Monthly Archives: July 2015

Common Milkweed Abloom, Here, There, and Everywhere!

Common Milkweed and Bee Asclepias syriaca ©Kim Smith 2015A patch of Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in bloom has a wonderfully sweet honey-hay scent. Look for it growing along the sand dunes, roadside edges, fields, meadows, and where ever there is a neglected patch. And keep your eyes peeled for Monarchs; the earliest arrivals (for the most part) are synchronized to the flowering of Common Milkweed.

Comsos 12 ©Kim Smith 2014 copy

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Hopper’s Houses – A Guided Walking Tour

A tour in downtown Gloucester to view houses immortalized by renowned American realist painter Edward Hopper

GLOUCESTER, Mass. (July 1, 2015) – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present a guided walking tour of select Gloucester houses made famous by American realist painter Edward Hopper on Saturday, July 11 at 10:00 a.m. Tours last about 1 1/2 hours and are held rain or shine. Participants should be comfortable being on their feet for that amount of time. Cost is $10 for Cape Ann Museum members; $20 for nonmembers (includes Museum admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Email info@capeannmuseum.org or call (978) 283-0455 x10 for more information or to reserve a space. The Hopper’s Houses tour will also be offered on July 25, August 1, 7, 15 & 22.

American realist painter Edward Hopper is known to have painted in Gloucester on five separate occasions during the summer months in the years 1912, 1923, 1924, 1926 and 1928. His earliest visit in 1912 was made in the company of fellow artist Leon Kroll. During his second visit to Cape Ann in 1923, Hopper courted the young artist Josephine Nivison. He also began working in watercolor, capturing the local landscape and architecture in loosely rendered, light filled paintings. In 1924, Hopper and Nivison who were newly married returned to Gloucester on an extended honeymoon and continued to explore the area by foot and streetcar. During his final two visits to the area, in 1926 and 1928, Hopper produced some of his finest paintings. This special walking tour will explore the neighborhood surrounding the Museum, which includes many of the Gloucester houses immortalized by Hopper’s paintings.

unnamedEdward Hopper, American, 1882-1967. Universalist Church, 1926. Watercolor over graphite on cream wove paper, 35.6 x 50.8 cm. (14 x 20 in.). Princeton University Art Museum. Laura P. Hall Memorial Collection, bequest of Professor Clifton R. Hall x1946-268. Photo: Bruce M. White.

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