Cape Ann Harbor Tours.

 

 

Gloucester’s Middle Street – An ever evolving neighborhood

Guided walking tour offers historic perspective

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 31, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Historic Middle Street, a guided walking tour of one of Gloucester’s many historically rich streets, on Saturday, August 8 at 10:00 a.m. The tour meets at the Cape Ann Museum at 27 Pleasant Street and lasts about 1 1/2 hours. Tours are held rain or shine. Cost is $10 for Museum members; $20 nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited, reservations required. Emailinfo@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455, x16 for more information or to reserve a spot. Additional walking tours are offered throughout the summer – please visitcapeannmuseum.org/events for more.

Did you know that a resident of Middle Street, Gloucester, saved the town from a British attack by sea during the Revolution? Or that a leading feminist and religious free thinker lived halfway down Middle Street? Or, that the 1764 Saunders House that forms part of the Sawyer Free Library has undergone at least three radical architectural changes including a massive Victorian tower? Four centuries of Gloucester’s social, economic, and architectural history are packed into this one short street in the heart of downtown Gloucester. Join us for a docent-led tour of an ever-evolving neighborhood where you will see surviving evidence of the past and will learn about structures and people now gone.

unnamed-1The Saunders House, now part of the Sawyer Free Library, in the early 1880s. Photo by Edward Corliss & J. F. Ryan House Photographs, c. 1882-85. 4″ x 6″ cabinet cards. From the collection of the Cape Ann Museum Library and Archives.